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By John Dorsey | September 28, 1995
Peter Walsh, Baltimore artist, critic and curator, will lecture on the state of contemporary art in Baltimore at 8 p.m. Oct. 4 at Halcyon Gallery, 909 Fell St.Walsh has just received a $20,000 fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Called "Subversive Acts: Baltimore Aesthetics and the Role of Criticism in Tiny Town," his lecture will draw on Walsh's knowledge of the local art scene and on the essay he wrote for a show he curated at Artscape 1992.The lecture will be free and open to the public.
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Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 17, 2012
Baltimore City has been chosen as the next school district to receive a comprehensive arts-education program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the organization and city officials announced Monday. The program, "Any Given Child," will create a long-range arts education plan for Baltimore students in grades kindergarten through eight, and will be tailored specially for Baltimore city students by incorporating resources from city schools and other local arts organizations, according to a release.  The Kennedy Center will begin devising Baltimore's plan--which aims to have little administrative costs by partnering with renowned arts organizations and the local Arts Every Day program--with a comprehensive audit of arts education in city schools, which its consultants will conduct in the next six to nine months.
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NEWS
September 8, 2006
Doris W. Hofmeister, a retired Maryland National Bank employee who enjoyed cooking and baking, died of Alzheimer's disease Aug. 31 at an assisted-living facility in Tomball, Texas, where she had lived since 2004. She was 87. Anna Doris Wockenfuss was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1936 graduate of Western High School and earned a degree in art from the Maryland Institute College of Art. A longtime resident of Hillendale, she taught art in Baltimore public schools and at Gilman School.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | February 20, 2012
There are a couple of small, predictable joys that occur daily during my workweek - and probably yours. It's likely you haven't noticed them properly before, nor the subtle influence they have on your mood. Fortunately, I have penned this opinion piece to help you understand why, against all odds, you are happy in Baltimore. The first experience happens on my morning commute around 7:30; it's that initial glimpse of the Howard Street Bridge after emerging from the tunnel. There is something ridiculously uplifting about the sight of the massive, festive, green-and-yellow painted structure.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
ICAT Logistics breaks ground for building ICAT Logistics Inc. broke ground last month for its 20,646- square-foot building on Douglas Legum Drive in Elkridge. The company, near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, provides expedited transportation and logistics services. The company, which has outgrown its quarters, organizes and guarantees delivery of critical freight such as medical products, rollouts for retailers, hazardous and biological waste, trade-show booths and displays, airplane engines, helicopter blades, automotive parts and other items.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1990
Bata Land Co. Inc., a Belcamp-based industrial development company, has changed its name to BLC Properties Inc.Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. in Baltimore applied for federal Food and Drug Administration approval for clinical tests for its topical sucralfate, a medicine to heal wounds.Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore will place students or former students in part-time or free-lance assignments in fields such as graphic design, illustration, interior design, painting, sculpture, photography or crafts.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | April 8, 1994
Artist Carolyn Maynard has journeyed to beautiful locations without stepping out of her Baltimore studio.Ms. Maynard's "Landscapes: North & South" will be the exhibit at the Carroll County Arts Council Gallery, 15 E. Main St., Westminster, beginning with an artist's reception from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. It won't be surprising if people don't recognize some areas featured in Ms. Maynard's oils and watercolors."I've been working very much from inside my head," Ms. Maynard said. "Some of them [the paintings]
NEWS
August 12, 1997
JAMES E. LEWIS, who died at 74 over the weekend, was a man of many talents. He was a notable artist and sculptor and a long-time Morgan State University art professor. He was also an indefatigable collector.He oversaw the development of Morgan's gallery. He also created a home museum that boasted "probably the largest collection of African art in Baltimore," according to Frederick Lamp of the Baltimore Museum of Art.Dr. Lewis wanted more people -- particularly African Americans -- to recognize the value of collecting art created by black people.
NEWS
By Contributing writer | September 4, 1991
Was it destiny?Hilary Anne Pierce, the new executive director ofthe Carroll County Arts Council, believes so."Everything that I have ever done has led to this job," she said.Pierce, the youngest of five children, said she received a broad introduction to the arts from her "creative and charismatic" mother and father while growing up in Portland, Maine."As we were growingup, they were always doing things like buying old New England homes that needed work. I am sure that's what led to my fascination with architecture and art history and probably what led to my interest in design."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | November 9, 1994
Mr. Ian Keownc/o Gourmet Magazine560 Lexington Ave.New York, N.Y. 10022Dear Ian,I've just finished reading your piece on Baltimore in the November issue of Gourmet, and I want to congratulate you for an eye-opening look at this town.In one visit here you found out things that I would never have believed if I hadn't seen them right there in your article.Take Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director David Zinman. Boy, I want an appointment with whomever's been giving Mr. Zinman youth treatments!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
When film star Robert Redford was starting the Sundance Festival in Utah in the late 1970s, there were times when he felt like a barker outside a seedy nightclub. "Sundance was a rocky road, and there were a lot of near-fatalities along the way," Redford told about 1,000 arts administrators who gathered in Baltimore this weekend for the half-century summit of the advocacy group Americans for the Arts. "When the festival started, it was just me and two other people. We had one theater, and I'd stand by the front door and urge people to give us a try. I felt like a man who works in a strip joint saying, 'Why don't you come on in?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009
Free outdoor movies: This summer, the Johns Hopkins University is holding free outdoor movies on the Wyman Quadrangle, also known as the lower quad, all summer long. Hook shows at 8:30 p.m. Friday, with a pre-show performance by Deep Tree Mantra at 7:30 p.m. Snacks such as hamburgers, hot dogs and nachos will be for sale, and moviegoers are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and blankets. In case of rain, the film will be shown in the Shriver Hall Auditorium. The quad is on the Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. Call 410-516-4548 or go to jhu.edu/summer/films.
NEWS
September 8, 2006
Doris W. Hofmeister, a retired Maryland National Bank employee who enjoyed cooking and baking, died of Alzheimer's disease Aug. 31 at an assisted-living facility in Tomball, Texas, where she had lived since 2004. She was 87. Anna Doris Wockenfuss was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1936 graduate of Western High School and earned a degree in art from the Maryland Institute College of Art. A longtime resident of Hillendale, she taught art in Baltimore public schools and at Gilman School.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
ICAT Logistics breaks ground for building ICAT Logistics Inc. broke ground last month for its 20,646- square-foot building on Douglas Legum Drive in Elkridge. The company, near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, provides expedited transportation and logistics services. The company, which has outgrown its quarters, organizes and guarantees delivery of critical freight such as medical products, rollouts for retailers, hazardous and biological waste, trade-show booths and displays, airplane engines, helicopter blades, automotive parts and other items.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Charles William Anderson, former Owings Mills High School art department chairman who built scenes for the movie Tin Men, died Saturday of cancer at his Randallstown home. He was 61. In his 36 years with the Baltimore County school system, he taught photography and art at Sparrows Point High School and at Owings Mills. "Charles always taught with a sense of humor. He made his students - and his fellow church members - laugh often," said Bonnie Green, a friend who is a retired assistant principal of Lockerman-Bundy Elementary School in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | November 25, 2001
Many Marylanders know the cast by heart: The Meyerhoff is the home of Baltimore's symphony. Center Stage is a regional theater. The Mechanic presents Broadway-style shows, and the Lyric is for opera and touring productions. The Gilliam isn't yet such a household name, but it has the potential to be. "The Gilliam" is short for the James H. and Louise Hayley Gilliam Concert Hall. With 2,000 seats, it's the largest of several performing spaces inside the $40 million Carl J. Murphy Fine Arts Center that opens next month on the Morgan State University campus in northeast Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett | April 10, 1994
Hiram Ammons and the art of teachingHiram F. Ammons looks at buildings around Baltimore and visualizes them as institutions fit for a child.Years ago, the artist and retired teacher created an illustrated activity book for the Baltimore Zoo. He says learning about animals and the zoo through pictures and text is educational and fun for children.Now he's doing the same thing for Baltimore's Great Blacks in Wax Museum on North Avenue."I've been to the museum so many times and I thought this would be a great enrichment for the children . . . and even for the adults," he says.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
The Cone Collection, which will have its first international showing this week in Japan, was amassed by two spinsters from Baltimore who lived in cramped rooms on Eutaw Place but loved to travel the world buying art.Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone were two of 13 children born to Helen and Herman Cone, who made a fortune with a Baltimore dry-goods business and later with cotton mills in Greensboro, N.C.Claribel, more outgoing and intellectually daring than her younger sister, pursued a medical career.
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