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Arrogance

NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | August 14, 2008
People accuse us old liberals of smarmy self-righteousness, and God knows they are right. Four of us had lunch the other day and we agreed before we sat down: no politics. We know what we're going to say, so why say it? Self-righteousness is a good old American vice, and we have it, and though preferable to cruelty and cynicism and deliberate dumbheadedness, nonetheless remind yourself: You are not so different from the others. So when we got onto politics halfway through my tuna sandwich, I said a deliberate unself-righteous thing: "I don't think any of us believes what we say we believe.
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NEWS
By Jed Kirschbaum and Jed Kirschbaum,Sun Photographer | March 30, 2008
There are at least as many definitions of art as there are bristles on a brush. Maryland Institute College of Art student Lee B. Freeman's gold fence project in Mount Vernon Square has prompted not only different viewpoints but a flood of Sun articles involving at least three reporters and five photographers. First, the newspaper ran a piece about the art project itself. The next day brought angry phone calls and dissent. People shut off from the park, especially those with dogs, were none too pleased with the barricade.
NEWS
March 26, 2008
Can exclusion be a form of art? The artist who came up with the idea of closing off Mount Vernon Place to make citizens appreciate the park more fully is guilty of extreme arrogance ("Artist's trial by ire," March 23). Following his line of thinking, perhaps we should starve ourselves so that we will enjoy eating more? Or beat our heads against the wall so that we'll understand how much better it feels when we stop? The fence around that beautiful park is ugly. Why would any city official agree to the closure of a park for the purpose of an artistic statement that suggests we don't appreciate the park until we're fenced out of it?
SPORTS
November 23, 2007
Presenting the Black Friday version of sports media notes while wondering whether America ever would have heard of turkducken if not for John Madden: As the NFL and the nation's cable giants go at each other over access to the NFL Network, it's hard to know whom to cheer for. The league that seems to always get its way and exudes a certain arrogance while doing so? Or the corporations that have had a monopoly on running television into your home and raising your rates after you're hooked?
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 15, 2007
When NFL commissioner Roger Goodell announced that Bill Belichick would be fined $500,000 for his part in the New England Patriots spy scandal, millions of football fans each thought the same thing at the same time: Geez, I hope they don't take it out of his clothing allowance. That's got to be the equivalent of, what, 40,000 baggy sweat shirts? The man would be shivering on the sideline for the next 2,000 seasons. No matter how you cut it, that's a pretty big bite, especially when you factor in the $250,000 fine Goodell dropped on the team and - most important of all - the 2008 first-round draft choice the Patriots will lose if they make the playoffs this season.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The imperial presidency that George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney have worked so hard to protect and strengthen seems to be crumbling around them. The broad mantle of executive authority Mr. Bush assumed in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks is being shredded piece by piece, largely as a result of public opposition to the Iraq war - an overreach that vastly undermined confidence in unchecked presidential power. Two striking examples occurred almost simultaneously last week: The Bush administration was forced to retreat after the FBI was revealed to be abusing - and botching - its authority to secretly demand personal records of Americans, and a band of fired U.S. attorneys blew the whistle on political influence in the prosecutorial process.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 18, 2006
Ron Dellums, recently elected mayor of Oakland, Calif., is feeling pretty darned good about the recent congressional elections. And there's no reason he shouldn't. The mayor-elect is the former Rep. Ronald V. Dellums of a liberal/leftist swatch of a congressional district that comprises parts of Oakland and Berkeley. Dellums was first elected to Congress in 1970 and stayed there 27 years. Earlier this week, Dellums spoke to members of the Trotter Group at their annual gathering, which was held this year on the campus of Stanford University.
BUSINESS
By Susan Chandler and Susan Chandler,Chicgo Tribune | November 14, 2006
Departing Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld may be leaving behind a legacy of discord and failure at the Pentagon and in Iraq. But that doesn't mean he won't be highly sought after as a board member or corporate executive, say headhunters who have tracked his career. "He has a great business background and a great government background. As long as Nancy Pelosi isn't the lead director, I think he would be a real prize for any board," said Greg Crecos, who heads Gregory Michaels & Associates, a Chicago search firm.
NEWS
By Timothy R. Ferguson | November 1, 2006
I've been a Republican for 30 years. I was reared a Democrat but felt the party abandoned me in the 1970s. I am a Ronald Reagan conservative and would be a "Dixiecrat" if I were a Democrat today. Problem is, now the GOP has abandoned me. I had a preacher friend once say, "The two parties are divided between `sinners' and `Pharisees.' Which group did Jesus get along with?" I served as a Republican state senator in Maryland, but I am no fan of George Bush, Dick Cheney or Karl Rove. They talk like Reagan Republicans, but they don't govern like Reagan.
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