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By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
A Howard County art dealer persuaded investors to give him at least $1.3 million in a Ponzi-style scheme that enabled him to keep his gallery afloat and buy himself expensive cars, according to court papers filed by federal prosecutors. Thomas H. Akins is scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in Baltimore today on an initial arraignment on the charges. Papers filed in the case show that he is likely to plead guilty to a single count of wire fraud. A resident of Rockville, Akins, 52, was indicted in March.
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NEWS
September 27, 2007
ANDRE EMMERICH, 82 Influential art dealer Andre Emmerich, an influential Manhattan art dealer whose gallery was an early champion of the 1950s and 1960s school of Color Field painting and who mounted shows of pre-Columbian art, died Tuesday at his Manhattan home. His wife, Susanne, who confirmed the death, said he suffered a stroke early this month. Mr. Emmerich presided over an extensive stable of American and European contemporary artists from 1954 to 1998. In addition to Color Field painters including Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler, he represented, among others, David Hockney, Sam Francis, Anthony Caro, Al Held, Herbert Ferber, Karel Appel, Pierre Alechinsky and John Hoyland.
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NEWS
December 31, 2002
William J. Tomlinson, an art dealer and appraiser who founded the Tomlinson Collection art gallery and store at Baltimore's Rotunda shopping mall, died of a heart attack Dec. 24 at Monongalia General Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va. He was 73. A former Riderwood resident, Mr. Tomlinson had lived for the past 25 years in Morgantown and was co-owner there of an art gallery, Garo-The Tomlinson Collection. He had owned the business bearing his name at the Rotunda on 40th Street. Born in Bay City, Mich.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
A Howard County art dealer who devised a Ponzi-style scheme and bilked investors out of more than $1.2 million was sentenced yesterday to 6 1/2 years in federal prison, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis had harsh words for the 52-year-old defendant, Thomas H. Akins, according to a copy of the judge's statement provided afterward. "It is difficult to find much in the way of mitigation or explanation. There is none.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
Jeffrey H. Loria, a New York art dealer and owner of a minor-league baseball team in Oklahoma City, says he is seriously considering a bid to buy the Orioles."
NEWS
September 7, 2007
A Howard County art dealer who devised a Ponzi-style scheme and bilked investors out of more than $1.2 million was sentenced yesterday to 6 1/2 years in federal prison, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis had harsh words for the 52-year-old defendant, Thomas H. Akins, according to a copy of the judge's statement provided afterward. "It is difficult to find much in the way of mitigation or explanation. There is none.
NEWS
September 27, 2007
ANDRE EMMERICH, 82 Influential art dealer Andre Emmerich, an influential Manhattan art dealer whose gallery was an early champion of the 1950s and 1960s school of Color Field painting and who mounted shows of pre-Columbian art, died Tuesday at his Manhattan home. His wife, Susanne, who confirmed the death, said he suffered a stroke early this month. Mr. Emmerich presided over an extensive stable of American and European contemporary artists from 1954 to 1998. In addition to Color Field painters including Morris Louis, Kenneth Noland and Helen Frankenthaler, he represented, among others, David Hockney, Sam Francis, Anthony Caro, Al Held, Herbert Ferber, Karel Appel, Pierre Alechinsky and John Hoyland.
FEATURES
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
The vast collection Eugene Sussel amassed during his singular career as an art dealer turns out to be worth millions.He collected some 250,000 pieces in six decades and stashed them away in warehouses -- everything from paintings valued at nearly three-quarters of a million dollars to Chinese brass candlesticks worth $5.Yesterday, as a Timonium auction house sold off some 500 of his Oriental pieces, art collectors reminisced about one of the most bizarre art...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 17, 1997
Coming next spring: John Waters' Hampden.Filming on "Pecker," the latest set-in-Baltimore Waters film, begins Monday in the North Baltimore community famous for neighborhood bars, church steeples and its blue-collar heritage.The film will star Edward Furlong, Christina Ricci, Bess Armstrong, Mary Kay Place, Martha Plimpton, Brendan Sexton III, Mink Stole and Lili Taylor."It's the story of a very strange but very functional and very loving family," says Waters. "It's the Hampden of John Waters' dreams."
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | May 11, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Elie Borowski pleaded with his Jewish parents to flee Poland from the Nazi invasion in 1939. They scoffed at the young man's warnings.He left alone and volunteered to fight in the French army. When his family was devoured in the tempest of the war, he vowed to find a way to combat hatred for his people with understanding of their culture.His solution opens today in Jerusalem, where a fortune in biblical antiquities the wealthy art dealer personally collected over 45 years goes on display in a new museum he built.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT | June 29, 2007
The Atlanta art dealers accused in a lawsuit of taking and not returning three heirloom quilts from a woman in Gee's Bend, Ala., have handed the quilts over to her attorney. After calling a news conference late Wednesday to dispute the charges, attorneys for art dealer William Arnett and his son Matt delivered the quilts to the Birmingham law office of Peter Burke. He represents Lucinda Pettway Franklin, one of the three plaintiffs in the dispute; she says the Arnetts took and held her quilts for two years.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | May 17, 2007
A Howard County art dealer persuaded investors to give him at least $1.3 million in a Ponzi-style scheme that enabled him to keep his gallery afloat and buy himself expensive cars, according to court papers filed by federal prosecutors. Thomas H. Akins is scheduled to appear in U.S. District Court in Baltimore today on an initial arraignment on the charges. Papers filed in the case show that he is likely to plead guilty to a single count of wire fraud. A resident of Rockville, Akins, 52, was indicted in March.
NEWS
December 31, 2002
William J. Tomlinson, an art dealer and appraiser who founded the Tomlinson Collection art gallery and store at Baltimore's Rotunda shopping mall, died of a heart attack Dec. 24 at Monongalia General Hospital in Morgantown, W.Va. He was 73. A former Riderwood resident, Mr. Tomlinson had lived for the past 25 years in Morgantown and was co-owner there of an art gallery, Garo-The Tomlinson Collection. He had owned the business bearing his name at the Rotunda on 40th Street. Born in Bay City, Mich.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 9, 2000
From time to time there comes a book that's compellingly readable in spite of itself. Such is "Tales from the Art Crypt: The Painters, the Museums, the Curators, the Collectors, the Auctions, the Art," by Richard Feigen (Alfred A. Knopf, 296 pages, $30). Despite my quibbles, I found it obsessingly interesting. Reading it is to eavesdrop on vivid, vicious, tireless gossip, which offers little nourishment to the heart, but feeds a voracious appetite for scandal -- and decodes much about the art market.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 24, 1999
In 1976, when the Baltimore Museum of Art was trying to purchase a new work by the Minimalist artist Donald Judd, it was New York art dealer Leo Castelli who made the impossible happen. As former BMA deputy director Brenda Richardson recalled it, the museum had recently exhibited Judd's Minimalist plywood boxes and felt strongly it should have one in its own collection. But there was a problem: Castelli, who was regarded as the most influentual dealer of his age and whose gallery was a showcase for a virtual Who's Who of talent that made New York the center of contemporary art, was selling Judd's boxes for $60,000 apiece.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
Rory Calhoun, 76, the stalwart hero of Western movies and the television series "The Texan," died Wednesday in Burbank, Calif. He had been hospitalized with advanced emphysema and diabetes.Dame Christian Howard, 82, a leader in the movement that led the Church of England to ordain women as priests, died April 22 in York, England.Melba Liston, 73, a jazz trombonist, composer and arranger who worked with bands led by Dizzy Gillespie and Quincy Jones, died April 23 in Los Angeles after suffering a series of strokes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
"Charmed Circle," by Carol Smith. Warner Books. 355 pages. $24. If only "Charmed Circle" had stuck with charm and not started running in circles.Carol Smith's second novel begins in full beach mode, on the shores of Antigua, where a young British doctor named Jo is adopted by a circle of friends who eventually become a huge part of her life. While on their annual holiday in the Caribbean, they drink, watch sunsets and idle away the time. The rest of the year, they talk and agonize about love, careers and money as most of them work hard at home and visit each other in New York, London, South Carolina and Amsterdam.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1996
Kay Merrill Hillman, a Baltimore native who became a renowned New York art dealer and collector, died Sunday in Manhattan, bequeathing art works by Joan Miro, Albert Gleizes and Mark Tobey to the Baltimore Museum of Art. She also left art by Paul Cezanne, Jasper Johns, Paul Klee and others to the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, according to family members. She was 99.The BMA will receive works that include a print by Miro, three watercolors by Gleizes, an oil by Tobey, an untitled drawing by Burgoyne Diller, a painting and a lithograph by Auguste Herbin and a painting by Maryland artist Herman Maril, said Abel Merrill, Hillman's nephew and co-executor of her estate.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1998
"Charmed Circle," by Carol Smith. Warner Books. 355 pages. $24. If only "Charmed Circle" had stuck with charm and not started running in circles.Carol Smith's second novel begins in full beach mode, on the shores of Antigua, where a young British doctor named Jo is adopted by a circle of friends who eventually become a huge part of her life. While on their annual holiday in the Caribbean, they drink, watch sunsets and idle away the time. The rest of the year, they talk and agonize about love, careers and money as most of them work hard at home and visit each other in New York, London, South Carolina and Amsterdam.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 17, 1997
Coming next spring: John Waters' Hampden.Filming on "Pecker," the latest set-in-Baltimore Waters film, begins Monday in the North Baltimore community famous for neighborhood bars, church steeples and its blue-collar heritage.The film will star Edward Furlong, Christina Ricci, Bess Armstrong, Mary Kay Place, Martha Plimpton, Brendan Sexton III, Mink Stole and Lili Taylor."It's the story of a very strange but very functional and very loving family," says Waters. "It's the Hampden of John Waters' dreams."
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