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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Lincoln Fernando Johnson, an art historian, teacher and former art critic for The Sun, died Tuesday of leukemia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 80 and lived in Towson. A Goucher College professor for 35 years, he wrote his thesis on French artist Toulouse-Lautrec and lectured widely on film. In the 1960s, he was an organizer of the Maryland Film Festival, later the Film Forum. He wrote art criticism for The Sun from 1971 to 1978. "He was great fun to go to the movies with.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 9, 2008
Dr. Theodore E. Klitzke, former dean of the faculty and vice president for academic affairs at the Maryland Institute College of Art, where he had also been acting president, died Sunday of complications from a stroke at Manor Care Ruxton. He was 92. Dr. Klitzke was born and raised in Chicago. He attended the American Academy of Art in Chicago from 1934 to 1936 and earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts from the Art Institute of Chicago in 1939.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | February 2, 1999
Author and New York University film professor Manthia Diawara will be a panelist tonight for a public seminar on "Originality, Authorship and Authenticity" at the Maryland Institute, College of Art.Diawara, who edited the 1993 book "Black American Cinema," will be joined by art historian and MICA instructor Jane Elkington, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Frederick Lamp, and MICA instructor, art historian and critic Frazer Ward. Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies at MICA, will moderate the discussion.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 5, 2006
Nancy Ellen Forgione, a Johns Hopkins University faculty member who created a course on the history and art of walking, died of sepsis Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Roland Park resident was 54. Born in Baltimore and raised in Govans, she attended St. Mary of the Assumption Parochial School and was a 1970 graduate of Western High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in humanities at the Johns Hopkins University and met her future husband, Sun reporter Michael Hill, while they were students there.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 2, 1992
Theatre Project presents satires on modern life"Stealth!!!," a one-woman show by New York experimental theater artist Margo Lee Sherman, opens Wednesday at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. A satirical double bill, the evening begins with the title work, in which Sherman utilizes three stuffed dummies to tell the story of four modern New Yorkers. In the second half, "If Your Husband Wants a Dog," Sherman presents a biting analysis of marriage and gender wars.A founding member of Bread & Puppet Theater, Sherman has created 18 solo performance pieces that have been performed widely in Europe as well as New York.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | February 3, 1991
Joan Vass is not your typical designer. In past lives she's been an art historian, a columnist for Art in America, an editor at art book publisher Harry Abrams and an assistant curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Something she's always been, though, is a humanitarian. In fact, it was the knitting concern she set up as a charitable cottage industry in 1973 that led to her success today. In 1976 a friend suggested she bring some of the unusual, one-of-a-kind hats and mufflers created by her and her band of homemaker-student knitters to Henri Bendel, the toniest of tony New York department stores.
FEATURES
May 16, 1991
The work of 45 artists from the Soviet Union will be displayed in "Photo Manifesto: Contemporary Photography in the U.S.S.R," the first international exhibition mounted by the Museum for Contemporary Arts. The exhibit will run Sunday through June 21 in the former Greyhound Service Terminal, a vacated art moderne bus garage at Park and Centre streets.All of the pieces in "Photo Manifesto" -- only a few of which have been shown outside the Soviet Union -- were created during the past two years, a period of great change in the U.S.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Merle Rubin and By Merle Rubin,Special to the Sun | December 12, 1999
"Osbert Sitwell," by Philip Ziegler. Alfred A. Knopf. 464 pages. $30.It may seem hard to believe, but the Sitwells -- that trio of aristocratic sibling-aesthetes, Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell -- once enjoyed considerable esteem in the literary world. At the height of their fame, in the late 1940s, they were revered on both sides of the Atlantic. They were profiled in Life magazine. Cyril Connolly dedicated an issue of Horizon to them. Evelyn Waugh, Elizabeth Bowen and art historian Kenneth Clark were just a few of their admirers.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | August 23, 1992
ART OF THE THIRD REICH.Peter Adam.Harry Abrams.` 332 pages. $39.95.7/8 An evaluation of Nazi art is a terrific subject, and this book comes at an opportune time, on the heels of another Abrams book (and related museum exhibition), "Degenerate Art: The Fate of the Avant-Garde in Nazi Germany." Peter Adam's "Art of the Third Reich" is a good overview, although this subject calls for either an art historian, who is able to see more in art than solely the political intentions behind it, or a historical scholar, who can better describe where culture fits into a political system.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2005
Isabel S. Roberts, an art historian and patron of the arts, died of heart failure Aug. 16 at her Bolton Hill home. She was 94. She was born Isabel Spaulding in San Francisco and spent her early years in Mexico and Cuba, where her father was a mining engineer. She later moved to Philadelphia and graduated from the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. After graduating from Vassar College in 1933, she moved to New York City, where she later became head of education at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. While working there, she met and married Laurance Page Roberts, a world-renowned Asian art scholar, in 1937.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2005
Isabel S. Roberts, an art historian and patron of the arts, died of heart failure Aug. 16 at her Bolton Hill home. She was 94. She was born Isabel Spaulding in San Francisco and spent her early years in Mexico and Cuba, where her father was a mining engineer. She later moved to Philadelphia and graduated from the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pa. After graduating from Vassar College in 1933, she moved to New York City, where she later became head of education at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. While working there, she met and married Laurance Page Roberts, a world-renowned Asian art scholar, in 1937.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | March 24, 2002
Perhaps I was tired (or lazy), but to my thoroughly American eyes, the small, shadowy painting held little appeal. Called Affair de Nuit and painted by Haitian artist Guidel Presume, it depicts a threatening figure brandishing a whip as he hurries a man shrouded in white along a curving road. The work is part of an exhibition, on display through March 31 at Baltimore's Paper-Rock-Scissors gallery, that was organized by Madison Smartt Bell, author of two novels set in Haiti, All Souls' Rising, and Master of the Crossroads.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Lincoln Fernando Johnson, an art historian, teacher and former art critic for The Sun, died Tuesday of leukemia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 80 and lived in Towson. A Goucher College professor for 35 years, he wrote his thesis on French artist Toulouse-Lautrec and lectured widely on film. In the 1960s, he was an organizer of the Maryland Film Festival, later the Film Forum. He wrote art criticism for The Sun from 1971 to 1978. "He was great fun to go to the movies with.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | March 18, 2001
It's just a picture, we say. Or, just a statue. A nude woman reclines on a bed in a painting, her gaze unflinching. A giant Buddha carved in the fifth century in a sandstone mountain north of Kabul looks through a gilded mask at caravans passing in the desert. These things are not real, we think to ourselves. They are just images. But if that is true, then why do we accord them so much power? How many of us have pondered what Mona Lisa is thinking as she so enigmatically smiles? Have prayed in a church filled with images?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Merle Rubin and By Merle Rubin,Special to the Sun | December 12, 1999
"Osbert Sitwell," by Philip Ziegler. Alfred A. Knopf. 464 pages. $30.It may seem hard to believe, but the Sitwells -- that trio of aristocratic sibling-aesthetes, Edith, Osbert, and Sacheverell -- once enjoyed considerable esteem in the literary world. At the height of their fame, in the late 1940s, they were revered on both sides of the Atlantic. They were profiled in Life magazine. Cyril Connolly dedicated an issue of Horizon to them. Evelyn Waugh, Elizabeth Bowen and art historian Kenneth Clark were just a few of their admirers.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | February 2, 1999
Author and New York University film professor Manthia Diawara will be a panelist tonight for a public seminar on "Originality, Authorship and Authenticity" at the Maryland Institute, College of Art.Diawara, who edited the 1993 book "Black American Cinema," will be joined by art historian and MICA instructor Jane Elkington, Baltimore Museum of Art curator Frederick Lamp, and MICA instructor, art historian and critic Frazer Ward. Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies at MICA, will moderate the discussion.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 18, 1992
College Park -- All too often we think about art in terms of museums. That is, we see art in museums, so we think of it as having always been in museums. And what we see in museums, usually major works by big names, is what we think of as art.We tend not to reflect that for every big name from every generation there were many other artists turning out good art, and that much of it is still around. We tend not to reflect that art by and large was (and still is) made not for museums but for people to live with, in their houses, to fill their walls and give them pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 14, 1992
In the key scene in Wendy Wasserstein's "The Heidi Chronicles," the title character delivers a speech on the subject "Women, Where Are We Going?" The scene is a turning point for Heidi, who -- despite a successful career as an art historian -- suddenly realizes she cannot answre the question.The scene also encapsulates the theme of this 1989 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which is receiving a largely commendable production -- its Maryland premiere -- at the Spotlighters, under the direction of Miriam Bazensky.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 20, 1998
On a November morning in 1928, Virginia Davies, wife of artist Arthur B. Davies, answered a knock at the door of her farmhouse in upstate New York. On the doorstep stood a middle-aged woman and a teen-age girl. She had never seen them before.The woman proceeded to tell Mrs. Davies that Arthur Davies had died several weeks before in Florence, Italy, of a heart attack; that she, Edna Potter, had been with him; that she and Davies had lived together in New York City as man and wife for more than 20 years, using the name Mr. and Mrs. David A. Owen; and that the girl was their daughter, Helen Ronven "Owen," known as Ronnie.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Art came out of staid galleries and into a festive Mount Royal Avenue this weekend, allowing visitors to savor a crab cake, sip lemonade and listen to live jazz while making their critical comments.Artscape 98, the city's 17th annual celebration of literary, performance and visual arts, opened Friday and continues through today.Organizers estimated that 600,000 attended yesterday."Artscape is one of the nicest things that happens to Baltimore," said Suzanne Herbert Forton, an exhibiting artist.
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