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NEWS
July 17, 1991
Dorothea A. Benson, 82, retired chairman of the art department at Towson Junior High School, died Sunday at her home on Valley Lane in Towson of pneumonia and cancer.Funeral services will be at 9 p.m. today at the Lemmon-Mitchell Wiedefeld funeral establishment, 10 W. Padonia Road in Timonium.Mrs. Benson retired in 1973 after teaching at the school for 20 years.After her retirement, she continued to paint scenes of Towson and northern Baltimore County.The former Dorothea A. Anderson was a native of Bethlehem, Pa., and a graduate of the Pratt Institute in New York, where she studied commercial art. She later earned a bachelor's degree at the Maryland Institute and a master's degree at Towson State University.
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NEWS
April 15, 2013
The proposed partnership announced earlier this month between the University of Maryland College Park and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington is one of the more unusual ideas floated in recent years, not least because it would involve Maryland's flagship university investing in a privately owned institution located outside the state. Yet from what is known of the plan so far the potential benefits for both UM and the Corcoran could far outweigh the risks involved in such an arrangement, and for that reason it's worth exploring further.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
Harold Edward Smith Jr., a Federal Hill artist who had been chairman of the art department at Dulaney High School for more than a decade, died of liver disease Sept. 11 at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 62. Mr. Smith, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Glyndon, was a 1960 graduate of Milford Mill High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1965 and a master's degree in fine arts in 1969, both from Maryland Institute College of Art. He began his teaching career in 1965 at Franklin High School, and when Randallstown High School opened in 1969 he became chairman of its art department.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Ann McAllister Hughes, an artist who taught art in Baltimore's public schools and had chaired the art department at Forest Park High School, died July 27 of pulmonary failure at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Randallstown resident was 83. The daughter of Dr. Singleton Bernard Hughes Sr., a physician, and Blanche Hughes, an educator, Ms. Hughes was born in Baltimore. She was raised on Druid Hill Avenue and graduated in 1946 from Frederick Douglass High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Howard University and did graduate studies at the Johns Hopkins University and what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Ann McAllister Hughes, an artist who taught art in Baltimore's public schools and had chaired the art department at Forest Park High School, died July 27 of pulmonary failure at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Randallstown resident was 83. The daughter of Dr. Singleton Bernard Hughes Sr., a physician, and Blanche Hughes, an educator, Ms. Hughes was born in Baltimore. She was raised on Druid Hill Avenue and graduated in 1946 from Frederick Douglass High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Howard University and did graduate studies at the Johns Hopkins University and what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
The dean of the Johns Hopkins University's Krieger School of Arts and Sciences has abruptly resigned after only 18 months in the position.In a statement sent by e-mail to faculty and students this week, President William R. Brody said Herbert L. Kessler left for "personal and professional reasons."An announcement of an interim or permanent replacement is expected today.Kessler, who was chairman of the history of art department before becoming dean in May 1998, refused to comment yesterday on the reasons for his resignation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1999
John Blair Mitchell, a noted painter, printmaker, photographer and former art department chairman at what is now Towson University, died Sunday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 78 and lived in Cub Hill.Mr. Mitchell joined the college's faculty in 1949 and was chairman of the art department from 1951 to 1957 and from 1963 to 1965. He coordinated the department's graduate art program from 1963 until 1991, when he retired.He worked in various media -- painting, graphics, ceramics and photography -- in his studio at home.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2006
Depicting three self-portraits on a 7-inch-by-5-inch drawing, Westminster High School sophomore Matt Miller assigned each a color with a symbolic connection: blue for depression, red for frustration and yellow for sickness. Three months after finishing the illustration, he is seeing green. In early December, Miller was selected as the winner of a nationwide contest sponsored by Tap Pharmaceuticals, the makers of the antacid Prevacid. His illustration - of how acid reflux made him feel when he suffered from the condition - earned him a $10,000 college scholarship.
NEWS
January 14, 1991
John Charles Edwards, a watercolorist and retired chairman of the art department at Southern High School, died Nov. 18 at Union Memorial Hospital after a heart attack.Mr. Edwards, who was 82 and lived in the Marylander Apartments, retired almost 20 years ago from Southern. He had earlier taught in Annapolis and in Williamsport, Pa.A native of Lansford, Pa., he was a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University, held a master's degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art and also studied privately and at the summer school of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF LTC | August 11, 1997
James E. Lewis, a prominent Baltimore artist and sculptor who devoted his life to developing the art department and gallery at Morgan State University, died Saturday of complications from a recent stroke at Genesis Nursing Home in Baltimore. He was 74.Lewis sculpted works throughout the city, including the "Black Soldier" at Battle Monument Plaza on Calvert Street and an 8-foot tall statue of Frederick Douglass on Morgan State's campus."James Lewis was one of the pioneers in the 20th century who paved the way, who provided a space for African-American artists to exhibit and show their work regularly," said Leslie King-Hammond, dean of graduate studies the Maryland Institute, College of Art. She said that every major East Coast city has had an African-American patron for art and that Mr. Lewis filled that role for Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
E. Carey Kenney, a noted Pikesville artist who headed the art department at McDonogh School for more than three decades and whose oils and watercolors were inspired by the Owings Mills campus' rolling hills and fields, died Thursday of pneumonia at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. He was 98. "Ed Kenney was a dear friend and a fabulous teacher. He was a wonderfully colorful person," said George S. Wills, a semiretired Baltimore public relations executive and painter who graduated from McDonogh in 1954.
NEWS
By MaryLee Saarbach | May 23, 2011
Cockeysville Neighborhood: Saying thanks to Sister Anne for 40 years of education excellence at St. Joseph's School The year was 1971, and a young Sister of Mercy was fufilling her dream of teaching elementary school children in Columbus, Ga. This young woman was about to embark on a journey that would be a true milestone in her life. This was the beginning of the story of Sister Anne O'Donnell, principal of St. Joseph's Parish School in Cockeysville. After 40 years of dedication to the children and school, Sister Anne will be retiring at the end of June.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2011
Robert E. Kauffman, who led Anne Arundel Community College's theater and performing arts department for 30 years, died of cancer Thursday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 73 and lived in Arnold. "We called him 'chief,'" said Peter Kaiser, the school's events manager, a former student and a friend. "You looked to him as a leader. He was articulate and held the bar high. You rose to meet it. " Mr. Kauffman was associated with about 65 productions of the school's Moonlight Troupers Drama Club.
NEWS
FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rassmussen@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
At 94, E. Carey Kenney's brush is as busy as ever, and the celebrated Pikesville artist who headed the art department at McDonogh School for 33 years before retiring in 1980 is afraid his wife might divorce him if he keeps on painting. "I've got a double garage and two rooms in the house filled with paintings. Some of them are completed and others are nearly completed," Kenney said with a laugh the other day. Kenney is excited that McDonogh School, where he began teaching in 1947, is publishing E. Carey Kenney's McDonogh this month.
NEWS
By DAVID P. GREISMAN and DAVID P. GREISMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 2006
Depicting three self-portraits on a 7-inch-by-5-inch drawing, Westminster High School sophomore Matt Miller assigned each a color with a symbolic connection: blue for depression, red for frustration and yellow for sickness. Three months after finishing the illustration, he is seeing green. In early December, Miller was selected as the winner of a nationwide contest sponsored by Tap Pharmaceuticals, the makers of the antacid Prevacid. His illustration - of how acid reflux made him feel when he suffered from the condition - earned him a $10,000 college scholarship.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
Harold Edward Smith Jr., a Federal Hill artist who had been chairman of the art department at Dulaney High School for more than a decade, died of liver disease Sept. 11 at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 62. Mr. Smith, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Glyndon, was a 1960 graduate of Milford Mill High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1965 and a master's degree in fine arts in 1969, both from Maryland Institute College of Art. He began his teaching career in 1965 at Franklin High School, and when Randallstown High School opened in 1969 he became chairman of its art department.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
Jo Van Fleet,an Academy Award-winning actress who made a career playing mothers on stage and in such films as "East of Eden" and "Cool Hand Luke," died Monday in New York.She was said to be 81, although some reference books gave her age as 76.In her first screen appearance, she won the 1955 Oscar for best supporting actress as the mother of James Dean's character in "East of Eden." Two years later, she won a Tony Award as best supporting actress for her role as Jessie Mae Watts in Horton Foote's "Trip to Bountiful."
NEWS
June 11, 2004
Robert Andrew Forsberg, a retired Baltimore County art teacher, died of respiratory failure Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Carney resident was 72. Born in Altoona, Pa., his studies at Penn State University were interrupted by his Army service during the Korean War in Germany. He returned to school and earned a bachelor's of art and a master's degree. He moved to Baltimore in 1958. He taught art, including photography, at Stemmers Run, Parkville, Sudbrook and Deer Park junior high schools.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - As an urban planning professor at the University of Maryland, Reid Ewing spends a lot of time thinking of ways to shorten people's commutes. He even wrote a report titled "Measuring Sprawl And Its Impact." Yet Ewing lives in Lighthouse Point, Fla. - which means he has to fly nearly 2,000 miles a week to go to his job at College Park. Not exactly walking to work, he acknowledges. "Yes, I have the worst commute in the world," said Ewing, who admits to being intimately familiar with the traffic patterns around Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
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