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By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
"I always have a sketchbook with me," says Jennifer Harris. "It's pretty much a part of my life wherever I am."That kind of dedication has paid off for the Towson High School senior, who recently won the National Art Education Association's Secondary School Art Achievement Award. That meant she was the best among hundreds of the nation's top high school artists. The same week, she received early acceptance to Yale University."Everything's coming together," Jennifer said. "It gives me a good feeling about the future.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2008
When the doors open Friday for the annual Smith College Club of Baltimore book sale at the Timonium Fairgrounds, stand clear of the bibliophiles. They may mow you down as they sprint through the exhibition hall for bargains in the military section, or the mysteries or beach reads to be found among the sale's 50,000 carefully sorted volumes. "I love that moment," says Joan Griffith, co-chair and 25-year veteran of the sale. That's when she and other volunteers can finally exult in their year-round work on the scholarship fundraiser.
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NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Anticipation built early as festival-goers gathered at the Bel Air Book Festival to have their books appraised by The Book Guys' Allan Stypeck and Mike Cuthbert. The syndicated radio show broadcast was one of dozens of activities at the festival, which was billed as an effort to promote literacy in the community. Under a large white tent at the entrance to the festival, nearly 50 people waited to have their book treasure appraised. Some unwrapped their parcels to reveal antique books with splotchy covers that the owners handled with care.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
Cecil Archer Rush, a retired government scientist who spent much of his life collecting scholarly books and art from Tibet and India, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Northwood resident was 90. Born in Dillwyn, Va., he was the son of a letter carrier who recognized his child's love of learning. The young Mr. Rush was home schooled initially and supplemented his education by having books mailed from the Richmond public library. He earned a degree in physics and chemistry from the College of William and Mary and studied for a doctorate at the University of Texas in Austin until 1940.
FEATURES
By Murray Dubin and Murray Dubin,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1993
"What do you see?" asks Noreen Scott Garrity, pointing to the painting. Hands shoot up. Voices call out."I see a boy sleeping and someone throwing up on him.""A boy sleeping and a monster beating on his head."After some gentle prodding, someone suggests that it is a sleeping boy and his guilty conscience.A guilty conscience, muses Ms. Garrity. "If you had to draw your conscience, how would you do it?""It would have blue hair, a blue face, three toes and three fingers."This is surely a widely accepted description of guilty consciences, circa 1993, because Ms. Garrity nods in assent before she and the 19 sixth-grade students are off to look at another painting.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Allan Stypeck, Anticipation built early as festivalgoers gathered at the Bel Air Book Festival to have their books appraised by the Book Guys, Allan Stypeck and Mike Cuthbert. The syndicated radio show broadcast was one of dozens of activities at the festival, which was billed as an effort to promote literacy in the community. Under a large white tent at the entrance of the festival, about 50 people waited to have their literary treasures appraised. Some unwrapped their parcels to reveal antique books with splotchy covers that the owners handled with care.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren | February 25, 1996
For the book lover, few things are as alluring as the idea of a personal library. Just think: a place to display the bound volumes of Shakespeare and Thackery, those expensive art folios, those 19th-century prints you picked up oh-so-cheap at a second-hand book stall along the Seine in Paris ...But the realities of a home can present a problem, especially if your fantasy includes placing all this in the traditional English library, complete with floor-to-ceiling shelves,...
FEATURES
By Rachel Elson and Rachel Elson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 25, 1996
For most book publishers, this is the magical season when virtually any title, from James Joyce to Jackie Collins, can be transformed from mere book to gift item.But at San Francisco-based publisher Chronicle Books, that transformation is no seasonal miracle. With a pioneering approach to both publishing and marketing, the company has made the book-as-gift a year-round art form -- and its bread and butter -- with its titles on sale in locations ranging from clothing stores to carwashes.Walk into a housewares store this season and you're likely to see "The Martini," a trim volume on the hip-again cocktail, set out beside a shaker and glasses.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2008
When the doors open Friday for the annual Smith College Club of Baltimore book sale at the Timonium Fairgrounds, stand clear of the bibliophiles. They may mow you down as they sprint through the exhibition hall for bargains in the military section, or the mysteries or beach reads to be found among the sale's 50,000 carefully sorted volumes. "I love that moment," says Joan Griffith, co-chair and 25-year veteran of the sale. That's when she and other volunteers can finally exult in their year-round work on the scholarship fundraiser.
NEWS
By George Grella | June 21, 1992
NEW YORK IN THE FIFTIES.Dan Wakefield.Houghton Mifflin.355 pages. $24.95.Every era tends to regard previous eras as works of art, which accounts for both the study of history and the sale of antiques. For a long while, it has been fashionable to dismiss the 1950s as a decade of dull conformity in which, except for the Cold War and McCarthyism, nothing of any interest occurred. To liberals the time seems an intellectual wasteland, to conservatives a sort of golden age -- Ike was in the White House, God was in his heaven, and father knew best: No wonder so few people want to talk about it.In "New York in the Fifties," however, the journalist and novelist Dan Wakefield remembers a different decade from the one imagined by superficial cultural critics or complacent politicians.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
Two of my favorite people died within a week of one another. My old newspaper colleague and friend, Carleton Jones, 84, died Dec. 29, and Ruth Snead, 91, a longtime Homeland resident who had been born in Germany, and had vivid memories of life in prewar Berlin, died the following Saturday. They were both intensely cultivated and friendly, and shared an abiding interest in the arts, books and people, especially young people.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Anticipation built early as festival-goers gathered at the Bel Air Book Festival to have their books appraised by The Book Guys' Allan Stypeck and Mike Cuthbert. The syndicated radio show broadcast was one of dozens of activities at the festival, which was billed as an effort to promote literacy in the community. Under a large white tent at the entrance to the festival, nearly 50 people waited to have their book treasure appraised. Some unwrapped their parcels to reveal antique books with splotchy covers that the owners handled with care.
NEWS
By Patrick Tyler and Patrick Tyler,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Allan Stypeck, Anticipation built early as festivalgoers gathered at the Bel Air Book Festival to have their books appraised by the Book Guys, Allan Stypeck and Mike Cuthbert. The syndicated radio show broadcast was one of dozens of activities at the festival, which was billed as an effort to promote literacy in the community. Under a large white tent at the entrance of the festival, about 50 people waited to have their literary treasures appraised. Some unwrapped their parcels to reveal antique books with splotchy covers that the owners handled with care.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
Tracy Kidder has written his sixth book, Mountains Beyond Mountains (Random House, 317 pages, $25.95). That is good news, because each of the first five is a well-reported, compellingly written nonfiction work on an important topic. Unlike the first five, the new book bounces all over the Earth, as Kidder chronicles the travels of Paul Farmer on the way to writing an innovative biography. Farmer is hard to describe quickly, but for starters you should know that he is a 44-year-old Harvard University medical doctor and Ph.D.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. P. McIntyre and By J. P. McIntyre,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
When my classmates demand that I defend filing Daredevil next to Dante, I can only stammer. I am hard-pressed to say that comic books aren't meant for kids. Their numbers swell with corny superhero stories. The characters' gaudy costumes and mystifying abilities give the average comic as much artistic credibility as a summer action flick. A comic book even resembles the storyboards filmmakers churn out. What are comic books if not movies that weren't good enough to get made? The word "comic" has been stretched beyond capacity, describing both works lighthearted and grim, works spanning a few panels to a few hundred pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
Murdering English-language poets has gone out of style since the days of Christopher Marlowe (in barroom brawl) and Fulke Greville (by enraged employee). Good thing. Poetry is divided into ferociously hostile enemy camps. American poetry wars circa 2002 resemble actual combat in several important ways: * It's hard for noncombatants to understand the battle lines. * Most of the warring camps' passionately held premises are false. * People get hurt. Particularly visible among the poetry-war camps: "Performed poetry" vs. "read poetry"; "formal" vs. free-form poetry; African-American / urban poetry vs. European-American / suburban poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 26, 2000
I have been to Ireland time and again for much of my life, listening, writing, savoring the joys of a country I love -- and trying to understand things that defy understanding. Thoughts of Ireland sent me back almost 20 years the other day, to a passage in a long series of articles I wrote in 1981: "At every corner on the island of Ireland, history is both witness and judge, the accuser and the accused. It intrudes, first as an engaging, often lyric, counterpoint to all other subjects.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
Two of my favorite people died within a week of one another. My old newspaper colleague and friend, Carleton Jones, 84, died Dec. 29, and Ruth Snead, 91, a longtime Homeland resident who had been born in Germany, and had vivid memories of life in prewar Berlin, died the following Saturday. They were both intensely cultivated and friendly, and shared an abiding interest in the arts, books and people, especially young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 26, 2000
I have been to Ireland time and again for much of my life, listening, writing, savoring the joys of a country I love -- and trying to understand things that defy understanding. Thoughts of Ireland sent me back almost 20 years the other day, to a passage in a long series of articles I wrote in 1981: "At every corner on the island of Ireland, history is both witness and judge, the accuser and the accused. It intrudes, first as an engaging, often lyric, counterpoint to all other subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 3, 1999
At 8 o'clock this evening, Turner Network Television, which coyly designates itself "The Best Movie Studio on Television," will broadcast a two-hour adaptation of George Orwell's "Animal Farm." If you are getting married or being launched into space at that moment, rest easy: Seven "encores" are scheduled over the next two weeks.TNT's publicity declares this "the most ambitious film ever made for television." Not only that, TNT also proclaims that the film "is destined to become the most important television event of the year."
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