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NEWS
January 13, 1995
An article in yesterday's editions stated incorrectly that Del. James E. Malone Jr., D-Baltimore County, arrived for the first day of the legislative session in a limousine. In fact, the delegate's parents and several other family members rode in the limousine. He arrived by car.The Sun regrets the error.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
It has begun to feel like fall, with schools in session and a chill in the air, but the season actually arrives at the moment of autumnal equinox at 10:29 p.m. Monday. At that instant, Earth will be rotating upright on its axis, giving the northern and southern hemispheres equal sunlight and making the length of day and night roughly equal. In Baltimore, the sun will stay up for 12 hours or more until Friday. It's the tilt of the Earth's axis that gives us seasons -- at the winter solstice, the axis is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun, and at the summer solstice, it's tilted 23.5 degrees away from the sun. Meteorological fall started Sept.
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NEWS
October 7, 1993
* Hampstead: Firefighters from Hampstead responded to a report of a fire on Crystal Court at 7:49 a.m. Tuesday. The fire had been extinguished by the time they arrived.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A satellite that has been hurtling toward Mars for the past 10 months slammed on the brakes Sunday night, gliding into the red planet's gravity field to spend a year studying its atmosphere - and hopefully collect evidence that Mars might once have supported life. On a mission managed from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, the MAVEN spacecraft neared completion Sunday night of a 442 million-mile journey by firing six thrusters in reverse and being pulled into Mars' gravity field.
NEWS
December 27, 1993
FIRE* Winfield: Winfield helped state police search for a missing 5-year-old boy at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.The search was called off after about an hour, when it was learned that the child had not arrived on the school bus because someone else had picked him up at school.
SPORTS
By Chris Warner and Chris Warner,SPECIAL TO BALTIMORESUN.COM | July 1, 2005
"A journey," the old saying goes, "should start with a first step," not a thunderstorm over New Jersey. All the flights from Washington, D.C. to Newark (where I would connect with my Pakistan bound flight) were cancelled. I waited on six different lines for more than 5 hours. At the end of line number 7, I was asked to pay $739 to get a seat on the next available flight (departing from a different airport and two days later). To add to the misery, the employees of United Airlines somehow lost my baggage, despite the flight never departing.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | February 23, 1992
What started out as a simulation turned into the real thing at the Emergency Operations Center Thursday.EOC personnel were testing and demonstrating a new medical information system for county officialsand other visitors when the program was used on a real call.Senior dispatcher Debbie Burk was on the radio at 10:30 a.m. whena man called saying his wife was unconscious. Quickly turning to a set of information cards and asking a few questions, Burk determined that the woman was in cardiac arrest and requested an engine to assistSykesville's ambulance, already in route.
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | July 10, 1994
The Crab Shanty, a restaurant along U.S. 40 in Ellicott City, serves some of the best seafood in Howard County.It's a shame I won't be able to go there again and enjoy a meal.My last visit was for lunch last Sunday. What began as a classic disagreement about the quality of service quickly disintegrated into the kind of subtle, racist incident that I find abominable, especially in the community I call home.I arrived at the restaurant 20 minutes before its 2 p.m. opening and approached the hostess, who suggested I sit in the waiting area.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 7, 1995
The cheering seemed to arrive from some faraway place, from an abandoned baseball field on 33rd Street, or from a moment in the spring of 1982, or from 13 summers ago when Cal Ripken had all of his potential in front of him but no one ever imagined a moment such as last night.Under a darkening South Baltimore sky, the big crowd's roar built and built until it echoed onto Eutaw Place, out where the Babe Ruth statue stands, until the Babe himself must have wondered, "What's all that noise? I never heard the likes of it since me and Lou were playing up in the Bronx."
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 21, 2001
WE BID farewell to Cal Ripken as the embodiment of the American Dream and the last carrier of a vanishing culture. We watched him round the bases and shake his daddy's hand. We saw him flip the double-play grounder to his brother Bill. We saw him wave to his mom the night he caught the ghost of Lou Gehrig, and kiss his wife and little kids as they sat behind home plate. Who hasn't drifted to sleep dreaming such dreams? He is the hometown boy who extended the backyard whiffle ball field to the front porch stadium, where each night he heard his own neighbors cheer him on. Who hasn't had a schoolyard catch without picturing such heaven on earth?
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Sean Welsh and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
President Barack Obama landed in South Baltimore in a large helicopter shortly before 4 p.m. Friday in advance of a private tour of Fort McHenry. Obama disembarked one of three aircraft that landed in a field to the side of Sun Park, just northwest of the Hanover Street Bridge. Secret Service agents spent days preparing and securing the site. The President walked briskly from the open doors of his helicopter to a waiting motorcade. Just moments before, Blue Angels jets streaked across the same skies amid the Star-Spangled Spectacular events.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
A lot can happen in the first three years of a restaurant's life. Things can go haywire. Investors panic, managers quit and staff moves on. But sometimes, not often enough, wisdom prevails. The restaurant considers what works, what doesn't. It reacts, but doesn't overreact, to diners' responses, and it changes things, thoughtfully, gradually, confidently. If you believe in the capacity for change, head down to Wit & Wisdom, the principal restaurant at the Four Seasons Baltimore Hotel.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to beautify the approaches to Baltimore for visitors arriving by rail may seem like a triumph of style over substance in efforts to revitalize the city's image. But first impressions really do count, and the mayor is right that it doesn't have to be the depressing landscape of boarded-up houses and trash-strewn yards that greets rail passengers today. In the grand scheme of things, sprucing up the route along which travelers pass as they enter the city won't by itself transform Baltimore's fortunes.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
It's seafood time, dear readers! Enjoy the 33rd Havre de Grace Seafood Festival in Tydings Park, today through Sunday, (Aug. 8-10) Friday 3 to 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sample seafood delicacies from near and far, while enjoying live entertainment, artisans and crafters. Welcome to 3 Dog Night, live in concert, tonight, Aug. 8. Phone 410-939-1525 for more information or visit http://www.hdgseafoodfestival.org . The American Legion Post 47 will sponsor second and third Saturdays (of the month)
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
As bills go out with the first fees for customers who don't want smart meters, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. is pressing to apply the charges to a much larger group - people the utility says have ignored repeated requests to switch out old meters located indoors or behind locked gates. About 350,000 customers with inaccessible meters - more than a quarter of BGE's territory - haven't scheduled appointments with contractors despite multiple attempts, the company said. That's preventing installation, but they aren't on the hook for the extra charge now levied on people who ask to opt out of a smart meter.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 17, 1995
Christopher Morgan squats on the ground behind the Middlesex Shopping Center in Essex. His eyes are red-rimmed, owing to several sleepless nights. People come and go. They leave flowers and stuffed animals. Morgan stays. He says the spirit of the children holds him here.The children were killed in a station wagon explosion last week. The cops say Mark Alen Clark, furious that his wife, Betty, left him and wouldn't come back, blew up the station wagon (so badly damaged that police initially reported it was a minivan)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 4, 1995
Moments before the verdict was read, NBC anchorman Tom Brokaw told viewers in a hushed voice, "There is nothing we can say that would add to the suspense or drama of this moment."Then, of course, after only a momentary pause, Brokaw went right on talking, adding yet a few more drops of prattle to an 18-hour tidal wave of television talk that finally washed ashore yesterday with the not-guilty verdict for O.J. Simpson.The network news cameras were wall-to-wall in Los Angeles, and the big-name anchors were on the air starting at 7 a.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Netdao Yutakon of Nashville, Tenn., was still shaking her head, getting used to the lightness two days after her waist-length hair was chopped off to meet Naval Academy regulations in time for her freshman year. "It was like losing a best friend," said Yutakon, an 18-year-old graduate of Hume-Fogg Academic High School in Tennessee, as she fiddled with the locks that now come just below her ears. At least Yutakon was spared the razor. One by one, members of the freshmen class who didn't have their hair cut before Tuesday saw their locks vanish with the quick work of a barber - a ritual that was among their first tastes of academy life in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Though schools are out and pools are open, summer doesn't officially begin until early Saturday morning. The summer solstice, the point at which the Earth's axis tilts the northern hemisphere its furthest toward the sun, occurs at 6:51 a.m. As the National Climatic Data Center explains , it is when the solar energy reaching Earth is the strongest in the northern hemisphere. At the solstice, the sun takes its most northern path through the sky, which means on this side of the globe, we have our longest days and shortest nights of the year. Friday is the last day of the year in which we can look forward to more sunshine tomorrow.
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