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By LAURA CHARLES | October 2, 1991
HUMOR COLUMNIST Art Buchwald is the keynote speaker at an evening lecture for alumni and friends of Sheppard Pratt at the Peabody Conservatory Auditorium Friday night. . . .The Rev. Jesse Jackson made a surprise appearance at "Septemberfest," held by the Mid-Town Churches Community Association last Sunday afternoon on the grounds of Friends school. Jackson charmed all when he delivered an eloquent speech on homelessness.QUICK TAKES: Baltimore biz whiz Ted Herget will be officially installed as chairman of the board of directors of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce tomorrow at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. . . . Hot-air balloon rides, a story-telling ceremony by John Unitas and Tom Matte, music by Zim Zemarel and loads of other stuff including wonderful food, of course, are all being planned for the 50th anniversary of Peerce's Plantation Oct. 17. . . . Philip Evans, editor and publisher of the Annapolitan, is hosting a reception for veteran newsman (and sailor)
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- I used to wonder what the old, uh, ferrets of the newspaper business were talking about when they grew all wistful and blubbery about "the passing of an era." With the death of Art Buchwald, I no longer wonder. From at least the 1950s, he exemplified the brighter side of our business. He died last week at age 81. In June, he checked out of a hospice where he said he had grown tired of waiting to die from kidney failure. I didn't meet him until 2000, after he had suffered a stroke but had recovered well enough to resume writing his column.
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FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | May 16, 1994
When Art Buchwald started writing his memoirs, he started to lie. And lie. From the first draft through the fourth, he just couldn't tell a truthful account of his life."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Art Buchwald, the son of a curtain maker who rose to become one of the best-connected and most acerbic commentators on life and politics in America and whose wry sense of humor remained undiminished by age and illness, died late Wednesday at his son's home in Washington. He was 81 years old. A year ago, Mr. Buchwald, suffering from failing kidneys, refused the dialysis treatment doctors said would prolong his life. He entered a Washington hospice, expecting to die within a few weeks, he said then.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 1, 1996
The wretched, wistful truth is that things really were better in the Good Old Days. They were, anyway, if you had vast advantages of access, mobility and the time and appetite to indulge them all, willy-nilly, helter-skelter, and got paid rather nicely for doing so.So went the years between 1948 and 1962 for Art Buchwald. His book about all that, "I'll Always Have Paris" (Putnam's. 236 pages. $24.95) is just coming out. It should delight almost everybody it does not offend. You have to be pathologically pompous or terminally earnest to be offended.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
MARTHA'S VINEYARD, MASS. -- You're next, says the guy in the powder blue BMW pulling out of the driveway at the house with the plump yellow mailbox and performing wind chimes -- Grand Central Buchwald these days. "Some guy and his mother. Nice guy," says Art Buchwald. The before-afterlife can be hectic for a famous living columnist. Ambassadors, politicians, newspapermen, anchormen and former AOL guys in BMWs have all checked in with Buchwald. Great women, too. "Carly, this is Art," says Buchwald on the phone to his island friend Carly Simon.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | January 19, 2007
Art Buchwald, the son of a curtain maker who rose to become one of the best-connected and most acerbic commentators on life and politics in America and whose wry sense of humor remained undiminished by age and illness, died late Wednesday at his son's home in Washington. He was 81 years old. A year ago, Mr. Buchwald, suffering from failing kidneys, refused the dialysis treatment doctors said would prolong his life. He entered a Washington hospice, expecting to die within a few weeks, he said then.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer | April 9, 1991
It could have been your basic Washington power lunch -- a smattering of Cabinet officials, members of Congress, Secret Service agents, Dan Quayle, Art Buchwald, cheese puffs.But the Oriole Bird draping his arm -- uh, wing -- around Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney gave it that unmistakable Baltimore touch.And so did the ballpark franks -- a big hit with the 500 guests of Orioles owner Eli Jacobs who talked baseball and politics yesterday at a pre-game bash in the executive offices of Memorial Stadium.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 25, 1993
Three True-Life Inaugural Vignettes in Which Your Correspondent Sees Three Famous People and Learns an Important Lesson:1. I am at a fancy cocktail party that is supposed to be crowde with members of the Clinton administration, but is mostly crowded with members of the media cadging free drinks.I am standing and hugging my 7-Up, not talking to anybody, when I see Art Buchwald across the room.I have never met Art Buchwald, but from his columns and his speeches, I figure he must be a nice guy and so I go up and introduce myself.
FEATURES
By Judy Rose and Judy Rose,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 18, 1994
New York's Hebrew Orphan Asylum looked like a medieval castle in 1931, when "Pop" Buchwald and a cousin dragged four crying, struggling children out of the subway and up the hill to its doors.The men kissed the children, three girls and a boy, and then disappeared. The kids clung to each other.Art Buchwald, age 6, was entering his fifth foster home, soon to be followed by several more. Growing up as a foster child shaped his life, he writes in "Leaving Home":"I must have been 6 or 7 years old, and terribly lonely and confused, when I said something like, 'This stinks.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
MARTHA'S VINEYARD, MASS. -- You're next, says the guy in the powder blue BMW pulling out of the driveway at the house with the plump yellow mailbox and performing wind chimes -- Grand Central Buchwald these days. "Some guy and his mother. Nice guy," says Art Buchwald. The before-afterlife can be hectic for a famous living columnist. Ambassadors, politicians, newspapermen, anchormen and former AOL guys in BMWs have all checked in with Buchwald. Great women, too. "Carly, this is Art," says Buchwald on the phone to his island friend Carly Simon.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 1, 1996
The wretched, wistful truth is that things really were better in the Good Old Days. They were, anyway, if you had vast advantages of access, mobility and the time and appetite to indulge them all, willy-nilly, helter-skelter, and got paid rather nicely for doing so.So went the years between 1948 and 1962 for Art Buchwald. His book about all that, "I'll Always Have Paris" (Putnam's. 236 pages. $24.95) is just coming out. It should delight almost everybody it does not offend. You have to be pathologically pompous or terminally earnest to be offended.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | May 16, 1994
When Art Buchwald started writing his memoirs, he started to lie. And lie. From the first draft through the fourth, he just couldn't tell a truthful account of his life."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | May 15, 1994
Art Buchwald speaks on 'Humor and Medicine'Art Buchwald has been writing humor for decades, so it came as a surprise to many of his readers to discover in his 1993 memoir, "Leaving Home," just how unhappy a life he had had. He was raised in a series of orphanages and foster homes. He was hospitalized twice for severe depression. He joined the Marines at age 17 (he coaxed a street drunk to sign the necessary papers as his father), and wrote in his memoir that the Corps "was the best foster home I ever had."
FEATURES
By Judy Rose and Judy Rose,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 18, 1994
New York's Hebrew Orphan Asylum looked like a medieval castle in 1931, when "Pop" Buchwald and a cousin dragged four crying, struggling children out of the subway and up the hill to its doors.The men kissed the children, three girls and a boy, and then disappeared. The kids clung to each other.Art Buchwald, age 6, was entering his fifth foster home, soon to be followed by several more. Growing up as a foster child shaped his life, he writes in "Leaving Home":"I must have been 6 or 7 years old, and terribly lonely and confused, when I said something like, 'This stinks.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 25, 1993
Three True-Life Inaugural Vignettes in Which Your Correspondent Sees Three Famous People and Learns an Important Lesson:1. I am at a fancy cocktail party that is supposed to be crowde with members of the Clinton administration, but is mostly crowded with members of the media cadging free drinks.I am standing and hugging my 7-Up, not talking to anybody, when I see Art Buchwald across the room.I have never met Art Buchwald, but from his columns and his speeches, I figure he must be a nice guy and so I go up and introduce myself.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | May 15, 1994
Art Buchwald speaks on 'Humor and Medicine'Art Buchwald has been writing humor for decades, so it came as a surprise to many of his readers to discover in his 1993 memoir, "Leaving Home," just how unhappy a life he had had. He was raised in a series of orphanages and foster homes. He was hospitalized twice for severe depression. He joined the Marines at age 17 (he coaxed a street drunk to sign the necessary papers as his father), and wrote in his memoir that the Corps "was the best foster home I ever had."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | February 4, 1991
When was the last time you asked yourself whether you should stay with your present employer, or jump ship? asks a worthwhile article, "Working: Stay or Leave?" in Men's Health magazine this month. For answers, the article quotes people who have confronted the decision:* J. Carter Brown, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. "If you stay at a job long enough, you your efforts become cumulative. What you can do over a long period of time is to build -- whatever it is---brick by brick.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | October 2, 1991
HUMOR COLUMNIST Art Buchwald is the keynote speaker at an evening lecture for alumni and friends of Sheppard Pratt at the Peabody Conservatory Auditorium Friday night. . . .The Rev. Jesse Jackson made a surprise appearance at "Septemberfest," held by the Mid-Town Churches Community Association last Sunday afternoon on the grounds of Friends school. Jackson charmed all when he delivered an eloquent speech on homelessness.QUICK TAKES: Baltimore biz whiz Ted Herget will be officially installed as chairman of the board of directors of the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce tomorrow at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn. . . . Hot-air balloon rides, a story-telling ceremony by John Unitas and Tom Matte, music by Zim Zemarel and loads of other stuff including wonderful food, of course, are all being planned for the 50th anniversary of Peerce's Plantation Oct. 17. . . . Philip Evans, editor and publisher of the Annapolitan, is hosting a reception for veteran newsman (and sailor)
FEATURES
By Susan Baer | April 9, 1991
It could have been your basic Washington power lunch -- a smattering of Cabinet officials, members of Congress, Secret Service agents, Dan Quayle, Art Buchwald, cheese puffs.But the Oriole Bird draping his arm -- uh, wing -- around Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney gave it that unmistakable Baltimore touch.And so did the ballpark franks -- a big hit with the 500 guests of Orioles owner Eli Jacobs who talked baseball and politics yesterday at a pre-game bash in the executive offices of Memorial Stadium.
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