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NEWS
June 7, 2003
Herbert W. Townsend, a retired art supply store owner and a painter, died Tuesday of a circulatory ailment at his Roland Park home. He was 93. Born in Wilmington, Del., he graduated from the Friends School in Wilmington and attended the University of Delaware, where he studied chemical engineering. He moved to Chicago in the early 1930s, and while taking courses at the Art Institute, he founded and became the principal partner in the Near North Guild, an arts supply store. He retired in the late 1970s.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 5, 2013
Baltimore City's Cylburn Arboretum is an artist's paradise, which is why painter Patricia Bennett has been drawn to the 207-acre grounds of trees and gardens since 2005. But unlike other artists who dot the landscape of the longtime city park, Bennett, of Mount Washington, now has an official reason to be there. Since January, the 36-year-old attorney's wife and busy mother of two young children has been working as Cylburn Arboretum's first-ever artist-in-residence, a program that city officials say is designed to formalize the natural connection between artists and the arboretum.
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NEWS
June 19, 1996
Joseph R. Shapiro,91, a prominent art collector and philanthropist who was the founding president of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago and an active trustee at the Art Institute of Chicago, died Sunday in Oak Park, Ill. Mr. Shapiro, who made a fortune as a developer, was considered the dean of RTC a group of idiosyncratic and dedicated Chicago art collectors whose holdings, often unusually strong in Surrealist art, rivaled New York's in quality and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Thanks to 3D printing, American society may be about to boldly go where no one has gone before. A Johns Hopkins scientist is seeking to adapt the technology to grow human jaw bones - potentially revolutionizing implant procedures. A Halethorpe entrepreneur created a 3D model of a blind woman that allowed her to "see" herself for the first time. And the technique's potential to aid visual arts and science museums is a featured part of the three-day American Alliance of Museums conference in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | September 22, 1994
Kim Wallace cannot speak. The hand gestures he uses often cannot be understood. But when the Pasadena man picks up a pencil and piece of paper, he can draw portraits that are clear and precise.Mr. Wallace's drawings will be among 300 pieces of art on display at the Maryland Institute, College of Art in a exhibit of works by adults who are mentally or emotionally disabled. The exhibit opens today and continues until Oct. 4 in the Thesis Gallery in the Fox Building on Mount Royal Avenue.The 55 artists whose works are on display are students at the Providence Art Institute in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
The artists could be forgiven if they got a little temperamental while searching for their work. After all, bedtime was quickly approaching for many of them. Proud parents and even prouder students recently flooded the opening reception for "Telling Images: Stories in Art," an exhibit of artwork by Howard County students. The show, at Howard County Center for the Arts, has more than 700 pieces made by students in kindergarten through 12th grade. "I think it's important to have this in a museum/gallery setting so the kids can see that what they do is sophisticated," said Barry Shauck, Howard County public schools instructional facilitator for the visual arts.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2001
The artists could be forgiven if they got a little temperamental while searching for their work. After all, bedtime was quickly approaching for many of them. Proud parents and even prouder students recently flooded the opening reception for "Telling Images: Stories in Art," an exhibit of artwork by Howard County students. The show, at Howard County Center for the Arts, has more than 700 pieces made by students in kindergarten through 12th grade. "I think it's important to have this in a museum/gallery setting so the kids can see that what they do is sophisticated," said Barry Shauck, Howard County public schools instructional facilitator for the visual arts.
NEWS
September 30, 1992
The Maryland Institute, College of Art may not be as famous as the Peabody School of Music but it is one of Baltimore's true cultural gems. Its undergraduate and graduate programs attract gifted students from across the country, and its alumni regularly go on to successful careers as practicing artists, arts administrators and arts educators.Yet until recently the institute enrolled relatively few minority students. For many minority students, the cost of graduate study in the fine arts was simply prohibitive.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | April 12, 1992
Getting started on spring cleaning? Are you dusting your paintings and frames with a cloth, feather duster, brush, or a hand-held vacuum cleaner? Do you use cleaning solutions or aerosols on or near your antiques?Take a break from the chores to read the newly published "Caring for Your Collections: Preserving and Protecting Your Art and Other Collectibles" (Abrams, $37.50). The book may change forever your methods of housekeeping."If dust becomes a problem, a light dusting may be carried out with a soft badger or sable brush," suggests William R. Leisher, director of conservation at the Art Institute of Chicago.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
The Maryland Institute, College of Art wants you to know: This is not a fire sale. The college does not need to sell its famed Lucas collection in order to keep its doors open. But it could accomplish great things with the millions of dollars it expects to gain.That, anyway, is the word from institute officials, who are projecting hearty confidence in their controversial decision to seek a judge's approval to sell the 20,000-piece collection of paintings, prints and sculptures first acquired by the school 85 years ago."
NEWS
April 11, 2013
It's one of the ironies of the art world that major cultural institutions like the Baltimore Museum of Art are home to priceless collections of paintings, sculpture and other works by the world's greatest masters, yet they often struggle to come up with money to fix a leaky roof, pay the electricity bill or hire staff. We'd hesitate to guess the value of the BMA's holdings, but surely the total must reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet no museum that valued its reputation could sell off a Picasso or a Matisse every time the basement flooded or a heating and air-conditioning unit failed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
Matthew Snow's Baltimore-based clothing company, Ex-Boyfriend , gets its name from that one awesome item your ex left behind after a messy break-up. Snow's designs stay true to that concept with quirky images and phrases that bring the monsters, zombies, and "foodie cuties" back to your wardrobe. Ex-Boyfriend has kept Art Institute of Pittsburgh grad Snow busy since he started the company with his wife, Meredith, in late 2005 (It became a full-time business in 2009). And the hard work has paid off; his shirts have become so popular that they've been used on "Modern Family and "Tosh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
The Walters Art Museum has been putting its stamp on the nation for more than 77 years — but never in quite the way that it's doing this holiday season. The museum's "Madonna of the Candelabra," a painting by Raphael with a romantic past, has been chosen by the U.S. Postal Service as an official Christmas stamp for 2011 and 2012. At least 600 million of the rectangular stamps with "The Walters Art Museum " printed clearly below the image are expected to end up in the mailboxes of American homes and businesses over the next 12 months, according to Postal Service officials.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
Lights parade The annual Eastport Yacht Club Lights Parade will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, in Annapolis. Event takes place rain or shine and concludes with a fireworks display. Among the entries this year are "Chesapeake Reindeer," "Holiday Star," "Doves of Peace," "Big Red Christmas," and "Santa, Rudolph and the Elves. " Information: eastportyc.org. Holiday poinsettias Orders are being taken for poinsettias to benefit the Pets on Wheels program, in which volunteers and their pets visit residents of nursing homes, hospitals and assisted-living facilities.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 18, 2009
I was in Chicago with time on my hands, and the sweet woman murmured to me - you know how this goes - "Would you like to see the Art Institute?" and I was thinking No No No God No, and I said, "Sure. Fine." "You wouldn't rather do something else?" she said. "No," I replied. That's the correct answer when a woman asks you about art. Yes, absolutely, ma cherie . What I'd rather do is watch a couple of welterweights whale on each other for 10 rounds or a lanky blond dance as she peels off her long, white gloves and unsnaps her garter, but it's 10 a.m. on a Tuesday, so into the citadel of art we go. I've been here before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Think of it as the ultimate fantasy dinner party, even though it occurred in the middle of the morning, the "food" consisted of just muffins, and there was no wine. With Debbie Chinn's arrival in the fall to become Center Stage's managing director, for the first time in history, the city's three largest arts groups are being headed entirely by women. At Center Stage, Chinn joined Irene Lewis, who has overseen the artistic direction of Baltimore's premiere regional theater for 18 years.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2001
This year's annual decorating show by the Ferndale Garden Club, "'Tis the Holiday Season," will take place Wednesday at Michael's Eighth Avenue. The program is open to the public. Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., displays and demonstration booths will be set up so participants can learn holiday decorating and entertaining tips. Christmas cookies and holiday punch will be served during this time. The formal show will begin at 8 p.m. Demonstrations will include how to make a holiday arrangement using silk flowers by Bonnie Lear, a floral designer at A.C. Moore; hands-on bow making by Barbara Barillaro from Evergreen Gene's; using rubber stamps to make homemade Christmas cards, tags and packaging items, by Almee DeGrange, a Stampin' Up demonstrator; and Maria Price-Nowakowski of Willow Oak Herb Farm, who will share ways of using herbs during the holiday.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 18, 2009
I was in Chicago with time on my hands, and the sweet woman murmured to me - you know how this goes - "Would you like to see the Art Institute?" and I was thinking No No No God No, and I said, "Sure. Fine." "You wouldn't rather do something else?" she said. "No," I replied. That's the correct answer when a woman asks you about art. Yes, absolutely, ma cherie . What I'd rather do is watch a couple of welterweights whale on each other for 10 rounds or a lanky blond dance as she peels off her long, white gloves and unsnaps her garter, but it's 10 a.m. on a Tuesday, so into the citadel of art we go. I've been here before.
TRAVEL
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
CHICAGO // How do you take a spring fling in this city without springing for an expensive vacation? First, plan to spend a lot of time outdoors and second, hope for fine weather. With spring in the air and summer just around the corner, I headed to Chicago for a $500 getaway. The plan was to meet up with my mother -- who was traveling from California -- for some sightseeing. On a clear April day, I arrived in the city as tulips blooming in a kaleidoscope of color set the tone. A dash of boosterism added to the atmosphere: Banners with Mayor Richard M. Daley's picture that proclaim, "We're Glad You're Here!"
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | January 18, 2006
A visitor to Baltimore's American Visionary Art Museum, who has been rooted in front of a painting for several minutes, turns and comments excitedly to a stranger about how much she likes the work. Immediately the pair becomes engaged in animated conversation, smiling widely, nodding, gesturing toward the artwork. Before parting, the two women hug. One of them, it turns out, is Rebecca Hoffberger, the museum's founding director. At most museums, visitors rarely bump into top staff members, much less exchange observations and warm hugs with the chief administrator.
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