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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | April 21, 1991
Q: How can I learn to recognize various types of art glass and to distinguish original pieces from copies? I bought what I thought was a Tiffany lamp, but it turned out to be a reproduction.A: Extensive information on art glass and its makers and marks can be found in "The Collector's Encyclopedia of American Art Glass," by John A. Shuman III, available for $31.95 postpaid from Collector Books, Box 3009, Paducah, Ky. 42002-3009; (800) 626-5420.Q: I have some old Tootsietoy cars and trucks.
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By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2009
The brain works slowly in winter. There are dozens of beautiful art-glass pieces displayed behind the bar at the Glass Grill east of Highlandtown. There are two dazzling, enormous Dale Chihuly-inspired glass sculptures hanging from the Glass Grill's ceiling. If you ask your server about these sculptures, he'll tell you that the pieces were forged by Tim McFadden, and that you're welcome to stroll over with your beer to the adjacent glassworks, a converted garage, and watch him at work. You'll notice, in a separate building, the McFadden Art Glass studios, which holds classes, demonstrations and events such as "date nights" on the first and third Friday of the month.
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NEWS
December 2, 1996
Artist Jan Mitchell has returned to Annapolis to establish the Jan R. Mitchell Art Glass and Sculpture Gallery after a 15-year sojourn in the Virgin Islands.The newly renovated gallery is located on Cornhill Street in the former Annapolis Pottery, which Mitchell and her late husband, Bryan, owned and operated for nearly 16 years.She has work on permanent display in the Smithsonian and has produced several federal commissions through the Art-in-Architecture GSA awards.Life-size bronzes for the federal courthouse and the federal building in St. Croix include Market Woman, a bronze that stands in front of the U.S. District Court and symbolizes the ancient Greek goddess of justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | August 9, 2007
For a brief, shining moment in the 1960s, Washington stood on the cutting-edge of contemporary American art. The painters of the so-called Washington Color School - Gene Davis, Kenneth Noland and Morris Louis, among others - created brilliant canvases that startled the eye and braced the spirit. But Washington Color School painting isn't the only native style to emerge from the nation's capital. A more recent group of artists, working in the medium of blown, fused, slumped, cast and cold-worked glass, can also lay claim to that distinction.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | June 29, 2007
Participating artists in the coming month-long celebration of our nation's birth might evoke a 21st-century reflection of Walt Whitman's poem, "I Hear America Singing," which concludes with "Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs." Beginning Sunday, downtown Annapolis galleries will celebrate America's spirit through paintings, graphics, ceramics, art glass and sculpture in the third annual Red, White and Blue Exhibit sponsored by the Annapolis Gallery Association. Visitors will discover artists' tributes to Independence Day that should prove as spectacular, exciting and appropriate to the occasion as any dazzling July 4th fireworks display - but far more enduring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2009
The brain works slowly in winter. There are dozens of beautiful art-glass pieces displayed behind the bar at the Glass Grill east of Highlandtown. There are two dazzling, enormous Dale Chihuly-inspired glass sculptures hanging from the Glass Grill's ceiling. If you ask your server about these sculptures, he'll tell you that the pieces were forged by Tim McFadden, and that you're welcome to stroll over with your beer to the adjacent glassworks, a converted garage, and watch him at work. You'll notice, in a separate building, the McFadden Art Glass studios, which holds classes, demonstrations and events such as "date nights" on the first and third Friday of the month.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Jon Harry Heiden, a retired church music director and collector of art glass, died of abdominal cancer Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Mr. Heiden was born and raised in Denison, Iowa. He was a graduate of the University of Northern Iowa, where he earned a bachelor's degree in music. During the late 1950s, he served in the Army and was a member of the U.S. Army Chorus. He later moved to New York City, where he continued studying and sang in choruses of Broadway musicals. In 1965, Mr. Heiden moved to Falls Church, Va., where he was director of music for 30 years at Falls Church Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
A Carroll County grand jury will decide whether to charge a Westminster artist with theft.Evidence collected in search and seizure warrants served Wednesday at several locations in the Westminster area has been presented to the grand jury, said Trooper 1st Class John Wisniewski, the investigating officer.State police said they recovered items of art glass, artist portfolios and business records that allegedly were taken from Alesia Art Glass of Millers by a former subcontractor between June and September.
FEATURES
By Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | August 8, 1993
Q: Who made my 8 1/2 -inch diameter "Peacock at the Urn" carnival-glass bowl? When it's held to the light, the center becomes a deep cobalt blue and the sides are iridescent. How much would a collector pay for it?A: Your bowl by Fenton Art Glass Co., of Williamstown, W.Va., was made circa 1910 to 1920 and could bring around $125 to $150 at auction in good condition, according to carnival-glass expert LaVeta Woody, of Woody Auction Co., P.O. Box 618, Douglass, Kan. 67039, (316) 746-2694. Its strong color makes it desirable, she explained.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | September 15, 1991
Q. The attached mark is on the bottoms of a teapot, sugar and creamer. I believe they are porcelain; they are decorated with rural scenes. I wonder if you can identify the maker and estimate their age and value.A. This mark was used by Jaeger & Co. in Marktredwitz, Germany. Your tea set was made between 1900 and 1910; it would probably sell for about $125 to $135 for the set.Q: Please provide your comments about this slipper chair; it has been in our family for years. I inherited it from my aunt.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | June 29, 2007
Participating artists in the coming month-long celebration of our nation's birth might evoke a 21st-century reflection of Walt Whitman's poem, "I Hear America Singing," which concludes with "Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs." Beginning Sunday, downtown Annapolis galleries will celebrate America's spirit through paintings, graphics, ceramics, art glass and sculpture in the third annual Red, White and Blue Exhibit sponsored by the Annapolis Gallery Association. Visitors will discover artists' tributes to Independence Day that should prove as spectacular, exciting and appropriate to the occasion as any dazzling July 4th fireworks display - but far more enduring.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Jon Harry Heiden, a retired church music director and collector of art glass, died of abdominal cancer Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Mr. Heiden was born and raised in Denison, Iowa. He was a graduate of the University of Northern Iowa, where he earned a bachelor's degree in music. During the late 1950s, he served in the Army and was a member of the U.S. Army Chorus. He later moved to New York City, where he continued studying and sang in choruses of Broadway musicals. In 1965, Mr. Heiden moved to Falls Church, Va., where he was director of music for 30 years at Falls Church Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
By Randy Kraft and Randy Kraft,ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL | September 23, 1998
MILLVILLE, N.J. -- The thermometer inside the T.C Wheaton Glass Factory hovers just over 100 degrees.Yellow flames roar like jet engines in furnaces of the circular brick stack that rises from the middle of the factory floor.The heat is too much for a few visitors, but most stay. They sit on tiered steps in a theater-like setting to watch one man create art in front of the massive stack.Blowing, shaping and reheating, pony-tailed Joe Mattson slowly and carefully turns an orange glob of glass - heated to more than 2,000 degrees and looking like a large dim light bulb - into a lovely multicolored vase with a metallic sheen.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 1, 1998
My 6 3/4 -inch cigar humidor is made out of painted glass and is marked "Wave Crest." It's off-white and decorated with flowers and leaves. A sponge can be placed in the lid to humidify the cigars inside. How old is it, and who made it?Cigar humidors are collectible no matter who made them. You have a Victorian art-glass treasure manufactured by the C. F. Monroe Glass Co. of Meriden, Conn. It is worth about $1,000.Monroe made Wave Crest ware from 1892 until some time before it closed in 1916.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
A wealth of art galleries and crafts shops dots the historic district of Annapolis, some small and cluttered, others spacious and relaxing. All welcome visitors and don't expect them to buy a thing.The exhibits, including everything from a glass kaleidoscope to 19th-century oils, range from the compelling to the curious.Although the official show time for the bountiful offering is the annual Annapolis Art Walk (5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Aug. 14), most shops are open daily, and owners encourage people to drop in year-round.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
CORNING, N.Y. - The ancient Romans outdid almost everyone in making glorious glass objects. Their Italian descendants repeated that feat twice. And while the impressive achievements of the Renaissance have been well documented, those of the mid-20th century are only now becoming widely known.The radical innovations that raised Italian glass produced between 1930 and 1970 to the highest levels can now be seen in an exhibition at the Corning Museum of Glass here in upstate New York and at two exhibitions in Manhattan.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
A wealth of art galleries and crafts shops dots the historic district of Annapolis, some small and cluttered, others spacious and relaxing. All welcome visitors and don't expect them to buy a thing.The exhibits, including everything from a glass kaleidoscope to 19th-century oils, range from the compelling to the curious.Although the official show time for the bountiful offering is the annual Annapolis Art Walk (5 p.m. to 9 p.m., Aug. 14), most shops are open daily, and owners encourage people to drop in year-round.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | August 9, 2007
For a brief, shining moment in the 1960s, Washington stood on the cutting-edge of contemporary American art. The painters of the so-called Washington Color School - Gene Davis, Kenneth Noland and Morris Louis, among others - created brilliant canvases that startled the eye and braced the spirit. But Washington Color School painting isn't the only native style to emerge from the nation's capital. A more recent group of artists, working in the medium of blown, fused, slumped, cast and cold-worked glass, can also lay claim to that distinction.
NEWS
December 2, 1996
Artist Jan Mitchell has returned to Annapolis to establish the Jan R. Mitchell Art Glass and Sculpture Gallery after a 15-year sojourn in the Virgin Islands.The newly renovated gallery is located on Cornhill Street in the former Annapolis Pottery, which Mitchell and her late husband, Bryan, owned and operated for nearly 16 years.She has work on permanent display in the Smithsonian and has produced several federal commissions through the Art-in-Architecture GSA awards.Life-size bronzes for the federal courthouse and the federal building in St. Croix include Market Woman, a bronze that stands in front of the U.S. District Court and symbolizes the ancient Greek goddess of justice.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
A Carroll County grand jury will decide whether to charge a Westminster artist with theft.Evidence collected in search and seizure warrants served Wednesday at several locations in the Westminster area has been presented to the grand jury, said Trooper 1st Class John Wisniewski, the investigating officer.State police said they recovered items of art glass, artist portfolios and business records that allegedly were taken from Alesia Art Glass of Millers by a former subcontractor between June and September.
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