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June 23, 2012
As a concerned Baltimore City school teacher, I was caught up in the City Council's deliberations regarding the bottle tax ("Bottle tax rise gains in council," June 12). I was imagining a classroom with beautiful, vibrant colors and large clear windows that allowed natural light to pass through. I thought of clean scents of newness and possibilities. I thought of how I could help my students understand that our school is an example of what is possible through hard work and perseverance.
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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
A lesbian couple married in Massachusetts filed a lawsuit this week looking for recognition of their marriage in Puerto Rico. Ada Conde and Ivonne Alvarez married in Massachusetts in 2004. Because Puerto Rico signed a law in 1999 that defined marriage as between a man and a woman, the couple's union is not recognized in the commonwealth. "We wish to enjoy the same social privileges and contractual rights that are conferred by the Commonwealth on individuals in opposite-sex marriages," Conde and Alvarez write in the lawsuit .  In the lawsuit, Conde writes that Puerto Rico's lack of recognition for her marriage prevented Alvarez from making medical decisions during Conde's daughter's heart surgery.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | November 4, 1991
Tattoo Tux stands in the middle of his electric studio and takes a deep drag on his cigarette.Surrounded by colorful stencils and strange sculptures with flickering candles, miniature Buddhas and skulls, he leans against a table and kicks at the leg.He's trying to explain his fascination with tattoos. Why did he, at age 41, after quitting the business to put himself through art school, open another tattoo parlor? Why did he, after painting still lifes and becoming fascinated with religious icons, go back to drawing dragons on men's backs?
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Southern High School student Zoe Kasprzyk describes herself as shy and quiet. Though the 17-year-old senior has held several leadership positions in school organizations such as in the Tri-M Music Honor Society and the National Arts Honor Society, she acknowledges that she struggles to express herself verbally. But Kasprzyk recently received national recognition for her preferred method of sharing her emotions. The Tracys Landing resident was named the lone recipient of the National Art Education Association's 2014 Rising Stars Secondary Recognition award for her work with oil paintings, primarily self portraits reflecting her moods.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
Hans C. Schuler, noted Baltimore sculptor and founder of an art school that bears his name, died Saturday of cancer at the Baltimore Rehabilitation and Extended Care Facility at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Northeast Baltimore. He was 86.In his art, Mr. Schuler employed the techniques of the Old Masters of the Renaissance.Examples of his work include portrait busts, commemorative medals for universities and hospitals, and architectural renderings for numerous churches and public buildings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2011
For nearly two centuries, the Maryland Institute College of Art has been known for training painters, sculptors and fashion designers. But in May, MICA broadened its course offerings, and it is preparing to confer its first master's degrees on about 200 students planning careers in fields ranging from engineering to public health to computer science. The next step: an MBA program that will start next fall and provide classroom instruction at both MICA and the Johns Hopkins University's Carey School of Business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 16, 2000
In sculpture class, the art students stand in front of wooden pedestals delicately molding the features of human faces in wet clay. The busts are remarkably lifelike. Two eyes, a nose and a mouth -- all where they should be -- and expressions that make the faces look like real people, not department-store dummies. Clear north light streams down from huge skylights. Below, the students work under the patient tutelage of an instructor who offers quiet advice and encouragement as he strides across the studio floor inspecting their work.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Baltimore school officials lobbied state lawmakers to fund an ambitious $1 billion, 10-year plan this year to modernize facilities, no one understood having a decade-long vision more than Sen. Catherine Pugh. It was about 10 years ago that Pugh felt a spark on a New York City street corner as she watched the hustle and bustle of students heading into the High School of Fashion Industries. But when she spoke of replicating such a school in Baltimore, her idea was met with veiled skepticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
A large drawing hangs behind Doreen Bolger's desk, dripping with the words "Forward in all directions. " The phrase, drawn with bleach on dark paper by Baltimore artist Colin Benjamin, has become something of a mantra for Bolger, the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art . "I like it for many reasons," Bolger said. "How do you move forward if 'forward' is in five directions?" Lately, that's just what she's been doing. For nearly two years, she has overseen the renovation of the museum's Contemporary Wing, which reopens this week.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
E. Carey Kenney, a noted Pikesville artist who headed the art department at McDonogh School for more than three decades and whose oils and watercolors were inspired by the Owings Mills campus' rolling hills and fields, died Thursday of pneumonia at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. He was 98. "Ed Kenney was a dear friend and a fabulous teacher. He was a wonderfully colorful person," said George S. Wills, a semiretired Baltimore public relations executive and painter who graduated from McDonogh in 1954.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Baltimore school officials lobbied state lawmakers to fund an ambitious $1 billion, 10-year plan this year to modernize facilities, no one understood having a decade-long vision more than Sen. Catherine Pugh. It was about 10 years ago that Pugh felt a spark on a New York City street corner as she watched the hustle and bustle of students heading into the High School of Fashion Industries. But when she spoke of replicating such a school in Baltimore, her idea was met with veiled skepticism.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Gladys C. Spare, a retired antiques dealer and artist who was a self-proclaimed Francophile, died June 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm of complications from a fall she had suffered two weeks earlier. She was 94. The daughter of a carpenter and a dressmaker, Gladys Catherine Woods was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. After graduating in 1936 from Hamilton High School, she attended an art school in New Jersey, and later at the Maryland Institute College of Art . She also studied with R. McGill Mackall, the Maryland muralist and Dickeyville resident, who died in 1982.
NEWS
By Stephen B. Awalt | June 19, 2013
Walking along Mount Royal Avenue from Maryland Institute College of Art to the University of Baltimore, what struck me most was the corridor's abject seediness: The buildings had a thick coating of decades-old industrial grime, there were strip bars across the street from the University of Baltimore, mega-sized roaches and a restroom mockup peeked out from the broad windows of the Odorite Building, prostitutes brazenly plied their trade at the...
NEWS
May 2, 2013
Fred Lazarus has made many great contributions to Baltimore, but perhaps one of his lesser known and appreciated ones is raising the bar for high quality architectural design, as represented by the Brown Center and the Gateway student dorm building on the Maryland Institute College of Art campus ("MICA's Fred Lazarus to retire in 2014 after guiding art school for 35 years," April 30). Those buildings serve as inspirations for the rest of Baltimore. Excellent design is a vital element for raising the spirits of residents, workers and visitors alike.
NEWS
April 15, 2013
The proposed partnership announced earlier this month between the University of Maryland College Park and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington is one of the more unusual ideas floated in recent years, not least because it would involve Maryland's flagship university investing in a privately owned institution located outside the state. Yet from what is known of the plan so far the potential benefits for both UM and the Corcoran could far outweigh the risks involved in such an arrangement, and for that reason it's worth exploring further.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colleen Jaskot, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Nicki Minaj wanted a cell phone case that matched her larger-than-life look - something cartoonish, with bright colors. So last year, the pop star turned to Tristan Herbert, a 23-year-old Parkville artist who makes custom covers for iPhones and Androids. Herbert spent 11 hours designing a case with a drawing of Minaj sporting long blonde hair, big hoop earrings, a belly shirt and blazer. The words "Pink Friday," the title of Minaj's first album, run alongside, and the background is, of course, pink.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | September 14, 2009
Mary C. Woodward, an artist, educator and co-founder of the Studio Art School in Bel Air, died of a massive intestinal hemorrhage Sept. 1 at Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y. She was 90. Mary Moore Chamberlain, the daughter of a carpenter and teacher, was born and raised in Brookline, Mass. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from the Massachusetts College of Art, which later awarded her an honorary bachelor's in fine arts in 1992. Mrs. Woodward was an art teacher on Cape Cod, and later in Boston, Bryn Mawr, Pa., and Providence, R.I., before moving to Bel Air in 1954.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | March 4, 2007
Jim Butcher was servicing an F-4 jet when a colonel approached him in the hangar. "I thought I'd done something wrong," Butcher said of the visit by Col. Raymond Henri in 1967. "But Colonel Henri had found out that I had art training, and he asked me if I was interested in being an artist for the military." Butcher accepted the colonel's offer and joined the Marine Corps Combat Art program, which began during World War I with battlefield sketches. The combat art program was the first of a progression of artistic endeavors for Butcher, 62, including commercial art, montages, portraits, maritime and landscape art. Spanning more than four decades, Butcher's career illustrates the twists, turns and setbacks an artist can encounter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
A large drawing hangs behind Doreen Bolger's desk, dripping with the words "Forward in all directions. " The phrase, drawn with bleach on dark paper by Baltimore artist Colin Benjamin, has become something of a mantra for Bolger, the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art . "I like it for many reasons," Bolger said. "How do you move forward if 'forward' is in five directions?" Lately, that's just what she's been doing. For nearly two years, she has overseen the renovation of the museum's Contemporary Wing, which reopens this week.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
John E. Sparks, an artist, educator and a nationally known printmaker who developed and chaired the department of printmaking at the Maryland Institute College of Art for nearly 40 years, died Aug. 2 of prostate cancer and pneumonia at Meritus Health Center in Hagerstown. The former longtime Charles Village resident was 69. "I respected John a great deal. He had, how shall I put it, a lot of attitude and I'm sure he rubbed some people the wrong way, but he was an artist," said artist Raoul Middleman.
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