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By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1997
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld yesterday the convictions of Lawrence T. Horn, who arranged the 1993 murders of his ex-wife, their quadriplegic and brain-damaged son and the child's nurse.The three-judge panel rejected six issues raised by Horn's lawyers. The issues dealt with procedural rulings and whether evidence, such as information from Horn's wiretapped conversations and his videotaped deposition for a civil trial, should have been allowed as evidence in his 1996 murder trial.
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BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
A Major League Baseball panel's recent decision would rewrite the economics of the relationship between the Orioles and Washington Nationals, diverting tens of millions of dollars in annual profits from the regional television network that primarily benefit the Baltimore team, according to baseball sources. The private decision, made by three club owners selected by Commissioner Bud Selig, would diminish the amount of money the Orioles receive under a 2005 agreement establishing how money from Mid-Atlantic Sports Network is to be divided by the neighboring teams.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Campaign aides to Democratic Sen. John Kerry solicited contributions from Johnny Chung, a controversial Democratic fund-raiser, after the Massachusetts senator's Washington office helped arrange a visit to the Securities and Exchange Commission for Chung and some foreign business associates.Chung's nearly $400,000 in contributions to the Democratic Party are a focus of the Justice Department's inquiry into improper campaign fund raising in the 1996 elections.According to a report published yesterday in the Los Angeles Times, Chung, a California businessman, reimbursed his employees for contributing to Kerry's campaign at a reception he held for the Democratic senator at a California hotel in September 1996.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A U.S. Court of Appeals panel has upheld a decision that Maryland strayed into federal-only territory when it tried to jump start construction of a power plant with subsidies. The Maryland Public Service Commission, concerned about reliability problems if more power plants aren't built, struck a deal for ratepayers to subsidize a natural gas-fired facility in Waldorf any time the wholesale price for its electricity fell below a certain level. The plant was slated to open next year.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
A 35-year-old nurse pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday in the shooting death of her husband during a robbery of their Woodlawn home that police say she arranged. Rena Filipiak entered an Alford plea yesterday as a jury was about to hear opening statements in her trial on first-degree felony murder charges. An Alford plea means that Filipiak does not admit guilt but acknowledges that evidence would be sufficient to convict her if the case were tried.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
Maybe twice a year, William Whitley's sister places flowers at his polished granite gravestone in Parkwood Cemetery -- even though he's alive and well and living in Baltimore County.For Mary Raver and her four surviving children, death no longer holds financial worries: Their funerals are arranged and paid for.These Marylanders are just a few of the increasing number of Americans -- industry watchers and local mortuaries say the number has tripled in the past decade -- who aren't waiting to die before the funeral is planned.
NEWS
August 2, 2009
Phil Meagher Phil had arranged that his body be donated to the Anatomy Board of Maryland as his father and mother had done.
NEWS
November 30, 2005
On November 23, 2005, ALLAN THOMAS HOLSING of Westminster House, Baltimore, MD, husband of the late Jane Holsing. Uncle of A. Paul Hnida. A Service will be held Thursday, December 1 at 10:45 A.M. in the Chapel of the Maryland Veterans Cemetery, Garrison Forest. Arranged by the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home, Inc.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
Charles County lost more than $8 million in risky "derivative" investments -- triple the amount previously reported, according to the county attorney, who has filed a lawsuit against the brokers who arranged the investments.Original estimates last fall put the county's loss at $2.8 million. But County Attorney Roger Lee Fink said yesterday that the loss is now believed to total about $8.5 million."We've said all along, since we first discovered this situation last July, that we would seek all possible legal action to recover all of the county's money," he said.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
* Bullpens include an 18-foot heated dugout, telephone, water fountain, restroom and cable-television hookup.* A flag court beyond the right-field wall will have pennants of the American League teams arranged by division standings.* On April 2, there will be a pep rally for the Orioles outside the ballpark, next to the B&O warehouse, at 7 p.m.* Oriole Park at Camden yards is opened to the national media and 400 reporters swarm over the new stadium.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. is one of several large broadcasters that could be forced to sell television stations or other assets or rethink future acquisitions under new media ownership rules the Federal Communications Commission is set to consider later this month. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler proposed changes that would restrict the number of TV stations controlled by a single owner in a market, a step designed to protect competition and diversity in local media. Specifically, the FCC is examining broadcasters' use of sharing arrangements for sales as well as facilities and employees.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2014
Grace Carroll Swarm, a former partner in a Stevenson gift shop and a talented flower arranger, died Jan. 6 of a heart attack at Howard County General Hospital. The Owings Mills resident was 79. The daughter of William Hudson, owner of the Hudson Investment company, and Louise Hudson, a homemaker, the former Grace Carroll Hudson was born and raised in the Greenspring Valley. Mrs. Swarm, who never used her first name, attended Garrison Forest School and graduated in 1952 from Noroton School of the Convent of the Sacred Heart in Greenwich, Conn.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge said he is considering holding city prosecutors in contempt after they arranged a secret "lunch date" between two cooperating witnesses in a high-profile murder trial, but said he would not throw out the case or grant a mistrial. Judge Emanuel Brown said he found the prosecutors' actions "contemptible" and said they "violated the process in a way that cannot be tolerated. " Brown said he would defer a decision on discipline until after trial. Defense attorneys complained that they should have been told of the meeting, which they said could be construed as a "benefit" for the witnesses and running afoul of rules instructing witnesses not to discuss testimony.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
An 85-year-old man who met a female escort online was beaten and robbed when he arranged to meet her in a Glen Burnie parking lot, Anne Arundel County police said. The man told police he and the woman were to meet in the parking lot of the Days Inn in the 6600 block of Ritchie Highway at about 10 p.m. Sunday. Instead, two men wearing ski masks approached his car, opened the door and demanded his wallet, and punched him in the face. The men made off with the elderly man's shoulder bag, which contained money.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
An undercover federal agent in Maryland played a key role in the shutdown Wednesday of what authorities describe as a massive online drug marketplace called the Silk Road, whose owner allegedly began scheming to kill perceived rivals. Authorities say Ross William Ulbricht, a 29-year-old San Francisco engineer with a physics degree, built his site into the Amazon of illegal narcotics. He is accused of serving “several thousand drug dealers” since January 2011, with sales exceeding $1 billion and transactions occurring with a virtual currency called Bitcoin.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
A federal judge has ruled unconstitutional an arrangement approved by state regulators to allow construction of a new power plant in Southern Maryland, an effort to increase locally produced electricity before tight supply causes reliability problems. By setting the price that the plant's operator would receive for wholesale electricity over 20 years, Maryland's Public Service Commission tried to pre-empt federal authority, the decision found. That violated the supremacy clause of the Constitution, which states that federal law wins out in cases where state law conflicts.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Capital Saxophone Quartet, the award-winning saxophone ensemble known for its versatile mix of classical, jazz and contemporary music, will herald the arrival of spring at Western Maryland College on Sunday, April 7 during the season-closing presentation of the Sundays of Note performance series.For its second appearance at Sundays ofNote in three years, the quartet will present the premiere of its first commissioned work, "Constellations," by Baltimore composer G.S. Geiger.In addition, the quartet will offer La Primavera by Antonio Vivaldi; Trois Pices by Isaac Albniz, arranged by Giuseppe Mul; Orfeo Suite, by Claudio Monteverdi; Quatuor, Op. 102 by Florent Schmitt; the traditional "That's a-Plenty," arranged by Paul Nagle; and "St. Louis Blues," arranged by Bill Holcombe.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 15, 2001
Western Maryland College is seeking student and nonstudent musicians to play in its Concert Band. The 60-member band is open to musicians ranging from high school students to seniors. Starting Aug. 29, the band will practice from 7 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Wednesdays in the addition to Levine Hall off Main Street. The fall semester concert will be held Dec. 7 and will feature a newly arranged work featuring soundtrack highlights from Pearl Harbor. Interested musicians can call Linda Kirkpatrick at 410-857-2550 for an interview.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A viewing for former NBA player Devin Gray will be held Friday from 3 to 7 p.m. at Phillip's Funeral Home, 1727 N. Monroe Street, Baltimore, MD 21217. The funeral will be held 9:30 a.m. Saturday, preceded by a wake at 9 a.m., at St. Frances, 501 East Chase Street, Baltimore, MD 21202. Gray, 41, who starred at St. Frances and in college at Clemson before playing for three NBA teams from 1996 to 2000, died of a heart attack Saturday in Atlanta. An account has been set up at Wells Fargo bank to help the family with funeral costs.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 15, 2013
Citing reports of drug dealing, loitering, littering and other nuisances, Hampden merchants and a Baltimore City councilwoman are calling on the state to close a 3-year-old methadone clinic that overlooks The Avenue. "We want them shut down," City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke advocated, saying the drug abuse treatment clinic, Hampden Health Solutions at the Rail Inc., has been a constant source of complaints since it opened in 2010 at 3612 Falls Road, overlooking West 36th Street and within walking distance of several schools and the Roosevelt Park Recreation Center.
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