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By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1997
Diana Stover, Glenelg Country School's middle school art teacher, has been selected Maryland Art Educator of the Year by the National Art Education Association.The award recognizes Stover's "service and contributions to art education," according to the association."Mrs. Stover exemplifies the high quality of individuals involved in the field of art education today," said Sarah Tambucci, the association's president.Stover has taught at Glenelg Country for 20 years.Pub Date: 2/27/97
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NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is requesting that school officials brief city leaders on the extent to which students are receiving a "complete education" in their schools. Young will introduce a resolution Monday that seeks information about offerings like arts and physical education. In a release, Young said a lack of arts and physical education, or what he calls an "incomplete curriculum," has been a disservice to city students. “A focus on basic education that leaves arts education and physical education aside ignores the competencies demanded by the complex, modern world in which Baltimore City Public Schools students are expected to thrive,” Young said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 19, 2010
Alvin J. Myerberg, a Baltimore home builder and real estate developer whose philanthropic interests included health, art education and helping endow an art museum at Duke University, died of lymphoma Feb. 11 at his Owings Mills home. He was 84. Born in Baltimore, the son of a developer and a homemaker, he was raised on Labyrinth Road in Northwest Baltimore. After graduating from Charlotte Hall Military Academy in 1943, he earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1947 from Duke.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
There's a very good reason Baltimore's incoming schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, worked so hard to restore music and art programs in the Milwaukee schools during his three-year tenure as superintendent there: Kids who learn to draw, dance, play an instrument or act on stage are more focused, get better grades and score higher on standardized tests than children who don't. To his credit, Mr. Thornton apparently never considered arts instruction an unnecessary "frill" that could be cut every time there's a budget shortfall but instead recognized it for what it is: A useful and effective teaching tool that should be an essential element of the school curriculum because it increases students' desire and capacity to learn.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 4, 1998
Ruth Aukerman studied to be an English teacher in her native Germany, but marriage to an American and volunteer work at the Maryland School for the Deaf changed her career plans.She became an art teacher. Aukerman, who teaches at Elmer Wolfe and Taneytown elementary schools, recently was selected Art Educator of the Year by the Maryland Art Education Association."I wouldn't be an art teacher if not for my husband," Aukerman said of Dale, the man she met in Germany and married, and with whom she settled in Linwood, near Union Bridge.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1999
Mark Coates hasn't forgotten how to pique the interest of a teen-ager."Here's a lovely intestine," Coates said, holding up a sketch for his students gathered in the River Hill High School art room. "Wouldn't this make a cool T-shirt?"The class could go the normal route of shading cylinder and cone shapes, but that would be boring -- and Coates doesn't do boring. Instead, he has substituted drawings of brains, circuit boards and arteries for the assignment. When you're part of a select group of nationally certified teachers and the national secondary art educator of the year, you know what works.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | November 18, 1990
Like parents refusing a silly child that extra cookie, the Harford County Board of Education snubbed art education enthusiasts Monday -- kindly, but firmly.The art education supporters, who included parents and teachers, made a presentation at the board meeting Monday to press for more art instructors in public elementary schools. They argued money to expand art education in Harford schools must be found.But the school board insisted extra money for art education isn't available."It's not a question of commitment.
NEWS
April 10, 1991
The Carroll County Arts Council has announced the M. Anne Miller Scholarship for a graduating high school senior interested in a career in art education.The annual award, presented in memory of the lateCarroll County teacher, M. Anne Miller, is for $500. The money will be sent directly to the winner's college of choice for tuition or expenses.Students interested in applying for this scholarship should submit an essay of 100 or 200 words explaining their reasons for planning a career in art education.
FEATURES
By Baltimore Sun reporter | October 21, 2010
Age: 22 Hometown: Baltimore Education: Mt. Hebron High School and Penn State University Professional: NFL defensive-end/linebacker for the Buffalo Bills Community works: His charitable fund, Project Mayhem, promotes art education among inner-city youth. In February, Maybin will host his annual winter 'Celebration of the Arts,' which includes visits to local schools, an art workshop for children at area hospitals, and a benefit dinner. For more information, go to his website, aaronmaybin.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 11, 1993
"We wanted to do something to ensure that art education will be publicized," says Jeanne March Davis, "and so that theteachers and the children can see the work travel beyond their classrooms and their parents' refrigerators."That's why Ms. Davis, curator of City Hall, and her assistant, Gigi Moore, decided to open a gallery specifically and exclusively for the artwork of Baltimore City's schoolchildren. Ms. Davis and Ms. Moore, who organize six exhibits a year in City Hall's first floor Courtyard Galleries, have established their newest idea in the rotunda area one floor below, and are calling it the Circle Gallery.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Last year, Elm Creative Arts School in Milwaukee failed to live up to its name. A gallery for student artwork had become a storage area and meeting space. The performance space, dubbed the "great room" with theater-style seating, was used as an alternative route to cut down on hallway traffic. The only arts class students regularly attended was dance. The school's divergence from its mission reflected a time that Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton says students across Milwaukee's public schools were being "starved" of an educational staple.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
Elizabeth P. "Betsy" Johnson, a homemaker and former educator who had lived in Stoneleigh for many years, died Feb. 5 of influenza at the William Breman Jewish Home in Atlanta. She was 92. Mrs. Johnson, who had a home in Devon Hill in North Roland Park, had lived in Atlanta for the past three years after breaking a leg, family members said. The daughter of an attorney and a homemaker, Elizabeth Pruitt was born and raised in Hickory, N.C., where she graduated in 1938 from Hickory High School.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The concept behind the new Ruxton gallery and shop, V Fashion Towson/My Town Art Gallery, was born in the most unlikely of places: years ago, on the sidelines of a club lacrosse game. Watching her now-grown daughters play lacrosse, Valerie Heneberry was struck by a desire to celebrate her fun, active lifestyle. She knew her husband, artist Patrick Reid O'Brien, was up for the job -- and that she could help. O'Brien draws on his art education and a career in advertising to create Pop Art-inspired prints that celebrate that good life.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Paul H. Trattner, a retired Baltimore public schools art educator and webmaster who was also a noted prestidigitator and popular Santa Claus, died Aug. 28 of heart failure at his Coldspring Newtown home. He was 70. "Paul was a kind, gentle person who was a great asset to the magic fraternity," said George Goebel, a veteran Baltimore illusionist who owns A.T. Jones & Sons, the Howard Street costumer. "He was a wonderful performer and had charisma. He was also a magnificent Santa Claus.
NEWS
By Michael McGuire | June 12, 2013
When they left me outside my freshman dorm in the fall of 2009, my parents told me I could do anything. It was a wonderful compliment, a sign of confidence that made me feel just a little less guilty for the substantial investment they were making for me in a private liberal arts education. But a month or so later, when I sat down with my adviser, I realized doing "anything" wasn't an option. I had to decide on something: a major. I needed to choose a path to follow for the rest of my time at Washington and Lee. A lot of my friends already knew what their something was, and they directed four years of classes and internships toward being investment bankers in New York City or campaign managers in Alabama.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
St. Mary's College alumni are currently aware of the "crisis" in admissions, which is unfortunate and reflects a number of factors, including the admissions strategy of the new college president as well as the changing nature and economics of higher education. While this situation works itself out they are right to express concern over St. Mary's future. However, to suggest, as commentator Anne D. Neal does, that St. Mary's does not deserve to survive because of the kind of education it offers or because its curriculum is somehow inadequate, reflects a serious misunderstanding of a public liberal arts education and what the college means to its students and alumni ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30)
NEWS
October 25, 1996
Jane Stricker, an art teacher at Shipley's Choice Elementary School, will be recognized by the Maryland Art Education Association today at Towson State University's Fine Arts Building Concert Hall for outstanding service to the field of art education.Stricker is being recognized for her work as an art teacher at Shipley's Choice for 12 years and an art resource teacher in charge of the county's graphics and technology program."I was honored," she said about being notified of the award last week.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
Dr. Morris Baldwin Green Jr., 64, an art teacher and watercolorist, died Friday from complications after heart bypass surgery at Union Memorial Hospital, his family said.He retired in 1980 from Howard High School near Columbia, the school where he began his career in 1953.In 1978 he was chosen as Maryland's Teacher of the Year and in 1979 was named Howard County Teacher of the Year."I don't like the word retirement," he said. "I'm just shifting gears. I don't want to back into the grave, as Hemingway said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Mavis S. "Sherry" Sheedy, a retired Baltimore public schools art teacher and longtime museum docent, died April 4 of congestive heart failure at Carroll Hospital Center in Westminster. The Reisterstown resident was 74. The daughter of a civil engineer and a registered nurse, Mavis Sherron Grantham was born and raised in Whitney, Texas, where she graduated in 1956 from Whitney High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1960 in Spanish from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and later earned a master's degree in art education from Towson University.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 17, 2012
Baltimore City has been chosen as the next school district to receive a comprehensive arts-education program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the organization and city officials announced Monday. The program, "Any Given Child," will create a long-range arts education plan for Baltimore students in grades kindergarten through eight, and will be tailored specially for Baltimore city students by incorporating resources from city schools and other local arts organizations, according to a release.  The Kennedy Center will begin devising Baltimore's plan--which aims to have little administrative costs by partnering with renowned arts organizations and the local Arts Every Day program--with a comprehensive audit of arts education in city schools, which its consultants will conduct in the next six to nine months.
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