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Arrears

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BUSINESS
March 19, 1993
MNC Financial Inc. said yesterday that it will reinstate the dividends on its preferred stock and will pay the $15.5 million of preferred stock dividends that have been in arrears. MNC stopped paying all its dividends in the fourth quarter of 1990, citing growing losses primarily from the banking company's commercial real estate portfolio.MNC, which is awaiting approval from regulators and shareholders on its acquisition by NationsBank Corp., said it will pay holders of Series CC adjustable rate cumulative preferred stock 80 cents a share, while holders of the Series DD stock will receive 77.5 cents a share.
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NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
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NEWS
September 23, 1997
THE 'GRAND BARGAIN' that the administration hopes to cement between the United Nations and Congress is desperately needed, but that does not guarantee success. It is in deep trouble. The 185 members of the U.N. General Assembly may not enact the reforms Secretary-General Kofi Annan recommended, which are insufficient to assuage Sen. Jesse Helms. The Senate, under the North Carolina Republican's foreign policy leadership, is considering paying only some of the arrears the United States owes.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Thousands of Maryland residents are in danger of having their utility service terminated because of overdue bills, company representatives said. After thousands of complaints of sky-high bills this winter, the Maryland Public Service Commission ordered five utility companies - BGE, Pepco, Delmarva, Allegheny Power and Washington Gas Light - to work out payment plans with customers before sending turnoff notices. About 50,000 Baltimore Gas and Electric customers successfully began interest-free payment plans, but about 74,000 remained at risk of termination as of Friday, said a company spokesman, Robert Gould.
NEWS
December 25, 1992
The state's Child Support Enforcement Administratio released yesterday its "Ten Most Wanted" list of people who are delinquent in child-support payments."
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
Thousands of Maryland residents are in danger of having their utility service terminated because of overdue bills, company representatives said. After thousands of complaints of sky-high bills this winter, the Maryland Public Service Commission ordered five utility companies - BGE, Pepco, Delmarva, Allegheny Power and Washington Gas Light - to work out payment plans with customers before sending turnoff notices. About 50,000 Baltimore Gas and Electric customers successfully began interest-free payment plans, but about 74,000 remained at risk of termination as of Friday, said a company spokesman, Robert Gould.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
David L. Warnock, chairman of the Center for Urban Families, bemoans the fact that dads released from jail accrue thousands of dollars' worth of child-support debt and have no way ever to get square, having earned no income while incarcerated and having a bleak chance of being gainfully employed in the future ("Hurting dads, hurting kids," Oct. 21). Meanwhile, their children don't have the child support that has been awarded and live in poverty. He urges expansion and strengthening new programs that help these men reenter the workforce, and the lives of the children, in a way that allows them to work off their arrears and, eventually, to "have their arrears reduced to zero.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993
AT&T sues MCI over patentsIn a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court, American Telephone and Telegraph charged MCI Communications Corp. with the infringement of 10 AT&T patents for technologies that have enhanced long-distance services.Rotorex recalling workersA company that makes air conditioner compressors has resumed production in Walkersville by recalling 250 hourly employees. Officials of Rotorex Co. said in a statement that production would be increased and the Frederick County company would recall 170 more workers by February.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | July 2, 1996
PHILADELPHIA -- Would someone please explain why the Clinton administration has launched a messy public campaign to oust United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali?The whole business is rather ugly. Last month, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said publicly that Washington will veto a second five years for Mr. Boutros-Ghali, whose tenure expires at the end of this year. Mr. Boutros-Ghali says he will run anyway.Most member states, including U.S. allies, are furious that deadbeat America -- $1.2 billion in arrears in its U.N. dues -- has acted so high-handedly.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 26, 1998
MOSCOW -- No sooner had a Russian Cabinet finally been put together yesterday -- 33 days after the last one was dismissed at the start of the economic collapse -- than one of its most prominent members said he was quitting in disgust.Alexander Shokhin, deputy prime minister for economic affairs, had just finished talks with a delegation from the International Monetary Fund when he announced that he was walking out. He had received news that he had lost a drawn-out, behind-the-scenes struggle over who would be named finance minister.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 6, 2008
Now that Maryland has turned up its tax rates a couple more watts, big and bright as neon, is it too much to ask the state to stop taking even more of our money under cover of darkness? We pay Maryland in multiple ways beyond the sticker price. One of the biggest offenders will be on display today before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee - the extortionate interest the state collects on late taxes. You might think a legislature with a history of outrage over private-sector usury would be embarrassed by its own resemblance to Tony Soprano.
NEWS
By Jenifer Mackby and Ola Dahlman | July 25, 2007
While the United States is spending $3 billion each week on the war in Iraq - a war, let us remember, that was predicated in part on nuclear fears - it refuses to pay a good part of its dues to the organization that provides for monitoring the countries it wants to prevent from developing nuclear weapons, including North Korea and Iran. The organization that is to implement the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty has installed 75 percent of its verification structure, an alarm system that monitors the entire globe for nuclear explosions.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | February 6, 2007
The Senator Theatre, one of the last of the nation's once numerous art deco movie palaces and the only one still showing films in Baltimore, is to be sold at a foreclosure auction Feb. 21. Tom Kiefaber, the Senator's owner, acknowledged yesterday that he is $90,000 in arrears on a $1.2 million mortgage he took out on the 900-seat theater five years ago.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2003
Dear Mr. Azrael: Please advise if property ground rent should be billed and paid in advance or after the given time period. Thank you very much. Bruce and Elaine Chilcote Baltimore Dear Mr. and Mrs. Chilcote: Property ground rent is paid "in arrears." Here's an example: Suppose a property is subject to a $120 annual ground rent, payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July of each year. On Jan. 1, $60 in ground rent is due for the period July 1, 2002, through Dec. 31, 2002.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
Citing concerns that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has shut off service to more than 22,700 residential customers since April, the state People's Counsel asked state regulators yesterday to launch a formal investigation into the utility's termination practices. Most troubling, according to the petition filed with the Maryland Public Service Commission, is that more than 2,000 of those terminations involved low-income customers who qualified for state energy assistance. In comparison, Potomac Electric Power Co. shut off only 187 low-income customers during that same period, April 1 to June 30. And while the utility stepped up the number of shut-offs and shut-off notices, the People's Counsel's petition said, BGE either rejected outright or was unreasonable about helping customers establish alternate payment schedules to avoid termination.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2000
Thomas Knox Jr. had $30,000 in past-due child support, a warrant out for his arrest, and a lawyer quietly telling him to skip town. Instead, he walked into the place he might have feared most - the Baltimore County child-support enforcement office - and set up a plan to pay. "I've got another lawyer - Jesus," Knox, 38, said this week after he had arranged for money to be taken from his city paycheck for his 15-year-old daughter. "I know I owe the money. It makes me feel better, because I" haven't got to hide any more.
NEWS
By Jenifer Mackby and Ola Dahlman | July 25, 2007
While the United States is spending $3 billion each week on the war in Iraq - a war, let us remember, that was predicated in part on nuclear fears - it refuses to pay a good part of its dues to the organization that provides for monitoring the countries it wants to prevent from developing nuclear weapons, including North Korea and Iran. The organization that is to implement the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty has installed 75 percent of its verification structure, an alarm system that monitors the entire globe for nuclear explosions.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2003
Dear Mr. Azrael: Please advise if property ground rent should be billed and paid in advance or after the given time period. Thank you very much. Bruce and Elaine Chilcote Baltimore Dear Mr. and Mrs. Chilcote: Property ground rent is paid "in arrears." Here's an example: Suppose a property is subject to a $120 annual ground rent, payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July of each year. On Jan. 1, $60 in ground rent is due for the period July 1, 2002, through Dec. 31, 2002.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
PRESIDENT Clinton's annual speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday was an eloquent plea to use the world body to battle poverty, prevent mass killing and protect children from nuclear, chemical and biological warfare. Every word rang hollow.The Clinton administration has found the United Nations increasingly useful. Only five years ago, it blocked the Security Council from acting against genocide in Rwanda. Now, in a sea change of attitude, it has obtained U.N. cloaking for an Australian-led peace-keeping force in East Timor.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville and Bill Atkinson and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
Two sisters have filed a lawsuit against Monica L. Coleman, co-founder of the bankrupt downtown financial advisory firm of Coleman Craten LLC, alleging that she defrauded them of about $200,000 in retirement money.And a former bar owner, who closed her bar and restaurant to relocate it in the Coleman Craten Financial Club downtown, is suing Coleman, alleging that Coleman reneged on a promise to pay her $150,000, and failed to repay a debt of $39,000.In both lawsuits, Monica Coleman's husband, Richard A. Coleman Sr., is for the first time named as a co-defendant.
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