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By Lawrence Freeny and Lawrence Freeny,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
Soon after pianist Art Tatum began playing professionally in his hometown of Toledo, Ohio, jazz musicians whose tours included that area heard on their grapevine that he deserved a hearing.So after trumpeter Rex Stewart, along with saxophonist Coleman Hawkins and others in Fletcher Henderson's band, first heard Tatum at age 17 or 18 in a small club in 1926 or 1927, Stewart wrote:"To a man, we were astonished, gassed, and just couldn't believe our eyes and ears. How could this nearly blind young fellow extract so much beauty out of an old beat-up upright piano that looked like a relic from the Civil War?"
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2006
These picks can help take the drag out of click-and-drag music choices. Some downloads may contain explicit lyrics. All are free, except as noted. The Complete Videos, Beck, beck.com): iTunes (apple.com/itunes/videos) has a video retrospective of Beck available for downloading at $24.99 (or $1.99 each) but, aside from two live ones exclusively added for the package, all the others are viewable on his Web site. The only advantage to downloading the collection is that it provides an opportunity to view his work as a whole, a magnificent bouillabaisse of musical genres and consistently challenging imagery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2006
These picks can help take the drag out of click-and-drag music choices. Some downloads may contain explicit lyrics. All are free, except as noted. The Complete Videos, Beck, beck.com): iTunes (apple.com/itunes/videos) has a video retrospective of Beck available for downloading at $24.99 (or $1.99 each) but, aside from two live ones exclusively added for the package, all the others are viewable on his Web site. The only advantage to downloading the collection is that it provides an opportunity to view his work as a whole, a magnificent bouillabaisse of musical genres and consistently challenging imagery.
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By Lawrence Freeny and Lawrence Freeny,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
Soon after pianist Art Tatum began playing professionally in his hometown of Toledo, Ohio, jazz musicians whose tours included that area heard on their grapevine that he deserved a hearing.So after trumpeter Rex Stewart, along with saxophonist Coleman Hawkins and others in Fletcher Henderson's band, first heard Tatum at age 17 or 18 in a small club in 1926 or 1927, Stewart wrote:"To a man, we were astonished, gassed, and just couldn't believe our eyes and ears. How could this nearly blind young fellow extract so much beauty out of an old beat-up upright piano that looked like a relic from the Civil War?"
NEWS
May 9, 2004
Barney Kessel, 80, a jazz guitarist who performed with Billie Holiday, Charlie Parker and Art Tatum and backed other music greats, died of brain cancer Thursday at his San Diego home. His early style was heavily influenced by electric guitarist Charlie Christian, but he branched out in his early 20s, working with the big bands of Artie Shaw, Charlie Barnet and Benny Goodman. He was the only white musician in the 1944 jazz film Jammin' the Blues produced by Norman Granz. He served as a music ambassador during the Carter administration, becoming only the third person to be named to that office, along with Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie.
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By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Billy Taylor is at the piano. No surprise there. The instrument is such a part of him that even when he's telling a story, his fingers move as if he's playing a phantom keyboard."
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
Mel Spears, a jazz pianist who played and sang at restaurants and clubs for six decades, died of cancer Sunday at the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation and Extended Care Center on Loch Raven Boulevard. He was 78 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. Known for his renditions of "The Lady Is a Tramp," he delighted Baltimore audiences with his smooth, calm and melodic style, reminiscent at times of Nat King Cole or Fats Waller. Born Melvin Isler Spears in East Baltimore, he attended Dunbar High School.
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By JACQUES KELLY | October 8, 2005
Years ago I developed immunity to complaints that Baltimore was changing, hence, going to the dogs, fast becoming a Detroit. As a child, I sat around the kitchen table and audited stories about how the tablecloths once sold at O'Neill's were inherently superior and there was never an ice cream parlor to equal Cooper's or Doebereiner's. There was a lesson to be learned in the cranky wisdom of my elders: If something is good today, go and enjoy it now. The best stuff will not last. And, like a good memory savings account, it's nice to have something to tap into years later.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 10, 1995
Look up Roland Hanna in "The Penguin Guide to Jazz," and one of the first things you'll read is that "Bud Powell remains the single most important influence on his playing style, [though] he has also taken careful notice of Tommy Flanagan and Teddy Wilson." That, in a nutshell, is the accepted wisdom among jazz critics about Hanna's music.But it's not a view Hanna accepts."Bud Powell?" he says, slightly incredulous. "No, my individual way of playing is a conglomeration of almost everything that I've ever played.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | December 4, 1994
By Christmas, Gilbert Byron's cabin beside San Domingo Creek on the Eastern Shore should have a new address: the Pickering Creek Environmental Center, eight miles north of Easton. The frame prefab that was his Talbot County home (with extensions) from 1946 to his death in 1991 at age 87, has been in storage in St. Michaels; it will be trucked inland for a new role as part museum, part meeting center.Gilbert Byron, who was born on Thoreau's birthday, wrote poetry that pictured many a bay-scape ("Chesapeake Cove")
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
In popular memory, the 1940s are associated with a brutal world war and its aftermath. But the decade also saw a remarkable surge of artistic innovation. The works of bebop pioneer Charlie Parker, choreographer Martha Graham, composer Aaron Copland, director John Huston, to name a few, remain a powerful influence on American culture. In its 2004-2005 season, announced yesterday, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts will draw national attention to this transformational time in the nation's life.
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