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FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
Known as "the button lady," Amalia Amaki scours flea markets for the raw materials of her art. She deploys thousands of buttons in the artful and even scrumptious retrospective of her work that opens today at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington. Among the 73 works in this witty exhibition are more than a dozen boxes and trays of luscious chocolate candies made out of buttons and one dreamy mixed-media coconut cake. Her chocolates not only look edible, they're downright tempting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | November 4, 2004
Portraits of terror Irish artist Willie Doherty records the human reaction to terror. The work of Doherty, who was born in Derry, a Northern Ireland town in the heart of the Troubles, captures the fear and panic caused by bombings and assassinations that have characterized the conflict. He has used film installations and photography to create scenes that convey these emotions. On Wednesday, he will speak at Maryland Institute College of Art as part of its Politics of Landscape and Image lecture series.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 1, 2004
An expert in African art who has lived on that continent and studied how its leaders have used the arts to promote political and economic agendas has been hired as the Baltimore Museum of Art's curator of African art. Karen Milbourne, an assistant professor of African art history at the University of Kentucky who has organized exhibitions on the healing powers of African art and on the political aspects of African-art studies, will step into her new...
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 7, 2004
On a beautiful spring day with temperatures in the 80s, cicadas whirring and the sun shining, students can be forgiven for yearning for the end of school. But on such a day, a classroom at Howard County Community College was filled with students who had volunteered to stay indoors and study all day. The students had actually paid to take a class even though they were not working toward a degree, or even being graded on their work. Participants in the Senior Adult Summer Institute - a program run through the college and the county's Department of Recreation and Parks - were learning simply because they love to. Each spring, after the college lets out for the semester, SASI offers four daylong courses.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
As a student at Washington's H.D. Woodson High School, her teachers made sure that Sandy Bellamy learned all about the black artists, writers and performers who have contributed so much to Western culture - even if many academic textbooks and curricula ignore them. Much of her professional life has been spent ensuring other children gain a similar awareness of the diversity of our culture - a job that should become much easier, given yesterday's announcement that she has been named executive director of the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2003
Grace Hartigan held court Thursday evening at Maryland Institute College of Art's new Brown Center. It was the first time since the mid-1980's that the artist has addressed a large audience in Baltimore, and her thoughts on life, influences and art fell on the adoring ears of about 350 art students, faculty, trustees and friends. Though she wore all black and sat to the side of the stage, her colorful presence and personality seemed to fill the room. "She's a legend," said Carrie Fuclie, a MICA student who arrived before the doors opened.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2003
Near the Maryland Penitentiary's foreboding tower, a ceramic mosaic mural called And Still I Rise is being created by many hands at the St. Frances Academy Community Center. When the artwork is finished around Thanksgiving, it will decorate what is now a drab industrial wall 245 feet long and 17 feet high. The mosaic, being made by students, residents and nuns as part of a collaborative Baltimore-Philadelphia effort, is intended to provide city youths with a visual history lesson of their African-American heritage.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
This summer promises to be a season of change for many of Howard County's growing African and African-American cultural organizations. If all goes as planned, the Ellicott City Colored School will get the auto and pedestrian bridges it needs to open in September. The Howard County Center of African American Culture will relocate its adult library to Howard Community College next month; and the African Art Museum of Maryland will open a new branch in Baltimore in June. The efforts for more books, art, history that will be realized in the coming months follow years of hard work by local nonprofit groups and government agencies.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2002
Having honed the habit of achievement in the race to get into college, students are increasingly pursuing double, triple and even quadruple majors when they get there, amassing credentials they hope will show their diligence and perhaps give them an edge getting into graduate schools or landing jobs in a difficult market. Katherine Lochbrunner is one of the superachievers, graduating from Boston University last spring with a quadruple major - in Hispanic language and literature, art history, Latin and classical civilization.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
Art teachers' works to be on exhibit at Arts Council gallery The Carroll County Arts Council will feature works by Carroll County public school teachers in an exhibit opening tomorrow and running through Oct. 11. A reception for the artists will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 14 in the gallery at 15 E. Main St., Westminster. The exhibit features works by more than 20 art teachers, including Robert Anker, Ruth Aukerman, Bonnie Baber, Brigitte Delzingaro, Valerie Estes, Holly Ferraro, Stan Gilmore, Teresa Greenberg, Joyce Harrison, Mary Mark Munday, Jim Roberts, Jeff Sharp, Melodie Taylor and Christine Wenderoth.
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