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By DAN BERGER | October 6, 2000
Next time, they should think of this not a a debate but an audition. The actor who can most convincingly portray a president gets the part. Elect Martin Sheen! Serbs storm the parliament building. Americans prefer just to watch "Dark Angel." If only the Hamilton community could preserve the unity that arose against new neighbors, for other causes. Fuzzy nembers are the best.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2011
A man has been charged with first-degree arson in a Elkridge motel fire, which Howard County police said resulted from a domestic dispute. Police said Barry Lee Murphy, 48, started a fire Monday in the room at the White Elk Motel on U.S. 1 belonging to a female acquaintance, with whom Murphy had been involved in a domestic dispute earlier in the day. Officers were called to the motel at 8:45 p.m. Monday for a trespassing complaint at Room E....
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NEWS
December 18, 2004
Agnes Mary Mansour, 73, who gave up her religious vows rather than resign as Michigan's welfare director in a showdown with the Vatican over abortion, died Friday. Controversy arose in the 1980s over her role as a nun and as head of an agency that oversaw Medicaid funding for abortions for low-income women. The Vatican told Mansour to either resign as director of the agency or be dismissed from the Sisters of Mercy.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 17, 2010
The Maryland Senate adopted a measure Wednesday to strip state lawmakers of retirement pay if they are convicted of crimes related to their public duties, an issue that came to their attention after former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon kept her $83,000 a year city pension as she stepped down as part of a plea agreement for stealing gift cards. The proposal was backed by Sen. Andrew P. Harris, a Baltimore County Republican running for Congress, and was the only successful part of a broader package he proposed that affected lawmaker compensation.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
A dispute with the Naval Academy over sewer bills has been settled, Annapolis officials said yesterday.After a series of offers and counteroffers, the city has agreed to reduce the academy's quarterly bill by $10,000 for the next 12 bills, until April 1999. The Naval Academy's average quarterly bill is about $150,000.The fight began last year when the Navy Department accused the city of overbilling the academy by $357,881 for sewer service after a construction problem inflated the meter readings.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 25, 1996
As scientists absorb the decision by a federal appeals panel late last week dismissing all the charges of scientific misconduct against Dr. Theresa Imanishi-Kari, many are asking how the process for handling allegations of fraud in science could have got so badly off track.The decadelong case has roused high passions among scientists, some of whom saw it as a barometer of the public's apparent hostility toward science, while others were alarmed at the way the case had turned into a political confrontation with Congress.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 20, 1991
WITH the usual apologies to Clement C. Moore . . .*'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the roomThe sound of my cursing added much to the gloom.A Phillip's head screwdriver I twirled now with care,A Fisher-Price dollhouse causing all this despair.The children were nestled all snug in their beds,While visions of Super Nintendo danced in their heads.And mama with her Salems and I in my Bears cap,Tried to figure how much this would set us all back.*When out near the garbage cans there arose such a clatter,"That damn raccoon!"
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Is Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., accused by critics of behaving like a private company at times, ready to become a private entity? That seemed to be the million-dollar question during the Hunt Valley broadcast company's conference call yesterday to discuss first-quarter earnings. The company tossed cold water on the idea as quickly as it entertained it, however. Sinclair executives have long asserted that the company's stock is undervalued. Its shares rose 51 cents, or nearly 7 percent, yesterday to close at $8. The company believes its worth is closer to $12. Barton Crockett, an analyst with JPMorgan, asked hypothetically why the company doesn't revert to private status if it believes it isn't earning its worth in the public markets.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | April 28, 2003
Nicholas Jules Merdon was born to Michelle Karen Melotti and County Councilman Christopher J. Merdon on April 7. Melotti, a radiologist, is on maternity leave for eight weeks. "I'm enjoying every minute of it," she said. "Holding him as much as I can. You appreciate so much more after you've already had the first one because you realize how quickly they grow. So I'm trying to savor every day." Nicholas' sister, April Dominique, will be 3 years old Thursday. The couple moved to Howard County from Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 14, 2002
Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi may have been the first famous father-daughter team of artists, but that was way back during the 17th century in Italy. Today, the tradition is carried on in Baltimore by R.G. Book and his offspring, Darsie Book, whose show at Mount Washington's Beveled Edge Gallery is a family reunion that brings the art of father and daughter together after years of separation. Book pere is a sculptor whose meticulously crafted works of wood, metal and stone are all permutations of the skeletal structure of the human spine.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | December 21, 2008
Police say a 28-year-old man was fatally shot in Mount Vernon after two men burst into his apartment building and placed a gun to his mother's head. The shooting occurred Dec. 6 in the 700 block of N. Howard St. Travis Makofski, 28, lived in a first-floor rear apartment with his mother, who was superintendent of the building. About 2:15 a.m., the doorbell rang and the mother went to the front entrance door of the triplex. Two men shoved the door open and one of them placed a gun to her head, police said.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 26, 2008
The stabbing of a Howard County 17-year-old by two teens outside The Mall in Columbia in January was the culmination of a drug deal gone bad, an investigator said yesterday. New details of the incident emerged at a hearing in Howard County Circuit Court, during which a judge denied a request that the 16-year-old defendant be tried as a juvenile. Cordero Dante Taylor was charged as an adult in the Jan. 10 stabbing of Julian Lichtenstein, who was 17 at the time of the incident. Taylor, of Forestville in Prince George's County, and the other suspect, Bernardo Leconte, 18, of Columbia, were charged with attempted first- and second-degree murder, first- and second-degree assault, carrying a concealed weapon and reckless endangerment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
CLARIFICATION - A headline in the Maryland section yesterday could have left the impression that a man convicted of shooting a neighbor in a botched robbery and drug deal in Glen Burnie was sentenced to two months in jail. As the story said, Ronald Francis Dawson II was sentenced to one year in jail, dating to when he was arrested in December. He is expected to be released within the next two months. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 14, 2006
A judge in Baltimore has dismissed misconduct allegations against two federal prosecutors and has blamed defense attorneys for guiding their clients into guilty plea agreements that failed to protect them from a more serious indictment. The order released yesterday by U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. vindicates the approach taken by prosecutors Jason M. Weinstein and Steven H. Levin in the case of Howard and Raeshio Rice, two brothers about to stand trial on charges that they ran a violent drug gang in the Baltimore region.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 19, 2005
NEW YORK - Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc. didn't defraud Allegheny Energy Inc. four years ago when the financial services giant sold its energy-trading unit to the utility, and Merrill is owed $115 million from the transaction, a federal judge ruled yesterday. U.S. District Judge Harold Baer Jr. said in a written opinion that Merrill, the world's No. 2 securities firm by market value, didn't inflate revenue at its Global Energy Markets before selling the unit to Allegheny in 2001. "Allegheny collects nothing on its claims," Baer said.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Is Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., accused by critics of behaving like a private company at times, ready to become a private entity? That seemed to be the million-dollar question during the Hunt Valley broadcast company's conference call yesterday to discuss first-quarter earnings. The company tossed cold water on the idea as quickly as it entertained it, however. Sinclair executives have long asserted that the company's stock is undervalued. Its shares rose 51 cents, or nearly 7 percent, yesterday to close at $8. The company believes its worth is closer to $12. Barton Crockett, an analyst with JPMorgan, asked hypothetically why the company doesn't revert to private status if it believes it isn't earning its worth in the public markets.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
COMES now the 350th anniversary of the birth of William Penn. In the spirit of neighborly love, and with real respect for this exemplar of the Religious Society of Friends, a message to the people of Pennsylvania: We hope thee'll have good weather for the ceremonies. (How it did rain, on the 350th anniversary of the Ark and the Dove, here below.)There are also going to be William Penn observances in Maryland, which after all was home to Quaker emigrants from England years before the Crown established Penn's Woods.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 18, 2000
Civilization began 5,500 years ago in the lush valley between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in Mesopotamia, now called Iraq. We know because we learned it in high school. Apparently we learned wrong, according to archaeologists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute. McGuire Gibson and his colleagues at the institute have unearthed the remains of a 5,500-year-old Syrian city that is at least as old as the better-known cities 400 miles southeast in Iraq. The discovery of the as-yet-unnamed city suggests that the human urge to live together, pool resources and cooperate for the greater good arose substantially earlier than is now believed, and perhaps in more than one place.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 15, 2005
NEW YORK - Tyco International Ltd.'s auditors knew about millions of dollars in bonuses that former Chief Executive Officer L. Dennis Kozlowski was later accused of stealing, a witness at his fraud trial testified yesterday. Patricia Prue, Tyco's former head of human resources, told jurors in a New York state court that the company's payroll and legal departments also knew about the payments, which were rewards to employees for their work on the public offering of shares in Tyco subsidiary TyCom Inc. The testimony supports the contention of lawyers defending Kozlowski and former finance chief Mark H. Swartz that their clients didn't keep the bonuses secret and that the company's board knew of or could have learned about the payments.
NEWS
December 18, 2004
Agnes Mary Mansour, 73, who gave up her religious vows rather than resign as Michigan's welfare director in a showdown with the Vatican over abortion, died Friday. Controversy arose in the 1980s over her role as a nun and as head of an agency that oversaw Medicaid funding for abortions for low-income women. The Vatican told Mansour to either resign as director of the agency or be dismissed from the Sisters of Mercy.
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