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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
They've heard just about all the suggestions by now. But if you insist, you can approach members of the Rhymes with Opera ensemble Saturday at the Windup Space and offer your response to what is actually not a request. "We've had people come up to us and go, 'I've got it: Deepak Chopra,'" said Ruby Fulton, one of the Peabody Conservatory alums who founded the group. David Smooke, a composer and Peabody faculty member who teaches music theory and rock music history, has also heard his share of reactions since letting people know he wrote a work for Rhymes with Opera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
To hear Jerry Rosburg describe it, it was just like listening to Beethoven tickle the ivories or watching Monet flick the final brushstrokes as the paint was drying on canvas. When Jacoby Jones fielded a punt in the first quarter of last Sunday's 13-10 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers and weaved his way to the end zone, Rosburg, the Ravens' special teams coordinator since 2008, felt he was witnessing the making of a different kind of masterpiece. "When you see those returns come together like they have, it's a thing of beauty - it's art," he said.
NEWS
By Mike Kettelberger, Capital News Service | April 6, 2014
Ashley Gable of Pasadena paints her artwork on an unusual canvas: the human body. "I think body painting is a very challenging medium," said Gable, 21, "because it takes the 2-D work that you would put onto a canvas, and it makes it come to life. " Gable, a lifelong resident of Anne Arundel County and a Chesapeake High School graduate, creates living, breathing works of art - painting pretty much anyone who is willing to sit still for a few hours to make them resemble a character, a creature or some type of abstract design.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 6, 2012
After taping an 8- by 10-inch drawing of a Chinese dragon to a white board in an art classroom at Stevenson University, Carlson Bull handed over an iPad with the instruction to aim it at the illustration and wait for mobile augmented reality to unfold. With both hands gripping the tablet computer as if it were a steering wheel, the tester was able to "look through" the device like a window and watch, in 3-D, as the vividly colored creature peered out of a hole in the wall, glanced furtively around and gracefully flew away.
NEWS
By Photos by Monica Lopossay and Photos by Monica Lopossay,Sun photographer | May 14, 2007
The Baltimore Tattoo Museum at Eastern Avenue and Bond Street in Fells Point recently celebrated its eighth year in business. Over the years the museum has tattooed and pierced a host of Baltimoreans and kept the history of the art form on display on its walls. To see a multimedia show about the museum, go to www.baltimoresun.com/picturethis.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 1996
A LOT OF landscaping is re-representing nature in your own vision," explains Chuck Poehlman. "You see things that are naturally occurring and try to represent it."Mr. Poehlman will share his two decades of landscaping know-how this winter. On Feb. 24 and March 2, he will teach two mini-seminars to encourage thoughtful planning for residential design.The seminars will be held at Outside Unlimited, 4195 St. Paul Road, Hampstead. Each costs $5 per person or $8 per couple and are held from 10 a.m. to noon.
NEWS
By Lisa Kawata and Lisa Kawata,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2003
THROUGH THEIR shared love of dance, sisters Maansi and Raadha Raswant have found a way to connect with the spiritual and cultural roots of their ancestors in the midst of their typical teen-age American lives. After a decade of studying a classical Indian dance style called Bharatha Natyam, the North Laurel sisters invited friends and family to a late-summer graduation performance Sunday at Smith Theatre at Howard Community College in Columbia. The arangetram, or graduation, was a traditional celebration of mastering an art form precious to their culture.
NEWS
By RICHARD E. VATZ and LEE S. WEINBERG | January 17, 1993
"The inaugural address is an inferior art form . . . the platitude quotient tends to be high, the rhetoric stately and self-serving . . . and the surprises few."0$ -- Historian Arthur Schlesinger.Inaugural speeches are not -- at least not always -- what they are reputed to be: boring, platitudinous and meaningless.First let us concede that some inaugural speeches are nothing more than what rhetoricians call "cant," or vacuous and pious meandering. Take Jimmy Carter's 1977 inaugural -- please.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 19, 1999
First the good news: Alan Price's "TotaPet" is the star of "State of the Arts: Digital Media Art from Maryland" at the Howard County Center for the Arts. A computer-animated video story with sound, it's a sophisticated use of its medium and a mature work of art that's entertaining and has a serious point.On the floor of a living room stands a little cage. Its door opens and out comes a small green creature with pods for hands and feet (better than ours in some ways) and eyes on two antenna-like extensions.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
As a 5-year-old sitting on his great-grandmother's knee in the 1950s in Philadelphia, Marc Young listened patiently as she whispered in broken English the same two sentences she would come to repeat in a weekly ritual for years. "God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai. Ever since, the Jews are a special people to God," Grandma Rose would tell him in her thick Ukrainian accent while gently rubbing his forearm with hands gnarled by years of menial labor. "She wasn't so much stroking my arm as she was trying to grind her message into my chromosomes," recalled Young, a longtime Columbia resident who is now 62. The outcome of her wish - that her great-grandson take her place in passing along stories of Jewish history, culture and folklore - will be on display when he takes part in "Tales of Nature: An Afternoon of Professional Storytelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
One hundred years ago, Bohemian-born William Oktavec, a butcher by trade and a would-be artist, arrived in Baltimore from New York with his wife and young son. He set up a grocery shop at the corner of North Collington and Ashland avenues in the area known as Little Bohemia. During the summer, Oktavec installed a screen on the front door of his business and made it more than an insect deterrent. He painted it with images of the meat and vegetables available inside. Passersby could not see through the wire mesh into the shop, but anyone inside could see out as easily as if the screen were unadorned.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
The first voice in Tennessee Williams' "The Glass Menagerie" belongs to Tom Wingfield, a budding poet trapped in a boring day job. Serving as guide through the playwright's exquisitely crafted layers of memory and anxiety, Tom dispenses "truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion. " For its season-opening production of this certified classic of the American stage, Everyman Theatre has cast one of its most versatile and gifted resident artists, Clinton Brandhagen, as Tom. "I had to read the play in high school," the Calgary-born Brandhagen, 36, said, "but I never looked at it again.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
To hear Jerry Rosburg describe it, it was just like listening to Beethoven tickle the ivories or watching Monet flick the final brushstrokes as the paint was drying on canvas. When Jacoby Jones fielded a punt in the first quarter of last Sunday's 13-10 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers and weaved his way to the end zone, Rosburg, the Ravens' special teams coordinator since 2008, felt he was witnessing the making of a different kind of masterpiece. "When you see those returns come together like they have, it's a thing of beauty - it's art," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
It was a quiet night for a revolution. People at the bar in Joe Squared Station North sat huddled over drinks and conversations. Folks occasionally strolled in to pick up pizza orders or headed to dining tables in the back. Few even glanced at the small group of musicians nestled by the storefront window playing Bach. But those players, members of a national movement called Classical Revolution, soldiered on for several hours, dedicated to the cause of bringing a venerable old art form into unexpected places.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 6, 2012
After taping an 8- by 10-inch drawing of a Chinese dragon to a white board in an art classroom at Stevenson University, Carlson Bull handed over an iPad with the instruction to aim it at the illustration and wait for mobile augmented reality to unfold. With both hands gripping the tablet computer as if it were a steering wheel, the tester was able to "look through" the device like a window and watch, in 3-D, as the vividly colored creature peered out of a hole in the wall, glanced furtively around and gracefully flew away.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
In the midst of life-threatening illness, Lisa McGann turned to art for solace and renewal. At a farm field near her Bel Air home, she stumbled onto a natural medium that has formed the background for what she calls "stories." McGann burns images onto dried gourds. Her canvas can be an ordinary pumpkin or squash, or unusual gourds with names that describe their shapes - gooseneck, nest egg and cannonball - or speak to their origin, such as African kettle and Corsican. "I started telling my story on the gourds, but it's really everyone's story," said McGann, a 44-year-old mother of three.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
They've heard just about all the suggestions by now. But if you insist, you can approach members of the Rhymes with Opera ensemble Saturday at the Windup Space and offer your response to what is actually not a request. "We've had people come up to us and go, 'I've got it: Deepak Chopra,'" said Ruby Fulton, one of the Peabody Conservatory alums who founded the group. David Smooke, a composer and Peabody faculty member who teaches music theory and rock music history, has also heard his share of reactions since letting people know he wrote a work for Rhymes with Opera.
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