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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | January 3, 1993
Art deco has undergone so many transformations since its emergence in the 1920s that I sometimes hesitate even to use the term. There's strong interest today in the original art-deco look as well as in its myriad variations and derivations. In fact, I would argue that deco serves as the basis for the modern interior. It remains a distinctive and powerful style because of its insistence on clean, uncluttered settings, which can accommodate an eclectic blend of furnishings.Art deco was not really a new fashion when it first achieved popularity some 70 years ago. Even though it became a major component of the modern design movement, which did indeed revolutionize residential interiors, art deco's lineage can be traced back at least 200 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | May 13, 2014
At Sunday's Art Outside event, local artists and crafters will gather at Druid Hill Park in a revival of sorts of the city's free al-fresco community art festivals of the 1950s and 1960s. Among the artists will be 28-year-old Brian Behm, also a designer and musician, who returns for the second year to Art Outside (11 a.m.-5 p.m.; artoutsidemd.org ). Behm, who lives in Windsor Hills, said he will showcase some of his large-scale paintings at Art Outside, but will also have for sale some pieces he has been working on recently - sunset scenery and city skyline paintings (go to briancbehm.com for more information)
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NEWS
By David W. Dunlap and David W. Dunlap,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2001
NEW YORK - If the New York skyline has a triumvirate of great art deco contemporaries, it might be said to range from the Empire State Building to the Chrysler Building to the almost anonymous 1 Wall St., the Bank of New York. Instead of jaunty design gestures, the 50-story bank tower is subtly clad in a wall that resembles a curtain: limestone with concave facets like billowing ripples in a vast expanse of fabric. "It doesn't have the immediate pizazz of Chrysler or Empire State," allowed Jennifer J. Raab, chairwoman of the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
The venerable Lord Baltimore Hotel, last of the city's grand hostelries, is poised for a rebirth after undergoing a seven-month, multimillion-dollar restoration that celebrates its past while making it a 21st-century destination for guests and those out for a night on the town. And along with freshly painted and decorated rooms — both public and private — the Lord Baltimore, formerly the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore, has a new owner. The hotel, which has stood at the corner of Baltimore and Hanover streets since its opening in late 1928, was purchased by Rubell Hotels, whose principals are Don, Mera and Jason Rubell, in August for $10 million.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1998
After more than a decade of false starts and controversy, it appears Silver Spring will get a new $321 million "town center" filled with shops, movie theaters and offices.The deal between Montgomery County and private developers, signed yesterday during a ceremony at the heart of the renewal area, is a major step in restoring a downtown that lost employers to large office parks and customers to suburban malls.It also signals another attempt by Washington-area business and civic leaders to save an older community that has inherited many of the city's problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2003
Once a 700-seat, art deco showcase for the golden age of Hollywood, the Carroll Theatre ended up rolling films for audiences as small as one. The moviehouse was, by then, debased, split in half to offer two screens in a last-gasp battle with the multiplex at the mall. Now, 15 years after its last picture show, the theater's faM-gade is restored, its interior is refurbished, and neon shines from its rebuilt marquee. On Main Street Westminster, it is, again, showtime. The new Carroll Arts Center - which was dedicated yesterday in the first of a weekend of opening events - will be the site of art exhibits and classes, concerts and plays.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1925: Art Deco: took its name from a Paris exposition 1927: Flapper look in full swing 1937: Spam 1938: Nylon
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | August 16, 1992
Even to most Depression glass or art deco collectors, Ruba Rombic might as well be a Latin American dance or a liquor mixed with Coke. Not many folks know about this rare Cubist glassware, once called "the craziest thing ever brought out in tableware." Even fewer have seen Ruba Rombic, which was manufactured by the Consolidated Lamp and Glass Co. in Coraopolis, Pa., between 1928 and 1932 and bore small black paper labels with gold block letters proclaiming itself "an epic in modern art." It looks like sculpted blocks of ice.Ruba Rombic will be sizzling hot soon, thanks to Kevin and Barbara Kiley of West Orange, N.J. More than 350 pieces from their definitive collection of this faceted geometric glass which manipulates light and shadows will be for sale from Sept.
NEWS
March 19, 1994
BARBRA Streisand is no slouch when it comes to belting out a song. Now it turns out, she's no slouch in knowing how to profit -- heavily -- in the art world.Recently, Ms. Streisand auctioned off her Art Deco and Art Nouveau collections. The take: a staggering $5.8 million, nearly 50 percent higher than what the auctioneer, Christie's, thought the art would bring. Her biggest coup came on the sale of a 1932 painting by Art Deco artist Tamara de Lempicka for $2 million. The entertainer paid $135,000 when she bought the work 10 years ago.Sure, it helped that this was a big celebrity's personal art on the auction block.
NEWS
August 11, 2013
The Baltimore Summer Antiques Show returns to the convention center Aug. 22 for its 33rd season, and this year there are a couple of new twists. In addition to more than 575 international art and antique dealers and more than 200,000 items, the event will introduce Art Baltimore 2013, a show-within-a-show highlighting international fine-art galleries in the show, including Robert M. Quilter Fine Arts of Baltimore. This year there is a free mobile app, available for iPhones, to help visitors navigate the show floor — so large that a second entrance has been added.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 8, 2013
The sight of a few ladders outside the Senator Theatre did not prepare me for the scope of the restoration project that is transforming this Govans-Belvedere Square landmark, a Baltimore treasure being taken apart and reassembled. There will be three newly constructed boutique theaters, too, making a four-screen complex. The $3.5 million infusion of much-needed capital improvements comes not a minute too soon. The 1939 movie house is a favorite address of many film fans, but let's face it: The beloved Senator was shabby.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 23, 2012
The project manager at the former Patterson Park High School in Highlandtown stood atop a roof terrace and said, "This is not a cookie-cutter property. " That's an understatement. Shaffin Jetha and Chuck Nale, officials of Focus Development, gave me a tour of the Southeast Baltimore landmark it has taken me 50 years to visit. I wasn't procrastinating; I just never got an invitation to view this under-recognized Art Deco-style school that once accommodated 3,200 students. It is now being made into 138 apartments.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
In 1985, attorney David Snyder purchased one side of a duplex in Baltimore between the upscale neighborhoods of Roland Park and Guilford. The 1929 brick Georgian-style home had a stately exterior but would need an interior makeover. Nevertheless, Snyder said, the house was "very livable for a bachelor like me. " Unfortunately, it was a bachelor pad in the not-so-flattering sense of the term: He initially didn't improve the interior, which consists of two stories and an attic. The house, by Snyder's admission, fell into a state of disrepair, and he worked halfheartedly at fixing it up. But after the double snowstorms of February 2010 brought down his gutters and battered his slate roof, causing numerous leaks, Snyder seriously considered renovation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2012
Matthew Snow's Baltimore-based clothing company, Ex-Boyfriend , gets its name from that one awesome item your ex left behind after a messy break-up. Snow's designs stay true to that concept with quirky images and phrases that bring the monsters, zombies, and "foodie cuties" back to your wardrobe. Ex-Boyfriend has kept Art Institute of Pittsburgh grad Snow busy since he started the company with his wife, Meredith, in late 2005 (It became a full-time business in 2009). And the hard work has paid off; his shirts have become so popular that they've been used on "Modern Family and "Tosh.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
THE SENATOR THEATER is an odd relic in today's world of multiplex cinemas. It is the highest-grossing single-screen theater in Maryland, drawing about 160,000 patrons a year to its 1939 Art Deco edifice on York Road. But what is so successful today might turn out to be an economic white elephant as tastes and habits change.With a $40,000 boost from the city, the Senator is now hoping to launch its long-planned expansion. The first stage is likely to be construction of a 175-seat diner across the street from the theater.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jennifer McMenamin and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
Magician Ray-Mond Corbin was the first performer to appear at an art deco theater that opened in 1930s Westminster. He went on to play before the queen of England, Baltimore nightclub crowds and, having made his reputation in the world of illusion, generations of Carroll County schoolchildren. Mr. Corbin died Friday of complications from a broken hip at St. Luke's Mayo Clinic Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., where he kept a home. The Westminster resident was 86. A memorial service Saturday at the renovated art deco Carroll Theater is expected to draw admirers from across the county and a contingent of magicians flying from a national convention in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | February 18, 2009
A longtime merchant and property owner on Baltimore's west side plans to transform the former Kresge building on West Lexington Street and other properties into an $8 million mixed-use project anchored by a Valu Plus discount store. Baltimore Development Corp. said yesterday that it is awarding two city-owned properties in the superblock revitalization area to Carmel Realty Associates for redevelopment. Carmel will combine those properties, 109 W. Lexington St. and a vacant building at 119 Park Ave., with the three-story former Kresge's five-and-dime store at Lexington and Park, which Carmel owns.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
EASTON - It's a few hours before show time, and Carl Kasell and Susan Stamberg are in stitches. The National Public Radio news stalwarts are giggling over the script of a faux commercial for the International House of Muskrat (Where Quality Is Not an Option). They will play themselves and other characters in a wacky radio drama about a lost American Indian tribe known as the Okeydokes, trying to out-finagle Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. for a slots casino on Kent Island. The skit is part of a wisecracking performance of Radio From Downtown, the Eastern Shore's beloved radio variety show, which returned last weekend after a four-year hiatus.
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