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January 27, 1991
Myer Site, a retired art teacher in the Baltimore schools who used art as therapy, died Wednesday of complications to Alzheimer's disease at Levindale.Services for Mr. Site, who was 84 and had lived at the Marylander Apartments and the old Mount Vernon Apartments, were held yesterday at Sol Levinson & Bros.He retired in 1966 as a teacher at Robert E. Lee Jr. High School after teaching at other junior high schools and at the Patterson Park and Southern high schools since 1926.His students' works were exhibited locally and at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
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January 25, 2012
Cindy Jamison, of Havre de Grace, has announced the engagement of her daughter, Janel Brooke Jones, formerly of Bel Air, to Ethan Curran Andersen, of Pleasanton, Calif. The bride to be is the daughter of the late Guthrie Jones, of Aberdeen, step-daughter of John Stephens, of Havre de Grace, and the granddaughter of Jim and Jean Jamison, of Bel Air. Jones is a 1995 graduate of C. Milton Wright High School and earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Art Therapy at The California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
Jeanette Kaplan Fino, a retired art therapist who was arrested in an early Baltimore civil rights incident, died Monday of lung disease at Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center. She was 79 and had lived in Mount Washington for many years. Until she retired five years ago, she worked in a mental health field in which clients create art to express their feelings in a nonverbal manner. A registered art therapist and certified professional counselor, she had a private practice and worked at the Compulsive Gambling Center on East Baltimore Street and at Spring Grove Hospital Center.
NEWS
November 28, 2003
Janice B. Willen, an artist and teacher of art therapy, died Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from complications relating to heart surgery. The Pikesville resident was 89. Janice Bernstein was born and raised in Baltimore and attended Forest Park High School. She went on to study at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where she graduated in 1933. She began her career as a fashion illustrator for the Brager-Eisenberg department store, and later taught watercolor and art therapy in several local nursing homes for Baltimore City Community College.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
The Westminster office of art therapist Pamela T. Manner is filled with artwork that probably will never decorate a home or hang in a museum.Its value is in other areas. The art helps its creators to express feelings they can't verbalize and allows them to look at their problems from a different perspective."It [art therapy] helps to get beyond the verbal words that people can use as denial and gets into more of the unconscious," said Ms. Manner, who has a private art therapy practice at the Center For the Healing Arts in Westminster.
NEWS
November 28, 2003
Janice B. Willen, an artist and teacher of art therapy, died Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from complications relating to heart surgery. The Pikesville resident was 89. Janice Bernstein was born and raised in Baltimore and attended Forest Park High School. She went on to study at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where she graduated in 1933. She began her career as a fashion illustrator for the Brager-Eisenberg department store, and later taught watercolor and art therapy in several local nursing homes for Baltimore City Community College.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
At 17, Kristin Rita Strouse was a promising young artist heading to Manhattan's Parsons School of Design, fresh from her Hunt Valley upbringing and a good education at Notre Dame Preparatory School. Six weeks later, she killed herself. She left behind many puzzling questions, often posed in the wake of a young person's suicide: Why did she give up on her life? What went through her mind at the end? How could she abandon her family and friends? But she has also left behind a legacy of sorts for her older sister, Kim, who wants to turn some of the mystery into a message - to be delivered through art. "We're dedicated to using the arts to help bring an end to suicide and celebrate life," Strouse says on a recent evening at the Maryland Art Place, where "The Rita Project" premiered with a circle of family and friends.
EXPLORE
January 25, 2012
Cindy Jamison, of Havre de Grace, has announced the engagement of her daughter, Janel Brooke Jones, formerly of Bel Air, to Ethan Curran Andersen, of Pleasanton, Calif. The bride to be is the daughter of the late Guthrie Jones, of Aberdeen, step-daughter of John Stephens, of Havre de Grace, and the granddaughter of Jim and Jean Jamison, of Bel Air. Jones is a 1995 graduate of C. Milton Wright High School and earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Art Therapy at The California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | May 20, 1992
Hidden away on a bulletin board behind the pay phones in the county office building is a hauntingly surreal art exhibit.At first glance, it looks like the work of children. A close inspection reveals something quite different. The artists are prisoners at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center for the criminally insane in Jessup.What the exhibit offers is an inside look at mental illness -- unsigned pictures stunning in their simplicity -- some in pencil, some in crayon.A drawing titled "The stygma (sic)
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
A state agency's progress report on Carroll County General Hospital shows that the hospital has fixed problems of time lags in completing patients' medical records, but still has some records that contain errors or lack required information.Hospital officials said yesterday that they have brought their medical records up to federal standards that require them to be completed and signed by doctors within 30 days after a patient leaves the hospital.That improvement spares CCGH from possible sanctions such as loss of eligibility for Medicare reimbursement.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2002
At 17, Kristin Rita Strouse was a promising young artist heading to Manhattan's Parsons School of Design, fresh from her Hunt Valley upbringing and a good education at Notre Dame Preparatory School. Six weeks later, she killed herself. She left behind many puzzling questions, often posed in the wake of a young person's suicide: Why did she give up on her life? What went through her mind at the end? How could she abandon her family and friends? But she has also left behind a legacy of sorts for her older sister, Kim, who wants to turn some of the mystery into a message - to be delivered through art. "We're dedicated to using the arts to help bring an end to suicide and celebrate life," Strouse says on a recent evening at the Maryland Art Place, where "The Rita Project" premiered with a circle of family and friends.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2001
Jeanette Kaplan Fino, a retired art therapist who was arrested in an early Baltimore civil rights incident, died Monday of lung disease at Ruxton Health and Rehabilitation Center. She was 79 and had lived in Mount Washington for many years. Until she retired five years ago, she worked in a mental health field in which clients create art to express their feelings in a nonverbal manner. A registered art therapist and certified professional counselor, she had a private practice and worked at the Compulsive Gambling Center on East Baltimore Street and at Spring Grove Hospital Center.
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2000
LINDA JOY Burke has been a professional poet for nearly a decade. Her nights of open-mike performances and coffeehouse freebies are long gone, she says, with the sound of relief in her voice. As hard as she worked to establish herself as a poet, Burke, 43, experienced tumultuous teen years that were even harder. It was then that her career began. "I was a kid that was numb a lot," said Burke, an Oakland Mills resident. "I was able to develop a sense of trust through the arts." On Saturday, Burke and fellow poet Edgar Silex, a Laurel resident and a National Endowment for the Arts fellow, will hold a reading for teen-agers from noon to 1 p.m. at the Wilde Times CafM-i as part of Columbia Festival of the Arts.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
At the southwest corner of Cathedral and Centre streets, as late summer turned to fall and fall turned cold, a garden budded and bloomed on a red brick facade, defying the incipient dormancy that attends the season.Like so many cockle shells and silver bells, flocks of winking flowers, tangles of vines and here and there a make-believe bloom shaped like a star or blessed with a smile spread across the wall, which overlooks a parking lot catty-corner from the Walters Art Gallery. The lush flora has grown into one of those enchanting, old-fashioned gardens that pull you in and soothe your soul.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
The Westminster office of art therapist Pamela T. Manner is filled with artwork that probably will never decorate a home or hang in a museum.Its value is in other areas. The art helps its creators to express feelings they can't verbalize and allows them to look at their problems from a different perspective."It [art therapy] helps to get beyond the verbal words that people can use as denial and gets into more of the unconscious," said Ms. Manner, who has a private art therapy practice at the Center For the Healing Arts in Westminster.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | July 1, 1993
A state agency's progress report on Carroll County General Hospital shows that the hospital has fixed problems of time lags in completing patients' medical records, but still has some records that contain errors or lack required information.Hospital officials said yesterday that they have brought their medical records up to federal standards that require them to be completed and signed by doctors within 30 days after a patient leaves the hospital.That improvement spares CCGH from possible sanctions such as loss of eligibility for Medicare reimbursement.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
Patti Prugh is not fazed by the angry, sorrowful, self-absorbed visitors who sit on a bland Thursday morning at My Sister's Place, a day shelter for women on Mulberry Street."
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2000
LINDA JOY Burke has been a professional poet for nearly a decade. Her nights of open-mike performances and coffeehouse freebies are long gone, she says, with the sound of relief in her voice. As hard as she worked to establish herself as a poet, Burke, 43, experienced tumultuous teen years that were even harder. It was then that her career began. "I was a kid that was numb a lot," said Burke, an Oakland Mills resident. "I was able to develop a sense of trust through the arts." On Saturday, Burke and fellow poet Edgar Silex, a Laurel resident and a National Endowment for the Arts fellow, will hold a reading for teen-agers from noon to 1 p.m. at the Wilde Times CafM-i as part of Columbia Festival of the Arts.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
Patti Prugh is not fazed by the angry, sorrowful, self-absorbed visitors who sit on a bland Thursday morning at My Sister's Place, a day shelter for women on Mulberry Street."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | May 20, 1992
Hidden away on a bulletin board behind the pay phones in the county office building is a hauntingly surreal art exhibit.At first glance, it looks like the work of children. A close inspection reveals something quite different. The artists are prisoners at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center for the criminally insane in Jessup.What the exhibit offers is an inside look at mental illness -- unsigned pictures stunning in their simplicity -- some in pencil, some in crayon.A drawing titled "The stygma (sic)
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