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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Colonial Players' production of Steven Dietz's "Inventing van Gogh" provides an intriguing set of mysteries about the existence of a mythical last self-portrait by the artist, the man himself and the modern art scene. First-time CP director Michelle Harmon rates high marks for meeting the challenges that arose during production. She had signed on to direct "Radio Golf" by August Wilson, which ended up being pulled from the schedule "because of rights issues. " "Inventing van Gogh" was chosen as a replacement.
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EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Text Messages, every Saturday and Sunday in November, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 27, 2000
"Fairfield Porter: A Life In Art" by Justin Spring (Yale University Press, 383 pages, $35) Treasured as a realist by many people who find abstraction distressing, Porter may be the most misunderstood of major American modern painters. That his work is splendid is hard to doubt -- but his aesthetic impact and influence went way beyond his painting. His writing on contemporary art and artists qualifies as enduringly important. Justin Spring has gone to commendable lengths to present the spirit and mind of a deeply troubled, brilliant man. The result is an extraordinarily valuable exploration of modernity in America.
EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
Submit notices via email: messenger@patuxent.com ; fax: 410-332-6336; or mail: Baltimore Messenger, 501 N. Calvert St., Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21278. Include sponsor or host, date, time, address of event, contact name and phone number. Deadline is noon the Thursday before publication. Arts and Museums The Walters Art Museum - 600 N. Charles St. 410-547-9000, http://www.thewalters.org. • Drop-in Art Activities: Kid Geniuses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 30, 1999
There was triple-decker talent at Maryland Art Place's "Out of Order" party. All three floors of the West Saratoga Street art center were jam-packed with art and the artsy. More than 300 art lovers made the scene, groovin' to the tunes of Baltimore bands Love Riot and the Swingin' Swamis; marveling at the marionettes of Black Cherry Puppet Theater; and bidding on some 200 creations by local artists.Among the partygoers were MAP executive director Jack Rasmussen; assistant director Julie Cavnor; party co-chairs Abby Lattes and Chris Hartlove; committee members Dean Alexander and Max Glanville; MAP board president Suzi Cordish; participating artists Paul Moscatt, Lois Borgenicht and Marian Savige; Tamara Nelson, MIX 106 radio news director; Philip Klein, senior partner at Klein Enterprises; and Mary Jo Gordon, owner of Galerie Francoise.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | March 5, 1995
Even the casual collector of folk art may be inspired to learn more on the subject. Richard Edson hands out a two-page bibliography to those who visit his Folk Art Gallery in Bolton Hill and recommends the library at Maryland Institute, College of Art as a prime research spot.Here are some other sources:* The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington is presenting a major exhibition of folk art in "Passionate Visions of the American South," which opened yesterday. The Corcoran is located at New York Avenue and 17th Street Northwest, Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 19, 2003
Art -- A Sex Book, by John Waters and Bruce Hainley. Thames & Hudson. 208 pages. $29.95. Beginning with its cover, which is not presentable in a family newspaper, this remarkable book is not for the prudish or squeamish. Hainley is a curator, writer and scholar. John Waters is Baltimore's indefatigable archangel of the outrageous. This is a serious and seriously unorthodox work of art scholarship and criticism. The text is presented throughout as a conversation between the two authors, talking of the works --175 reproductions of art works, 147 of them in color -- and of aesthetic concepts, both concrete and abstract.
NEWS
February 8, 1993
Name: Chris MassieSchool: Thunder Hill Elementary SchoolHome: ColumbiaAge: 10His accomplishments: The fifth-grader has won a scholarship to study art at the Maryland Institute of Art. His scholarship, worth $180 for 10 weeks of lessons, will enable him to learn more about 19th century and 20th century art and artists.Chris turned in a portfolio containing 10 pieces of his work, including still-life drawings, batiks and animation, to be considered for the scholarship."He's a very talented kid," said his art teacher, Janet Baird.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | September 24, 2000
Why stop at painting the town red? The galleries at Maryland Art Place covered the color spectrum at "R&R -- A Rare and Raw Evening," its annual benefit exhibition and auction. As they sipped wine and nibbled on hors d'oeuvres, partygoers perused creations by Maryland artists. Dinner came with a side order of a live -- and lively -- auction, as guests eagerly bid on works of art between bites. Among the 250 art lovers attending were: Mike Lewin, honorary event chair; Martha Macks, Allison Parker and Max Weiss, event committee members; Karen Bokram, MAP board chair; Suzi Cordish, Diane Hutchins and Flo Lipitz, board members; Mary Ann Mears, board emeritus; Jack Rasmussen, MAP executive director; Greg Barnhill, managing director of Deutsche Banc Alex.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
LEROY COMEGYS REMEMBERS GROWING UP IN Baltimore during the 1940s and '50s in a house filled with music and art: his mom's piano playing, his dad listening to jazz recordings, and the paintings and drawings his parents hung on the walls of their home -- among them sketches of black people by American artist Reginald Marsh for his famous painting of New York's Coney Island Beach. Those early experiences, which sparked a lifelong love of art, help explain why Comegys, 62, is so enthusiastic today about sharing his passion with others.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Colonial Players' production of Steven Dietz's "Inventing van Gogh" provides an intriguing set of mysteries about the existence of a mythical last self-portrait by the artist, the man himself and the modern art scene. First-time CP director Michelle Harmon rates high marks for meeting the challenges that arose during production. She had signed on to direct "Radio Golf" by August Wilson, which ended up being pulled from the schedule "because of rights issues. " "Inventing van Gogh" was chosen as a replacement.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH | August 11, 2009
A month after the annual Artscape drew record crowds to the streets around Penn Station and MICA, the Inner Harbor Art Festival will make its debut, spread out in two areas: the Power Plant near the National Aquarium and Power Plant Live a couple of blocks north. The free outdoor event will be held Aug. 22 and 23. Announcing the new venture at a news conference Monday morning in front of the Power Plant, Mayor Sheila Dixon described as "phenomenal" the group of 150 artists, regional and national, who will be offering more than $15 million worth of creative work for sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh and Ishita Singh,Sun reporter | June 26, 2008
In Megan Hildebrandt's amusing painting of Mary Pickersgill, the famed flag-maker stares wryly as she sews the Stars and Stripes. C. Lee's affectionate photograph of his late mother hangs beside it. It is an odd juxtaposition: the humorous Pickersgill next to the tender, loving parent. Such juxtapositions are common at the Creative Alliance's The Big Show. The show, which opens tomorrow, provides a forum solely for members' artwork, an "in-house" celebration of art. "I think that we want, as an organization, to just present the kind of collected creativity of our members and the artists of Baltimore in the best possible manner, so we hang the art and show it in its best light," said Creative Alliance artistic director Jed Dodds.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
LEROY COMEGYS REMEMBERS GROWING UP IN Baltimore during the 1940s and '50s in a house filled with music and art: his mom's piano playing, his dad listening to jazz recordings, and the paintings and drawings his parents hung on the walls of their home -- among them sketches of black people by American artist Reginald Marsh for his famous painting of New York's Coney Island Beach. Those early experiences, which sparked a lifelong love of art, help explain why Comegys, 62, is so enthusiastic today about sharing his passion with others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SARAH MARSTON AND JORGE VALENCIA | June 15, 2006
Dads in the great outdoors The Oregon Ridge Nature Center hosts the "Native American Games With Dad" program Saturday and Sunday and the annual Council Picnic on Monday. Take Dad to learn Native-American games on the weekend, then come back on Monday night for an evening of picnicking, fishing, canoeing and swimming, followed by a campfire by the lake with s'mores and guitar-playing. The center will provide charcoal and grills, but guests must bring their own food to barbecue. The "Native American Games With Dad" is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Oregon Ridge Nature Center, 13555 Beaver Dam Road in Cockeysville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 3, 2005
Visual art and those who create it can be tricky to portray on stage. Paintings and sculptures are generally static, and the creative process is partly internal and often slow. It's literally a matter of watching paint dry. That hasn't discouraged playwrights or theaters from portraying art and artists and using them as windows into society's soul. In Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's 1984 musical, Sunday in the Park With George, for example, the life of Georges Seurat offers insights into the loneliness and intensity of genius.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 2, 1994
Local artist Amalie Rothschild criticized the Baltimore Museum of Art for its "blatant rejection and exclusion" of local artists at an arts forum Wednesday night."
FEATURES
January 5, 1999
Be a 4Kids DetectiveWhen you know the answers to these questions, go to http://www.4Kids.org/detectives/When was the artist Alfred Stieglitz born?How many kilometers from the Sun is the Earth? (Go tohttp://hyperion.advanced.org/15215/ for the answer.)What color do you get when you mix red, green and blue light?That's Artrageous!Whether it's in the form of paintings, sculptures or photography, art can be an adventure like no other. If you are just learning how to use a brush, you'll love the Art Room at http://www.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 3, 2005
Since the spectacular Romare Bearden retrospective at the National Gallery of Art in Washington a little more than a year ago, interest in African-American art and artists has increased exponentially, it seems. Artworks that only a few years ago were virtually unknown among curators, critics and collectors are now eagerly sought out and displayed. Both the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Museum have begun to make significant acquisitions of contemporary and 19th-century works by African-American artists a priority.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 2004
As a youngster, Kerry James Marshall spent hours in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art looking at the Old Master paintings, wondering what it would be like to make pictures worthy of hanging beside them. But as an African-American child from a modest household in South Central, he had few role models. There were no black artists on the museum's walls or in the art history books he pored over in the city's public libraries. One day he came across James A. Porter's landmark 1943 book, The Negro Artist, the first comprehensive study of African-American art. It was a revelation: Here was a rich tradition of artmaking he hadn't known existed -- of black artists creating works for and about black people, their hopes, joys and sorrows.
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