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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
R.I.P. Handy. It's given name was The Epicentral Shrine to the Helping Hand Vehicular, but one look at Conrad Bladey's beloved art car made it immediately clear why everyone knew it as Handy. A 1990 Pontiac Grand Am, Handy was covered front-to-back, but especially on top, with dozens of mostly bright-red fiberglass hands. No one who saw it on the streets of Baltimore, or hitting the road in its northern Anne Arundel County home of Linthicum, will ever forget the sight. Handy always made quite an impression.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
R.I.P. Handy. It's given name was The Epicentral Shrine to the Helping Hand Vehicular, but one look at Conrad Bladey's beloved art car made it immediately clear why everyone knew it as Handy. A 1990 Pontiac Grand Am, Handy was covered front-to-back, but especially on top, with dozens of mostly bright-red fiberglass hands. No one who saw it on the streets of Baltimore, or hitting the road in its northern Anne Arundel County home of Linthicum, will ever forget the sight. Handy always made quite an impression.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
A 1978 Dodge Omni plastered with bumper stickers that has been displayed yearly in Baltimore's Artscape car show since 1994 was destroyed in Linthicum early Sunday in a blaze that its owner, Conrad Bladey, said he thought was a work of art but county police suspect was arson.Just before 1 a.m. Sunday, Bladey was getting a bowl of ice cream in his house in the 400 block of Nancy Ave. when neighbors came over to tell him his "sticker car," which was parked on the street, was on fire.Bladey and his neighbors tried to extinguish the fire with garden hoses, but it wasn't until police and EMS/Fire/Rescue officials arrived that the fire was brought under control, about 1: 20 a.m., fire officials said.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
While I enjoyed Tim Smith 's article about the Art Car Show, I was sorry not to see the names of some of the hard-working people who made it possible this year ("After two decades on the road, art cars still rev up the imagination at Artscape," July 19). They include Jim Lucio, the event's outstanding visual arts coordinator, who races around all weekend doing a million jobs and sweating buckets. There's also the curator of this year's show, Julia "Jewelz" Cody, who is internationally known in art car circles.
NEWS
By Rochelle McConkie and Rochelle McConkie,sun reporter | July 20, 2007
He's a Jerry Garcia look-alike dressed in paint-splattered overalls. During the school year he teaches Irish studies classes at community colleges and at Christmastime he's a shopping mall Santa. But for all his pursuits, Conrad Bladey calls himself a "cartist," transforming old beat-up cars into wildly ornate works of art. Bladey is one of two Linthicum men who will parade their creations through Baltimore during tomorrow's 14th annual Art Car and Other Wheeled Vehicle Show as part of the huge Artscape festival.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2004
Nancy Josephson drives a minivan. You want to make something of it? Too late, she already is. So far, there is just a large plastic cow on the hood, resting in a bed of artificial grass and flowers, and a tutu-wearing egg with webbed feet on the roof. But soon there will be fish swimming on the bottom of the vehicle, animals grazing on its sides and a bevy of plastic birds flapping about on the roof, but not too high, because 74 inches is the maximum clearance for the parking garage at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
By Alex Plimack | June 29, 2008
Self-proclaimed "cartist" Conrad Bladey has been creating works of art from cars for the past 20 years in Linthicum. The extravagant vehicles have become staples at the annual Artscape, where two years ago they were sans gas engines. Bladey then sought to create a human-powered art car, what he says was the natural progression in the project. The Art Gurney, devised from a gurney bought at the Maryland State Surplus Warehouse, was decorated with buttons and paint from other car projects and serves as a memorial to a friend who passed away during its construction.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 22, 1993
If you are what you drive, what is the guy who drives a car made of grass? Yes, grass: This guy has a car made of grass. He and his wife dress up in grass suits, roll in the grass, then get up and get into their grass car and go for a drive. This is an American fact. It is true.And then the Button Man. This gentleman has an automobile covered with more than 17,000 buttons. Not campaign buttons or smile buttons or I'm-the-NRA-and-I-Vote buttons, but just old-fashioned, you know . . . buttons.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
While I enjoyed Tim Smith 's article about the Art Car Show, I was sorry not to see the names of some of the hard-working people who made it possible this year ("After two decades on the road, art cars still rev up the imagination at Artscape," July 19). They include Jim Lucio, the event's outstanding visual arts coordinator, who races around all weekend doing a million jobs and sweating buckets. There's also the curator of this year's show, Julia "Jewelz" Cody, who is internationally known in art car circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
At first glance - best shielded, given the sun's fierce glare reflected from all the chrome - the 7,500-pound, 29-feet-long "Finnjet" suggests transport for intergalactic travelers with a pronounced sense of humor. More than 80 lights and three dozen mirrors adorn the surface of this vehicle, not to mention a large model of the Space Shuttle on the roof, metal sculptures of stingrays, and a Barbie doll encased in a silver high-heeled shoe, stuck onto the lower edge of the driver's door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
At first glance - best shielded, given the sun's fierce glare reflected from all the chrome - the 7,500-pound, 29-feet-long "Finnjet" suggests transport for intergalactic travelers with a pronounced sense of humor. More than 80 lights and three dozen mirrors adorn the surface of this vehicle, not to mention a large model of the Space Shuttle on the roof, metal sculptures of stingrays, and a Barbie doll encased in a silver high-heeled shoe, stuck onto the lower edge of the driver's door.
NEWS
By Alex Plimack | June 29, 2008
Self-proclaimed "cartist" Conrad Bladey has been creating works of art from cars for the past 20 years in Linthicum. The extravagant vehicles have become staples at the annual Artscape, where two years ago they were sans gas engines. Bladey then sought to create a human-powered art car, what he says was the natural progression in the project. The Art Gurney, devised from a gurney bought at the Maryland State Surplus Warehouse, was decorated with buttons and paint from other car projects and serves as a memorial to a friend who passed away during its construction.
NEWS
By Rochelle McConkie and Rochelle McConkie,sun reporter | July 20, 2007
He's a Jerry Garcia look-alike dressed in paint-splattered overalls. During the school year he teaches Irish studies classes at community colleges and at Christmastime he's a shopping mall Santa. But for all his pursuits, Conrad Bladey calls himself a "cartist," transforming old beat-up cars into wildly ornate works of art. Bladey is one of two Linthicum men who will parade their creations through Baltimore during tomorrow's 14th annual Art Car and Other Wheeled Vehicle Show as part of the huge Artscape festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 20, 2006
Artscape, Baltimore's annual outdoor arts festival that opens tomorrow, was barely 3 years old when it spawned its first imitator, a lighthearted spoof called Foodscape, organized by some disgruntled local artists left aghast by the larger event's apparently undying devotion to food and drink. Since then, Artscape has continued to inspire spinoffs. One of the newest is aLtskape, a minifestival just across the Howard Street bridge from Artscape's Mount Royal Avenue site that offers a variety of performances and exhibitions, including the traditional art car show beloved by Baltimoreans.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2004
Nancy Josephson drives a minivan. You want to make something of it? Too late, she already is. So far, there is just a large plastic cow on the hood, resting in a bed of artificial grass and flowers, and a tutu-wearing egg with webbed feet on the roof. But soon there will be fish swimming on the bottom of the vehicle, animals grazing on its sides and a bevy of plastic birds flapping about on the roof, but not too high, because 74 inches is the maximum clearance for the parking garage at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
A 1978 Dodge Omni plastered with bumper stickers that has been displayed yearly in Baltimore's Artscape car show since 1994 was destroyed in Linthicum early Sunday in a blaze that its owner, Conrad Bladey, said he thought was a work of art but county police suspect was arson.Just before 1 a.m. Sunday, Bladey was getting a bowl of ice cream in his house in the 400 block of Nancy Ave. when neighbors came over to tell him his "sticker car," which was parked on the street, was on fire.Bladey and his neighbors tried to extinguish the fire with garden hoses, but it wasn't until police and EMS/Fire/Rescue officials arrived that the fire was brought under control, about 1: 20 a.m., fire officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 20, 2006
Artscape, Baltimore's annual outdoor arts festival that opens tomorrow, was barely 3 years old when it spawned its first imitator, a lighthearted spoof called Foodscape, organized by some disgruntled local artists left aghast by the larger event's apparently undying devotion to food and drink. Since then, Artscape has continued to inspire spinoffs. One of the newest is aLtskape, a minifestival just across the Howard Street bridge from Artscape's Mount Royal Avenue site that offers a variety of performances and exhibitions, including the traditional art car show beloved by Baltimoreans.
NEWS
July 10, 2006
We don't want to stir what may be a tempest-in-an-'87-Tercel, but the latest Artscape controversy can't be allowed to pass without comment. In case you missed it, organizers of Baltimore's annual celebration of the arts have decided that the traditional art-car rally and display won't do this year. Apparently, pasting dolls heads, CDs or dinosaurs over every square inch of a vehicle isn't quite, well, avant-garde enough. So this year, car-related entries must reflect a theme of alternative forms of transportation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 22, 1993
If you are what you drive, what is the guy who drives a car made of grass? Yes, grass: This guy has a car made of grass. He and his wife dress up in grass suits, roll in the grass, then get up and get into their grass car and go for a drive. This is an American fact. It is true.And then the Button Man. This gentleman has an automobile covered with more than 17,000 buttons. Not campaign buttons or smile buttons or I'm-the-NRA-and-I-Vote buttons, but just old-fashioned, you know . . . buttons.
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