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By John Woolard and John Woolard,Knight-Ridder | January 3, 1991
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- Preliminary results from a private autopsy show that football coach George Allen died from a heart spasm brought on by arrhythmia, and that his death was not connected to an ice-water dousing he received Nov. 17 after his Long Beach State team defeated Nevada-Las Vegas to clinch a winning season.Allen, winner of three NFL Coach of the Year awards who revitalized the floundering Long Beach State football program during the 1990 season, died unexpectedly at his home Monday at the age of 72."
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By Sports Digest | November 13, 2010
Boxing Lewis, trainer of city fighters for six decades, dies at 92 Mack Lewis , a boxing trainer who worked with thousands of fighters in Baltimore over six decades, died Friday night at Good Samaritan Hospital, his nephew, Elmer Johnson , said. Lewis had just turned 92. Lewis, who grew up near Patterson Park and played football at Morgan State, began running Mickey O'Donnell 's Broadway Gym in the 1940s. He trained fighters of all ages and abilities at that facility until his supporters helped him move to a state-of-the-art gym on Bond Street.
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SPORTS
February 28, 1992
Chamberlain OK, has abnormal heart rhythmWilt Chamberlain was in excellent condition at an Inglewood, Calif., hospital yesterday, a day after experiencing a slightly abnormal heart rhythm at a Los Angeles Lakers game, doctors said. "Considering he has an arrhythmia, he's in excellent condition," said Chamberlain's personal physician, Dr. Ellen Goudlock. "He's in absolutely great spirits. He's laughing, and watching TV."Goudlock said at a news conference that Chamberlain's arrhythmia was merely an abnormal heart rhythm.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 17, 2006
If your heart is failing, your chances of getting a new one might hang on whether your local transplant center concludes that you're too old, too fat or too sick to qualify for a precious donor heart. If you're turned down, you can shop around and might get a more sympathetic hearing at a hospital in another city, or even across town. Critics say the criteria that hospitals in Baltimore, across the country and around the world use to select patients for life-saving transplants are inconsistent and sometimes arbitrary - with too little foundation in current science.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
Millions of Americans experience atrial fibrillation every year, but doctors have never been able to determine precisely why an apparently healthy heart like President Bush's would suddenly stumble into arrhythmia after beating normally for 66 years."
NEWS
By Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton and Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
The pacemaker device Vice President Dick Cheney expects to have implanted today should stop any rapid heart rhythms that, if sustained long enough, could kill him. In a recent monitoring of his heart, physicians discovered some brief periods of rapid beating, a sign that Cheney could develop the life-threatening arrhythmias that lead to sudden cardiac death in 350,000 Americans every year. Cheney, 60, said he hasn't experienced the symptoms that a sustained irregular heart rhythm would generally produce - lightheadedness or fainting - and he described the device as a type of insurance.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 30, 1997
A GREAT MANY adults go through their days agitated and irritable and depressed and resentful, and when they have the energy to wonder why they feel this way, they decide that it is because of their own failings.Some women suspect it is their hormones and some men suspect it is their sea-level spot on the corporate mountain. Everybody thinks it is because he or she is getting older, and there is now more of life behind than in front.I am here to suggest that it is none of those things.Our middle-aged malaise is not our fault.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 17, 2006
If your heart is failing, your chances of getting a new one might hang on whether your local transplant center concludes that you're too old, too fat or too sick to qualify for a precious donor heart. If you're turned down, you can shop around and might get a more sympathetic hearing at a hospital in another city, or even across town. Critics say the criteria that hospitals in Baltimore, across the country and around the world use to select patients for life-saving transplants are inconsistent and sometimes arbitrary - with too little foundation in current science.
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Roch Eric Kubatko contributed to this article | January 24, 1996
An autopsy report released yesterday shows that UMBC basketball player Matt Skalsky died from the irregular beating of an enlarged heart -- a finding that recalls the sudden deaths of other basketball players in recent years.Skalsky, 19, died of sudden cardiac arrhythmia associated with heart tissue scarring and the type of heart enlargement seen in well-conditioned athletes who suddenly die, the autopsy report states. Medical examiners ruled Skalsky died of natural causes after collapsing at a New Year's Eve party.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
The 18-year-old Naval Academy student found dead in her dormitory bed in August had an undiagnosed heart abnormality that apparently caused a fatal disruption of her heartbeat, according to autopsy results released yesterday.Doctors at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington ruled out foul play and suicide in the sudden death Aug. 18 of Joanna F. Simer, a freshman from Minnetonka, Minn., said Chris Kelly, a spokesman for AFIP."We considered everything," Kelly said. "Our tests were as thorough and complete as they could be."
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
CHICAGO - Reggie White probably died of a mysterious inflammatory disease of unknown origin that can strike any organ in the body, exist without detection and disappear without treatment in many cases, according to a preliminary autopsy report. Sarcoidosis in White's lungs and heart was the likely trigger that "resulted in a fatal cardiac arrhythmia," Dr. Mike Sullivan, medical examiner of Mecklenburg County, N.C., said yesterday. "Sleep apnea may have been a contributing factor." Sullivan's is the jurisdiction where White died at 7:51 a.m. Sunday after being taken from his home in Cornelius, N.C., to Presbyterian Hospital in Huntersville, N.C. He was 43. Though sarcoidosis is lethal in only 5 percent of cases and is reported in only one of every 2,500 U.S. residents, its insidious nature apparently has been revealed again in White's case.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2004
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair said he would enter the hospital today for treatment of an irregular heartbeat. Blair, 51, said the procedure was routine and would not affect his plans to seek a full third term in office next year, the first for a Labor prime minister. However, speaking to the British Broadcasting Corp., he ruled out serving beyond a third term. Doctors recommended the procedure, a catheter ablation, to correct a tachycardia, or accelerated heartbeat, that has bothered him repeatedly in recent months, Blair said.
NEWS
By Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton and Diana Sugg and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
The pacemaker device Vice President Dick Cheney expects to have implanted today should stop any rapid heart rhythms that, if sustained long enough, could kill him. In a recent monitoring of his heart, physicians discovered some brief periods of rapid beating, a sign that Cheney could develop the life-threatening arrhythmias that lead to sudden cardiac death in 350,000 Americans every year. Cheney, 60, said he hasn't experienced the symptoms that a sustained irregular heart rhythm would generally produce - lightheadedness or fainting - and he described the device as a type of insurance.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 30, 1997
A GREAT MANY adults go through their days agitated and irritable and depressed and resentful, and when they have the energy to wonder why they feel this way, they decide that it is because of their own failings.Some women suspect it is their hormones and some men suspect it is their sea-level spot on the corporate mountain. Everybody thinks it is because he or she is getting older, and there is now more of life behind than in front.I am here to suggest that it is none of those things.Our middle-aged malaise is not our fault.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1996
The 18-year-old Naval Academy student found dead in her dormitory bed in August had an undiagnosed heart abnormality that apparently caused a fatal disruption of her heartbeat, according to autopsy results released yesterday.Doctors at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington ruled out foul play and suicide in the sudden death Aug. 18 of Joanna F. Simer, a freshman from Minnetonka, Minn., said Chris Kelly, a spokesman for AFIP."We considered everything," Kelly said. "Our tests were as thorough and complete as they could be."
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Roch Eric Kubatko contributed to this article | January 24, 1996
An autopsy report released yesterday shows that UMBC basketball player Matt Skalsky died from the irregular beating of an enlarged heart -- a finding that recalls the sudden deaths of other basketball players in recent years.Skalsky, 19, died of sudden cardiac arrhythmia associated with heart tissue scarring and the type of heart enlargement seen in well-conditioned athletes who suddenly die, the autopsy report states. Medical examiners ruled Skalsky died of natural causes after collapsing at a New Year's Eve party.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
CHICAGO - Reggie White probably died of a mysterious inflammatory disease of unknown origin that can strike any organ in the body, exist without detection and disappear without treatment in many cases, according to a preliminary autopsy report. Sarcoidosis in White's lungs and heart was the likely trigger that "resulted in a fatal cardiac arrhythmia," Dr. Mike Sullivan, medical examiner of Mecklenburg County, N.C., said yesterday. "Sleep apnea may have been a contributing factor." Sullivan's is the jurisdiction where White died at 7:51 a.m. Sunday after being taken from his home in Cornelius, N.C., to Presbyterian Hospital in Huntersville, N.C. He was 43. Though sarcoidosis is lethal in only 5 percent of cases and is reported in only one of every 2,500 U.S. residents, its insidious nature apparently has been revealed again in White's case.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2004
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair said he would enter the hospital today for treatment of an irregular heartbeat. Blair, 51, said the procedure was routine and would not affect his plans to seek a full third term in office next year, the first for a Labor prime minister. However, speaking to the British Broadcasting Corp., he ruled out serving beyond a third term. Doctors recommended the procedure, a catheter ablation, to correct a tachycardia, or accelerated heartbeat, that has bothered him repeatedly in recent months, Blair said.
SPORTS
February 28, 1992
Chamberlain OK, has abnormal heart rhythmWilt Chamberlain was in excellent condition at an Inglewood, Calif., hospital yesterday, a day after experiencing a slightly abnormal heart rhythm at a Los Angeles Lakers game, doctors said. "Considering he has an arrhythmia, he's in excellent condition," said Chamberlain's personal physician, Dr. Ellen Goudlock. "He's in absolutely great spirits. He's laughing, and watching TV."Goudlock said at a news conference that Chamberlain's arrhythmia was merely an abnormal heart rhythm.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | May 7, 1991
Millions of Americans experience atrial fibrillation every year, but doctors have never been able to determine precisely why an apparently healthy heart like President Bush's would suddenly stumble into arrhythmia after beating normally for 66 years."
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