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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Harry L. Jones, a longtime English professor at Morgan State University and an avid art collector, died Thursday of natural causes at his Waverly home in Northeast Baltimore. He was 72.Dr. Jones taught at Morgan State from 1954 to 1986 and was head of the English department in the 1970s. He specialized in English literature and had a keen knowledge of the works of Shakespeare and Middle English authors, especially Chaucer."He had a vast knowledge of everything. The man was like an encyclopedia," said Ralph Reckley, one of Dr. Jones' former students at Morgan State and the current head of the school's English department.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Charles Orestus Smith, a retired CareFirst Medicare contractor who was an avid fan of the opera and symphony, died Jan. 3 of a heart attack at his home in the Northway Apartments in Guilford. He was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised in Guilford, Mr. Smith was a 1954 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the Army and was sent to the Army Language School in Monterey, Calif., where he learned Russian. While serving in Japan, he met and married the former Yasuko Takagi in 1958.
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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Robert Paul Mann, an art collector and lawyer who during his four-decade career specialized in criminal and malpractice cases, died of respiratory failure April 6 at his Ruxton home. He was 76. Mr. Mann was born in Pittsburgh and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1931. Raised in the city's Arlington neighborhood, he was a 1947 graduate of City College. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1951 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a law degree in 1953 from the University of Maryland School of Law. He was admitted in 1954 to the Maryland bar and later to the federal bar. He began handling cases in U.S. District Court in 1965 and the U.S. Tax Court in 1976.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2000
Frances Wilke Haussner, matriarch of the venerable Highlandtown restaurant that was as revered for its Teutonic cuisine as for its eclectic art collection, died early yesterday of kidney failure at College Manor in Lutherville. She was 91 and had been in failing health. Until its closing last year, Haussner's Restaurant, which had been founded by her husband, master chef William Henry Haussner, in 1926 and where calorie counting was never in vogue, kept Baltimoreans happily stuffed with German and Maryland dishes for 73 years.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1991
Picasso at Rosecroft?Fred Weisman, the prospective new owner of Rosecroft and Delmarva racetracks, will certainly lend a new, upscale image to Maryland's moribund harness racing industry when he takes over ownership of the scandal-ridden tracks, probably in early November.The California business tycoon, variously described to be 78, 79 and 80 years old in news reports, but who wryly said yesterday that "I'm in my 70s, I think," currently has one other Maryland connection.He is a national trustee on the Board of Directors of the Baltimore Museum of Art, a friend of Maryland's noted art collector (and horse owner)
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2002
Walter H. Annenberg, the philanthropist, art collector and former ambassador to Britain who at one time presided over a vast communications empire that included TV Guide and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died yesterday in Wynnewood, Pa. He was 94 and had homes there and in California. The cause was pneumonia, according to Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Over the years, Mr. Annenberg became one of the country's biggest philanthropists, giving away more than $2 billion in cash, according to Christopher Ogden, the author of Legacy: A Biography of Moses and Walter Annenberg, to say nothing of his art donations.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Selma C. Rosen, an art collector and founder of the sales and rental art gallery at the Baltimore Museum of Art, died of dementia Saturday at her home in Providence, R.I., where she had lived for the last decade. She was 93. Mrs. Rosen and her husband, Dr. Israel Rosen, assembled one of the city's most acclaimed collections of modern art over the course of nearly half a century. She was born Selma Cohen in Baltimore, the daughter of immigrants from Lithuania and Latvia. She grew up on Fort Avenue near her father's clothing store.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
At the beginning of the 20th century, the blunt, brooding steelman Henry Clay Frick was bitterly scorned as "the most hated man in America."In the era of robber-baron industrialists, Frick embodied the public image of the cold, ruthless capitalist whose philosophy was unfettered business, whose ethos was money, whose "gospel was greed."Starting out as a sickly, blue-eyed Mennonite farm boy from western Pennsylvania, Henry Clay Frick earned his first million by the time he was 30 -- on Dec. 19, 1879 -- in the industrial coke business.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 22, 2009
Catharine C. "Kitty" Smith, a watercolorist, art collector and avid sailor, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Duncaster Lifecare Community in Bloomfield, Conn. The former longtime resident of Kerneway in Guilford was 97. Catharine Carton, the daughter of a lawyer and homemaker, was born in Chicago and raised in Lake Forest, Ill. Mrs. Smith was a 1929 graduate of the Masters School in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., and attended Miss Schoff's School in Paris from 1929 to 1930. She later attended Smith College in Northampton, Mass.
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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Robert Paul Mann, an art collector and lawyer who during his four-decade career specialized in criminal and malpractice cases, died of respiratory failure April 6 at his Ruxton home. He was 76. Mr. Mann was born in Pittsburgh and moved to Baltimore with his family in 1931. Raised in the city's Arlington neighborhood, he was a 1947 graduate of City College. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1951 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a law degree in 1953 from the University of Maryland School of Law. He was admitted in 1954 to the Maryland bar and later to the federal bar. He began handling cases in U.S. District Court in 1965 and the U.S. Tax Court in 1976.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Selma C. Rosen, an art collector and founder of the sales and rental art gallery at the Baltimore Museum of Art, died of dementia Saturday at her home in Providence, R.I., where she had lived for the last decade. She was 93. Mrs. Rosen and her husband, Dr. Israel Rosen, assembled one of the city's most acclaimed collections of modern art over the course of nearly half a century. She was born Selma Cohen in Baltimore, the daughter of immigrants from Lithuania and Latvia. She grew up on Fort Avenue near her father's clothing store.
NEWS
March 11, 2004
Jon Harry Heiden, a retired church music director and collector of art glass, died of abdominal cancer Sunday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Mr. Heiden was born and raised in Denison, Iowa. He was a graduate of the University of Northern Iowa, where he earned a bachelor's degree in music. During the late 1950s, he served in the Army and was a member of the U.S. Army Chorus. He later moved to New York City, where he continued studying and sang in choruses of Broadway musicals. In 1965, Mr. Heiden moved to Falls Church, Va., where he was director of music for 30 years at Falls Church Presbyterian Church.
NEWS
By Howard Reich and Howard Reich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2002
CHICAGO - A prominent Chicago art collector who has donated extensively to the Art Institute of Chicago has emerged at the center of a dispute over a $10 million painting by Pablo Picasso that was looted by the Nazis during World War II. Today, a California Superior Court judge will decide whether Marilynn Alsdorf, who has served as a trustee for the Museum of Contemporary Art, may temporarily keep in her possession Picasso's 1922 oil Femme en blanc (also...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2002
Walter H. Annenberg, the philanthropist, art collector and former ambassador to Britain who at one time presided over a vast communications empire that included TV Guide and The Philadelphia Inquirer, died yesterday in Wynnewood, Pa. He was 94 and had homes there and in California. The cause was pneumonia, according to Kathleen Hall Jamieson, dean of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Over the years, Mr. Annenberg became one of the country's biggest philanthropists, giving away more than $2 billion in cash, according to Christopher Ogden, the author of Legacy: A Biography of Moses and Walter Annenberg, to say nothing of his art donations.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Charles Orestus Smith, a retired CareFirst Medicare contractor who was an avid fan of the opera and symphony, died Jan. 3 of a heart attack at his home in the Northway Apartments in Guilford. He was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised in Guilford, Mr. Smith was a 1954 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the Army and was sent to the Army Language School in Monterey, Calif., where he learned Russian. While serving in Japan, he met and married the former Yasuko Takagi in 1958.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1998
Louise Porter McLaughlin, a noted art collector and a former executive secretary at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, died Sunday of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 69.A Homeland resident since 1959, Mrs. McLaughlin was for 10 years executive secretary to the chief of staff for the Psychosomatic Clinic of the Psychoanalytic Institute at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital.While working there, she met and married Dr. Francis Joseph McLaughlin, a psychoanalyst, in 1959.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 5, 2000
Elton John is widely known as a rock star, but fewer people probably are aware that in recent years he has devoted much of his energy toward assembling one the world's premier collections of vintage and contemporary photography. John's achievements as a collector are the subject of "Chorus of Light: Photographs from the Sir Elton John Collection," an exhibit currently on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The show is accompanied by a handsome catalog published by the museum in association with Rizzoli International Publications.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2000
Frances Wilke Haussner, matriarch of the venerable Highlandtown restaurant that was as revered for its Teutonic cuisine as for its eclectic art collection, died early yesterday of kidney failure at College Manor in Lutherville. She was 91 and had been in failing health. Until its closing last year, Haussner's Restaurant, which had been founded by her husband, master chef William Henry Haussner, in 1926 and where calorie counting was never in vogue, kept Baltimoreans happily stuffed with German and Maryland dishes for 73 years.
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