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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | November 15, 1990
Rene Lalique was a bridging figure in the history of modern decorative arts, moving as he did from making exquisite jewelry in the Art Nouveau era of the 1890s to making elegant glass objects in the Art Deco era of the 1920s.His progression, as well as the legacy carried on by his son and granddaughter, can be seen in an exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Art, "Lalique: A Century of Glass for a Modern World."The earlier and more impressive half of Lalique's career, when he crafted that to-die-for Art Nouveau jewelry, was surveyed in an exhibit at The Walters Art Gallery in 1985.
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By Mike Giuliano | April 11, 2014
Identical twin sisters who have shared a lot since birth now share the Bernice Kish Gallery walls for an exhibit titled "Two Channels Off the Sea. " Leah Lewman and Lyndsay Lewman separately make artworks that explore personal identity and emotional connections. These explorations are not always on a directly autobiographical level, however, as can be seen in Leah's oil painting "The Long Goodbye. " An elderly woman on one side of the composition and an elderly man on its other side reach out toward each other.
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By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2003
NEW YORK -- Halt the competition. Yet another world-class architect has created yet another design for Ground Zero. It is futuristic in the extreme, nearly as tall as the Empire State Building, topped with a star and polychromed in tile and marble. And it resembles nothing so much as a stalagmite -- or a Buck Rogers rocket ship. The architect? Antonio Gaudi, the Barcelona visionary who was the greatest Spanish exponent of the Art Nouveau style. And the plan, for a New York hotel, was conceived in 1908.
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By Glenn Collins and Glenn Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 23, 2003
NEW YORK -- Halt the competition. Yet another world-class architect has created yet another design for Ground Zero. It is futuristic in the extreme, nearly as tall as the Empire State Building, topped with a star and polychromed in tile and marble. And it resembles nothing so much as a stalagmite -- or a Buck Rogers rocket ship. The architect? Antonio Gaudi, the Barcelona visionary who was the greatest Spanish exponent of the Art Nouveau style. And the plan, for a New York hotel, was conceived in 1908.
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By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 29, 2000
At the end of the 19th century, art and design were transformed by an exuberant new style created by an international band of young artists who wanted to change the character of European civilization. The name of the new style was art nouveau (French for "new art"), and it quickly became a worldwide movement in art, architecture and the decorative arts. Yet it lasted barely 20 years before European civilization bit back with a vengeance. Art nouveau disappeared in the cataclysm of World War I because its hopeful, romantic view of life was fundamentally at odds with the essentially tragic character of human existence that the war reasserted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | October 15, 2000
In the last decade of the 19th century, art and design were transformed by an exuberant new style created by younger artists who wanted to change the character of European civilization. "Art Nouveau: 1890-1914" at Washington's National Gallery of Art celebrates the achievement of this revolutionary modern art movement in the largest, most comprehensive exhibition ever presented on the subject, including more than 350 masterpieces in painting, sculpture, graphics, glass, ceramics, textiles, furniture, jewelry and architecture.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 27, 2000
I HAVE BEEN in the company of a great man, a man of his word, a man whose actions on Thanksgiving Day attest to, among other things, his solid Jesuit education. I am speaking of Ralph E. Moore, a graduate of Loyola High School who lost a bet after a spaghetti dinner at my house last summer and made good on it Thursday morning during Turkey Bowl 2000 at TSWTRP (The Stadium Where The Ravens Play). Readers of this column might recall that Moore engaged in an argument with Calvert Hall grad David McElroy over which team won the 1969 Turkey Bowl at Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | October 1, 2000
The biggest art nouveau show It was a style meant to reflect nature, but it was full of rococo twists and turns. It was meant to rescue design from the soullessness of the Industrial Revolution, but it was ferociously attacked by design professionals. It was supposed to appeal to the masses, but in doing so came perilously close to vulgarity. It is as easily recognized as Greek revival, baroque or moderne, but its heyday lasted barely two decades, between 1890 and 1914. Now you can see for yourself what the controversy was about, as the largest assembly ever of objects in the style called art nouveau arrives at the East Building, National Gallery of Art in Washington, straight from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and members of the Morning Features staff | December 30, 1990
Listen up, dudes.(Oops, sorry, that's out.)It's time again to distinguish between the daring and the de rigueur, to separate who's a shoo-in for stardom from who'd have to slap six cops and snare Donald Trump to get there.Ohhh, the choices boggled our minds. Would M. C. Hammer, hot pants or Evander Holyfield make our lists?Some did and some didn't. But we didn't just pick these out of thin, ozone-depleted air.Instead, we did research. Well, make that pseudo-research. We asked ourselves, "Was this something your parents would say, 'Huh?
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 4, 2000
The Walters Art Gallery recently announced good news about two of its staffers, associate director and curator of 18th- and 19th-century art William R. Johnston and Joaneath Spicer, the James A. Murnaghan curator of Renaissance and Baroque art. Johnston is the author of a new book, "Nineteenth Century Art: From Romanticism to Art Nouveau," showcasing the 19th- century paintings and sculpture purchased by William T. Walters and his son, Henry, which now...
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 27, 2000
I HAVE BEEN in the company of a great man, a man of his word, a man whose actions on Thanksgiving Day attest to, among other things, his solid Jesuit education. I am speaking of Ralph E. Moore, a graduate of Loyola High School who lost a bet after a spaghetti dinner at my house last summer and made good on it Thursday morning during Turkey Bowl 2000 at TSWTRP (The Stadium Where The Ravens Play). Readers of this column might recall that Moore engaged in an argument with Calvert Hall grad David McElroy over which team won the 1969 Turkey Bowl at Memorial Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 29, 2000
At the end of the 19th century, art and design were transformed by an exuberant new style created by an international band of young artists who wanted to change the character of European civilization. The name of the new style was art nouveau (French for "new art"), and it quickly became a worldwide movement in art, architecture and the decorative arts. Yet it lasted barely 20 years before European civilization bit back with a vengeance. Art nouveau disappeared in the cataclysm of World War I because its hopeful, romantic view of life was fundamentally at odds with the essentially tragic character of human existence that the war reasserted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | October 15, 2000
In the last decade of the 19th century, art and design were transformed by an exuberant new style created by younger artists who wanted to change the character of European civilization. "Art Nouveau: 1890-1914" at Washington's National Gallery of Art celebrates the achievement of this revolutionary modern art movement in the largest, most comprehensive exhibition ever presented on the subject, including more than 350 masterpieces in painting, sculpture, graphics, glass, ceramics, textiles, furniture, jewelry and architecture.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | October 1, 2000
The biggest art nouveau show It was a style meant to reflect nature, but it was full of rococo twists and turns. It was meant to rescue design from the soullessness of the Industrial Revolution, but it was ferociously attacked by design professionals. It was supposed to appeal to the masses, but in doing so came perilously close to vulgarity. It is as easily recognized as Greek revival, baroque or moderne, but its heyday lasted barely two decades, between 1890 and 1914. Now you can see for yourself what the controversy was about, as the largest assembly ever of objects in the style called art nouveau arrives at the East Building, National Gallery of Art in Washington, straight from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 4, 2000
The Walters Art Gallery recently announced good news about two of its staffers, associate director and curator of 18th- and 19th-century art William R. Johnston and Joaneath Spicer, the James A. Murnaghan curator of Renaissance and Baroque art. Johnston is the author of a new book, "Nineteenth Century Art: From Romanticism to Art Nouveau," showcasing the 19th- century paintings and sculpture purchased by William T. Walters and his son, Henry, which now...
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 1999
The question has been asked more than once: Which of the human arts has the strongest impact on people's lives?Music, you say; painting, literature, drama. You can take your pick, of course, follow your inclination. But remember, these are not always with you, not always there.If you visit Prague, you'll have your answer in a minute. Architecture.Prague is a thousand-year-old city, the capital of the Czech Republic in Central Europe. Unlike many other European cities, it was never reduced to rubble by war, as, say, Warsaw or Berlin were.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 11, 2014
Identical twin sisters who have shared a lot since birth now share the Bernice Kish Gallery walls for an exhibit titled "Two Channels Off the Sea. " Leah Lewman and Lyndsay Lewman separately make artworks that explore personal identity and emotional connections. These explorations are not always on a directly autobiographical level, however, as can be seen in Leah's oil painting "The Long Goodbye. " An elderly woman on one side of the composition and an elderly man on its other side reach out toward each other.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | February 6, 1994
Q: We have a porcelain jardiniere that has been in our family for at least 70 years. The mark on the bottom is "W.G. & Co. -- Limoges, France."It is 11 inches high and also 11 inches in diameter.In your opinion, what is the approximate value of our jardiniere?A: Numerous factories have made fine porcelains in Limoges, France, since the late 1700s. According to the mark on your jardiniere, it was made by Guerin-Pouyat-Elite Ltd. in the early 1900s. This firm was founded in 1870 and is still in operation.
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By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | February 6, 1994
Q: We have a porcelain jardiniere that has been in our family for at least 70 years. The mark on the bottom is "W.G. & Co. -- Limoges, France."It is 11 inches high and also 11 inches in diameter.In your opinion, what is the approximate value of our jardiniere?A: Numerous factories have made fine porcelains in Limoges, France, since the late 1700s. According to the mark on your jardiniere, it was made by Guerin-Pouyat-Elite Ltd. in the early 1900s. This firm was founded in 1870 and is still in operation.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and members of the Morning Features staff | December 30, 1990
Listen up, dudes.(Oops, sorry, that's out.)It's time again to distinguish between the daring and the de rigueur, to separate who's a shoo-in for stardom from who'd have to slap six cops and snare Donald Trump to get there.Ohhh, the choices boggled our minds. Would M. C. Hammer, hot pants or Evander Holyfield make our lists?Some did and some didn't. But we didn't just pick these out of thin, ozone-depleted air.Instead, we did research. Well, make that pseudo-research. We asked ourselves, "Was this something your parents would say, 'Huh?
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