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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
Barbara Gold, a lawyer who was The Sun's art critic for 12 years, died Tuesday in her sleep of a brain tumor at her home in Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood. She was 58. As the newspaper's art critic from 1966 to 1978, she often raised the ire of local painters and sculptors with her frequently negative commentary. "She had the guts to take positions that were unfashionable," said painter Raoul Middleman of Baltimore. "Although she was often negative about the arts scene in Baltimore, in a sense she dignified it by bringing such high standards of criticism."
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FEATURES
April 14, 2008
Before there were blogs or podcasts or online chats, Baltimore journalist John Dorsey, who died Friday at age 69, made his mark the old-fashioned way -- by sheer dint of the written word. During four decades as a feature writer and critic for The Sunday Sun and The Sun, his writing had an impact not because it was instantaneous but because it was enduring. And, yet, he brought something new to the paper -- a fresh eye on art, a different way of looking at Baltimore's emerging restaurant scene and its changing urban landscape.
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FEATURES
By DANIEL GRANT | November 11, 1990
Nothing If Not Critical:Selected Essays on Art and Artists.Robert Hughes.Knopf.429 pages. $24.95. Granted, the tone of most magazine writing tends to be a bit on the sneering side, full of sarcasms and hyperbole passing for new ways of saying the same old thing, but Robert Hughes' venom seems to have no end. It also seems to have no specific basis, as the tone of almost everything emanating from Mr. Hughes, a Time magazine art critic, is one of crotchety scorn.It...
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 18, 2007
Headlines proclaiming Leon Fleisher as a teenage piano prodigy; applause rocking the theater; and a sepia record jacket announcing the pianist teaming with conductor George Szell on Mozart's 25th Piano Concerto -- these triumphal sounds and images tumble off the screen at the start of Nathaniel Kahn's Two Hands: The Leon Fleisher Story. But they swiftly give way to an empty Meyerhoff Symphony Hall with a vacant piano center-stage, as Fleisher speaks of the terrible time in 1964 when he was preparing for the most important tour of his life and he discovered that he couldn't use the fourth and fifth fingers on his right hand.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2006
As the art critic for the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Doug MacCash spent years cruising amiably through the rarified world of galleries, exhibitions, painters and sculptors. He described himself as "the guy with the plastic glass of wine, stroking my chin." Hurricane Katrina changed all that. The soft-spoken MacCash, a former museum curator who had never covered a breaking news story, found himself a year ago volunteering to venture out into the devastated city and report on what had happened.
NEWS
August 26, 2002
Emily Genauer, 91, who won a Pulitzer Prize during her decadeslong career as an art critic, died Friday in New York. Ms. Genauer, who received a degree in 1930 from Columbia University's journalism school, began her career in 1932 as a reporter and art features writer for the New York Morning World. She later became the chief art critic and editor for the New York Herald Tribune. She won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1974 as an art critic for Newsday. She later wrote for the New York Post and appeared as an art commentator on ABC and NBC before retiring about 1980.
NEWS
August 4, 2006
Newly abstract -- Howard Community College Art Gallery, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, is featuring paintings by Jeffry Cudlin through Aug. 31. Cudlin, a representational painter until recently, attributes his shift to the abstract to his work as an art critic and a collaborative project with fellow instructors at the University of Maryland. A reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. tomorrow. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 11, 1997
Much is being made of a television series by Robert Hughes, the eminent art critic, that will be shown on public broadcasting channels beginning May 28. Far more should be made of his associated book, "American Visions: The Epic History of Art in America" (Knopf. 635 pages. $65).Each of the eight elements of the TV production contains about spoken words. Each of the book's nine chapters contains about 20,000 words of splendidly fluent, lean prose. As active as Hughes and his film crew were in traveling to 100 locations the length and breadth of the land, the most important visual aids to his larger task are reproductions of art. In the book they are superbly integrated in the text, and far clearer, on fine coated stock than on a screen.
FEATURES
April 14, 2008
Before there were blogs or podcasts or online chats, Baltimore journalist John Dorsey, who died Friday at age 69, made his mark the old-fashioned way -- by sheer dint of the written word. During four decades as a feature writer and critic for The Sunday Sun and The Sun, his writing had an impact not because it was instantaneous but because it was enduring. And, yet, he brought something new to the paper -- a fresh eye on art, a different way of looking at Baltimore's emerging restaurant scene and its changing urban landscape.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 17, 1998
When Clement Greenberg was born, in 1909, modernism had taken hold in virtually all of Western culture. When he died, in 1994, it was possible to argue that modernism had run its course. Few critics - arguably none but T.S. Eliot - had greater impact on that course than Greenberg.Take "modernism" in its broadest sense: art, literature, music and whatever else you like that broke from the classic, academic, mainly representational forms that historically dominated Western artistic and intellectual work.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2006
As the art critic for the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Doug MacCash spent years cruising amiably through the rarified world of galleries, exhibitions, painters and sculptors. He described himself as "the guy with the plastic glass of wine, stroking my chin." Hurricane Katrina changed all that. The soft-spoken MacCash, a former museum curator who had never covered a breaking news story, found himself a year ago volunteering to venture out into the devastated city and report on what had happened.
NEWS
August 4, 2006
Newly abstract -- Howard Community College Art Gallery, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia, is featuring paintings by Jeffry Cudlin through Aug. 31. Cudlin, a representational painter until recently, attributes his shift to the abstract to his work as an art critic and a collaborative project with fellow instructors at the University of Maryland. A reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. tomorrow. Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 5, 2005
Michele Kong fashions intricate, gossamer sculptures out of transparent fishing line and glue that look like enormous, floor-to-ceiling spider webs. She also makes amazing, freehand ink drawings of incredible complexity, in which every stroke of pen or brush is a virtuoso performance. Kong is one of the indubitable stars of Critic's Picks: Just Looking, the lovely exhibition at Maryland Art Place inspired by the gallery's 19th annual critic's residency program. The program brings prominent critics to town each year to work with local writers and artists in organizing a show.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | February 20, 2005
Sun photographer Christopher Assaf offers insight through a close-up view of the project It is, according to no less an authority than its hometown newspaper, The New York Times, "the first great public art event of the 21st century." But since it was unveiled Feb. 12, exactly what The Gates, Central Park, New York, 1979-2005 is or is not has been much discussed: Art? Event? Sublime? Sacrilegious? Perhaps this close-up view of the project by Sun photographer Christopher Assaf will offer some insight, though the debate - presented in shorthand below - is sure to rage long after The Gates comes down beginning next Monday.
NEWS
August 26, 2002
Emily Genauer, 91, who won a Pulitzer Prize during her decadeslong career as an art critic, died Friday in New York. Ms. Genauer, who received a degree in 1930 from Columbia University's journalism school, began her career in 1932 as a reporter and art features writer for the New York Morning World. She later became the chief art critic and editor for the New York Herald Tribune. She won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1974 as an art critic for Newsday. She later wrote for the New York Post and appeared as an art commentator on ABC and NBC before retiring about 1980.
NEWS
July 21, 2001
Dismissive review mistreats local art In Glenn McNatt's stodgy review of Artscape it seemed several terms he used were also reflective of his criticisms: "embarassing mess" and "no apparent thought" ("Artscape's landscape remains cluttered," July 13). Mr. McNatt mentions words like "slipshod" and "slapdash" to describe the curatorial style of the festival, but I understand that when he took his walk through the show it had not even officially opened. Many of the artists' works were still being installed and, yes, of course the shows were a bit less than together at that time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
"The Madonna of the Future: Essays in a Pluralistic Art World," by Arthur C. Danto. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 450 pages. $32. In the era after the end of art history, writes Arthur C. Danto, art can look like anything and be made out of anything so long as it is "about" something and provided it embodies the meaning of what it is about. This is the stunningly simple hypothesis of "The Madonna of the Future," the latest volume of essays by Danto, art critic of the Nation magazine and possibly the most penetrating writer on contemporary art today.
NEWS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | February 20, 2005
Sun photographer Christopher Assaf offers insight through a close-up view of the project It is, according to no less an authority than its hometown newspaper, The New York Times, "the first great public art event of the 21st century." But since it was unveiled Feb. 12, exactly what The Gates, Central Park, New York, 1979-2005 is or is not has been much discussed: Art? Event? Sublime? Sacrilegious? Perhaps this close-up view of the project by Sun photographer Christopher Assaf will offer some insight, though the debate - presented in shorthand below - is sure to rage long after The Gates comes down beginning next Monday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Lincoln Fernando Johnson, an art historian, teacher and former art critic for The Sun, died Tuesday of leukemia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 80 and lived in Towson. A Goucher College professor for 35 years, he wrote his thesis on French artist Toulouse-Lautrec and lectured widely on film. In the 1960s, he was an organizer of the Maryland Film Festival, later the Film Forum. He wrote art criticism for The Sun from 1971 to 1978. "He was great fun to go to the movies with.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2001
LONDON - It's another hard day of performance art and clearing out of closets for Michael Landy. Dressed in a blue boiler suit and standing on a scaffold, the 37-year-old British artist is watching as his lifetime's possessions literally pass along a conveyor belt, each object destined for an industrial shredding machine. He is examining them this one last time in company with an audience of strangers. David Bowie records? To be sent to the shredder. An air intake box from a 1988 Saab 900?
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