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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 21, 2006
This year's Big Show at the Creative Alliance reflects the community-based art group's wide-ranging grass-roots appeal locally, as well as the prevailing mood in the larger art world outside Baltimore. There are about 175 works in the show in all styles and media, and if there's anything like the much-ballyhooed "Baltimore style" of art-making, this should be the place to find it. What one in fact finds in The Big Show, however, is something very much like the determined pluralism to be found virtually everywhere else in the art world these days.
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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
They're the first to acknowledge that they make an unlikely foursome. A Polish artist's daughter and three artists representing America, Nigeria and the Dominican Republic have forged an alliance to advance their individual creative visions - after hooking up on the Internet. The new friends, all co-organizers of Art Promotion Together on meetup.com, "just jelled," said Eva Skrenta, a Columbia resident who joined to showcase her father's work. When their art is displayed together, any questions about what connects their seemingly disparate worlds quickly fade away.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and By Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 7, 2000
LONDON --This is where old industry collides with new art, where machinery gives way to Monet and power yields to Picasso. This is Tate Modern, an art world giant made of brick and topped by a smokestack. Housed in a converted power plant, hugging the Thames River's south bank opposite St. Paul's Cathedral, Tate Modern has been hailed as a museum masterpiece of design and art. Bold and awe-inspiring, it grabs a nickname as hip as some of the art on display: "The Cathedral of Cool." Thursday, Queen Elizabeth II will preside at Tate Modern's official opening, 38 years after she dedicated the building when it took life as the Bankside Power Station.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
It's been more than a year since the Contemporary Museum closed its doors in order to rethink its mission and reorganize its operations and staff. The economic downturn that began in 2008 hit Baltimore's most insistent institutional advocate for what a Sun critic once called "the art of right now" particularly hard, and its lingering effects eventually forced the museum to suspend exhibitions entirely and lay off its five-person staff in May 2012. There's been nothing quite like it since.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 26, 2002
A recent trip to New York suggests that the contemporary art world is in love with photographs, whether they're scanned from a computer, painted with a brush or made the old-fashioned way with a camera. Mine was admittedly a hurried sample - a couple of big museum exhibits, plus the annual Armory Show, also known as the International Fair of New Art, and a smattering of galleries. But I couldn't help noticing the ubiquity of photographic imagery in the most ambitious venues. The Museum of Modern Art, for instance, is mounting a major retrospective of the German-born painter Gerhard Richter, whose work alternates between abstract expressionist-style gestural painting and figurative canvases based on photographs.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 6, 1996
Between 1910 and 1950, America underwent profound and irreversible changes. We fought in two world wars and went through the worst depression in our history. We experienced an immense growth in industry. We saw the coming of the automobile, movies, radio and television. And we witnessed a huge migration from rural to urban America in response to industrialization, the Depression and World War II.Not surprisingly, art in this country underwent similar upheaval. In 1910, America was an outpost of the art world; its center was Paris, where Matisse and Picasso caught the eye of forward-looking collectors such as Gertrude Stein and Baltimore's Cone sisters.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2001
The looming concrete exterior that frames the Walters Art Museum contrasts grimly with the delicate Monets and other Impressionist art displayed inside. No one would call this bleak surface art. But today, artist Dennis Adams and athlete Kalvin Evans are planning to stage an adventurous and ephemeral artistic event on that stark wall with the aim of turning the museum in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood inside out. The Centre Street museum's facade has been transformed into a rock-climbing surface with orange grips molded from some of the museum's artifacts.
NEWS
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,Los Angeles Times | August 25, 1996
"The Art Fair," by David Lipsky.Doubleday. 271 pages. $22.50.The novel's narrator, Richard Freely, is a precocious youngster who is shuttled between his artist mother in Manhattan and his writer father in Los Angeles. Their split was brought on by their mother's sudden arrival in the art world.Before she gained fame, their lives were idyllic, but as her work garned attention, the family life crumbled.If Lipsky's book reads so remarkably assured, perhaps it's because his story is drawn from real life: He is the son of painter Pat Lipsky Sutton.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Your review of the "Ashe to Amen" exhibition at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African-American History and Culture did a disservice to readers ("'Ashe to Amen' exhibit at Reginald Lewis museum raises questions," June 29). Instead of sharing the incredible content of the show, the reviewer chose to concentrate on what she perceived to be the ethical issues raised by the curator's decision to include one of her own artworks in the show. That topic was worth at most only a paragraph or two to anyone outside the art world.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1990
&TC THE GUERRILLA Girls plaster the complaints of thousands of American artists all over the walls of Lower Manhattan. Working at night, wearing gorilla masks to protect their identities, they hang posters which snipe at sexism and racism in the art world.Some of these graphic bullets have become collectors' items. For instance:"THE ADVANTAGES OF BEING A WOMAN ARTIST:"Working without the pressures of success."Not having to be in shows with men."Having an escape from the art world in your 4 free-lance jobs.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
Your review of the "Ashe to Amen" exhibition at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African-American History and Culture did a disservice to readers ("'Ashe to Amen' exhibit at Reginald Lewis museum raises questions," June 29). Instead of sharing the incredible content of the show, the reviewer chose to concentrate on what she perceived to be the ethical issues raised by the curator's decision to include one of her own artworks in the show. That topic was worth at most only a paragraph or two to anyone outside the art world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
The embattled Contemporary Museum will reopen this fall and winter, roughly 18 months after the institution abruptly shut its doors and laid off its five-member staff. The rejuvenated institution, now called The Contemporary, will return to its nomadic roots by mounting exhibitions at several as-yet-undetermined locations throughout Baltimore, instead of staging them in just one building that viewers have to deliberately decide to visit. "The Contemporary is back!" reads an announcement at contemporary.org.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
All summer long, even on the hottest days, a gentleman in a tuxedo stands on the Ocean City boardwalk. Locals and vacationers scurry over to find out what he's up to. The man is Joe Kro-Art, owner of Ocean Gallery, and if he's not playing boardwalk emcee, he's possibly watching a bicycle plunge from the rooftop of his old, hodge-podgy building. Of all the screaming attractions along the bustling Boardwalk, few have managed to sustain a vibrant and thriving business for as long as the outrageous, half-century-old gallery.
NEWS
April 21, 2013
One of the ironies of the art world is that for all its important holdings the Baltimore Museum of Art is laying off 14 people in order to balance its budget (" Baltimore Museum of Art lays off 14," April 9). Yet right over the city line, in Towson, the federal government is funding the construction of a new museum to house a collection of unknown value - the artifacts of the Ridgley family of Hampton. To make matters worse, the site chosen for the building is in an area of running streams and granite deposits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Baltimore helped the avant-garde painter Max Weber forge a national reputation in 1915. Now, nearly 100 years later, this could be the city where the late artist begins his long-overdue comeback. It's not that critics and curators are unfamiliar with the Russian-born, Brooklyn-raised painter's work. As a new exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art makes clear, Weber has long been considered one of the most significant American artists of the 20th century. But, at the peak of his career, Weber was a bona fide celebrity, with spreads in "Time," "Life," "Look" and 'The Saturday Evening Post.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
You usually head for a vending machine when you're craving a bag of chips or can of soda. But there's a one machine in Baltimore that dispenses objects such as a "Hankie Pankie," a heart-shaped engagement ring, a mini-Zombie or, for those in need of quick religious reassurance, a "Pocket Nun. " That's just some of the fare available — with a few crisp dollar bills — from the "Art-o-mat," part of a national project designed to bring fine art...
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 30, 1996
Life is short, and art is long, but sometimes both life and art can be short. That seems to be the thrust of "Basquiat," a biographical look at the young painter who blazed through the New York art world in the '80s but died of a heroin overdose at the age of 27. He didn't outlast the decade he dominated.The movie, directed by painter Julian Schnabel, has a good sense of authenticity (it was shot where it occurred) and is particularly mordant and incisive about the operations of the art world, a subject about which Schnabel obviously has a good deal of knowledge, and not a small amount of cynicism.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 18, 2005
To its practitioners and enthusiasts, fashion photography has always been the most underappreciated of modern art forms. With its unavoidable links to advertising and commerce, the fashion photo was until only recently the orphan stepchild of the art world, indisputably easy on the eye but calculated to stimulate material desire and consumption rather than to elevate the spirit. Irving Penn, who along with his sometime rival and colleague Richard Avedon set a new standard for the art of postwar fashion photography, was a perfectionist in matters of craft and wholly original in his pictorial imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
A 12-foot-long white banner with black letters has been suction-cupped to the first-floor windows of the former Craig Flinner art gallery at Charles and Centre streets. It reads: "Future home of the Contemporary Museum . Opening January, 2012. " At least, that's the plan. In fact, the date for the grand reopening is something of a moving target. At the moment, Sue Spaid, the Contemporary's executive director, doesn't have a signed lease. The museum's furniture and most of its documents are in storage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Moving through the Baltimore Museum of Art 's exhibit of work by the 2011 Baker Artist Awards provides an experience akin to that in the film "Pleasantville. " You start in living color and, before you know it, you're swallowed up in a black-and-white world. That cool, if slightly unsettling, transformation is achieved by an installation called "Interior/Exterior" by Gary Kachadourian, who has filled nearly every square inch of a gallery in the museum. "I've only done corners of rooms before," the artist said.
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