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Aromatherapy

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By Judy Foreman | December 29, 2006
Aromatherapy -- the use of plant oils to improve well-being -- sounds lovely, doesn't it? How wonderful if a whiff of lavender could make you feel drowsy, or a little dab of rosemary oil could relieve muscle pain. There's certainly a plausible biological basis for the idea that smells can have direct effects on the body. On the yucky side, for instance, nothing makes me nauseous faster than the odor of those pine tree-shaped air fresheners that taxi drivers hang in their cabs. On the positive side, there's nothing like the scent of a fresh Christmas tree to evoke warm memories of childhood.
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman | December 29, 2006
Aromatherapy -- the use of plant oils to improve well-being -- sounds lovely, doesn't it? How wonderful if a whiff of lavender could make you feel drowsy, or a little dab of rosemary oil could relieve muscle pain. There's certainly a plausible biological basis for the idea that smells can have direct effects on the body. On the yucky side, for instance, nothing makes me nauseous faster than the odor of those pine tree-shaped air fresheners that taxi drivers hang in their cabs. On the positive side, there's nothing like the scent of a fresh Christmas tree to evoke warm memories of childhood.
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FEATURES
By Lydia Martin and Lydia Martin,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 16, 1993
If this page were scented, it might be scented with essence of tangerine, said to bring cheer and light to the ordinary and mundane.Or maybe marjoram, touted for its ability to ease irritability, worry and tension.Or ylang-ylang, supposed to help inspire one's appreciation for beauty.Whatever the essence, we would want you to be feeling good right now. Sort of warm all over. Comfortable. Content. And compelled to continue reading.You can't get aromatherapy from your newspaper. Yet.But you can get it from your hair stylist, masseuse, chiropractor, doctor and New Age healer.
NEWS
By ELISSA PETRUZZI and ELISSA PETRUZZI,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 12, 2006
Mundo, just a year old, wasn't getting better, and Sevi Kay didn't know what to do. Mundo's skin was so irritated she had wounds from scratching herself, and the doctor's treatments weren't working. That's when the Glen Burnie woman decided to see what she could do for her beloved German shepherd puppy. "She started healing, she got better, she gained more weight," after applying Kay's homemade remedy. Mundo's coat became so shiny a neighbor noticed and asked Kay what she was using.
FEATURES
By Diane Winston | March 14, 1991
Think bar. Think smell. Think smoke, sweat and beer.Now think again.At Turner's, a modest-looking watering hole in Federal Hill, the air smells sweet. A scent, gently tickling the brain, pricks the edge of memory. Sometimes it's cedar, redolent of winter holidays. Other times it's eucalyptus, Mother's warm compresses on the chest.Customers at the bar keep time to Motown and swill their beer. It's relaxed here and the regulars say it has something to do with the small, cream-colored machine gurgling behind the bar."
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder | August 26, 1991
So, you think you've tried everything to combat jet lag after a long international airline flight, and nothing really seems to work?How about slathering your body in aromatic oils, the same ones Princess Diana uses to relieve stress?Aromatherapy, which uses your sense of smell to enhance mood and physical well-being, now is being applied in a serious way by two international airlines to try to help travelers overcome jet lag-induced fatigue, disorientation and inability to sleep at normal times.
NEWS
By Robin Fields and Robin Fields,Los Angeles Times | March 5, 2000
Tina Rocca-Lundstrom dips her head toward the candle dubbed Meditation and takes a sniff. The label says it contains patchouli and ylang-ylang, pure essential oils. True enough, but Rocca-Lundstrom, with her trained chemist's nose, also picks up a hint of synthetic perfume. "None of this is real," she says. "None of it." Controversy is intruding into the mellow, lavender-scented world of aromatherapy, the quasi-science of smells that purportedly enhance health, mood and brain function.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | December 20, 1998
It's beginning to smell a lot like Christmas.Not the buttery aromas of baking cookies or the scent of pine, but something much more complicated.Scented candles, potpourri, upscale incense, room sprays, environmental oils, fragrant drawer liners, scented hangers: These are only some of this season's gifts designed to appeal to what Helen Keller once called "the fallen angel of the senses.""People have rediscovered the sense of smell in the last decade," says Annette Green, president of the Olfactory Research Fund.
FEATURES
By Beverly Hall Lawrence and Beverly Hall Lawrence,Newsday | January 9, 1994
Not too many years from now, alarm clocks will not buzz but will instead squirt aromas blended to stimulate sleepy heads into alertness.By the year 2000, one researcher predicts, people will be using scents in their homes to stimulate or curb their appetites, and they'll work at terminals that dispense odors designed to keep them more productive. People will go home and exercise in rooms filled with an odor to make them feel invigorated. After dinner, how about a whiff of the amorous stuff?
FEATURES
By Gwen Salley-Schoen and Gwen Salley-Schoen,McClatchy News Service | August 14, 1991
The party turns into a bore so you add a little peppermint to the air-conditioning system and suddenly everyone is full of energy.You're in the middle of an argument with the boss and he or she sprays you with a mixture of lavender, carrot and tarragon and suddenly you feel totally relaxed and agreeable.The latest in the sensory revolution is aromatherapy. We're talking about taking the smell of victory -- or stress reduction, stimulation, or energy -- literally. We're talking about controlling human behavior by spritzing the air with peppermint or lily of the valley.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 19, 2006
STEAL OF THE WEEK GET A FRESH FACE Bliss comes in many forms, and one of them is a 70-minute Stress Buster aromatherapy massage at Life Smells Good (935 S. Charles St., Federal Hill, 410-234-0333). Theresa Cangialosi and her staff of certified massage therapists are all well versed in the art of aromatherapy. If you're stressed, they'll use relaxation oils like lavender, rose or chamomile. If you're sore, "muscular" oils like geranium and eucalyptus will be in the mix. The massage itself, of course, will be deeply relaxing.
NEWS
By FRANCES INGRAHAM HEINS and FRANCES INGRAHAM HEINS,ALBANY (N.Y.) TIMES UNION | January 8, 2006
Scented rooms make a lot of sense. The reason: Some smells have a calming or happy effect, others evoke fond memories, encourage us to linger or even think well of others. Driven by the desire for pleasant smelling interiors, 80 percent of American adults purchased some kind of home fragrance product in 2004. According to Unity Marketing in Stevens, Pa., sales of candles and home fragrances reached $8.4 billion in 2004, a growth of 14.1 percent over the previous year. "Since 9 / 11, people have been more home-oriented," says Terry Molnar, executive director of the Sense and Smell Institute in New York.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
The Hotel Teatro, a boutique hotel across from the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, has a Fall Shopping Getaway package through Dec. 1. Guests pay $165 a night for a standard room with queen bed or $195 a night for a superior room with king bed. Also included is transportation to shopping, a discount card and an in-room aromatherapy bath. Taxes extra. Call 888-727-1200 or visit hotelteatro.com.
NEWS
By Carole McShane and Carole McShane,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2004
LOOKING FOR a wedding gift? Estate jewelry to jazz up your wardrobe? Want to pamper yourself with handmade soap and creamy lotions? Natural Bath Works, a new boutique in an old chapel, offers all this plus in-store parties and, soon, chamber music. Natural Bath Works opened in August in the former Westwood Methodist Church on Triadelphia Road in Glenelg. The store is the creation of Michelle Quader, who with her husband, Glenn, 37, their son James, 18, and daughter, Kaila, 15, moved to Maryland from Boca Raton, Fla., in the summer of 2001.
NEWS
By Jenny Deam and Jenny Deam,The Denver Post | February 29, 2004
When their little darling is smack in the middle of a tantrum approaching biblical proportions, what parents wouldn't love to reach for a magic potion that could calm the wrath of toddlerhood? Chicago inventor Joe Culotta says he has the answer in a spray bottle. He calls his pungent invention Child Calm, an aromatherapy mist that promises to almost instantly peel your offspring off the wall. Made from high-potency lavender and chamomile oils, Child Calm smells vaguely like Orange Glo household cleanser and costs $15.95 (plus shipping)
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | January 18, 2004
Not sleeping very well? If a restless night is a regular occurrence, you might try the new LifeWise Aromatherapy Sleep Machine. The device uses sound and scent to relax and, it is hoped, gently coax you to sleep. Choose from six soothing sounds (brook, ocean, rain, forest, wind and train), which emanate from the unit itself or a movable pillow speaker (above, left). The volume can be adjusted so it won't disturb your bedmate, and can be set to run for 30, 60 or 90 minutes or all night long.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 23, 2005
The Hotel Teatro, a boutique hotel across from the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, has a Fall Shopping Getaway package through Dec. 1. Guests pay $165 a night for a standard room with queen bed or $195 a night for a superior room with king bed. Also included is transportation to shopping, a discount card and an in-room aromatherapy bath. Taxes extra. Call 888-727-1200 or visit hotelteatro.com.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | February 19, 2006
STEAL OF THE WEEK GET A FRESH FACE Bliss comes in many forms, and one of them is a 70-minute Stress Buster aromatherapy massage at Life Smells Good (935 S. Charles St., Federal Hill, 410-234-0333). Theresa Cangialosi and her staff of certified massage therapists are all well versed in the art of aromatherapy. If you're stressed, they'll use relaxation oils like lavender, rose or chamomile. If you're sore, "muscular" oils like geranium and eucalyptus will be in the mix. The massage itself, of course, will be deeply relaxing.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | September 28, 2003
Can I really turn jumping rope, a favorite pastime of my childhood, into a workout? If so, how do I get started? If you can keep it up for 15-20 minutes at a moderate to intense pace, jumping rope is a great full-body cardiovascular workout. It's also inexpensive and will be there for you rain or shine. Start by finding a rope with some heft to it (a beaded one is ideal). Jump lightly, with your elbows in and shoulders relaxed. When done right, jumping rope should be easier on your joints than jogging.
NEWS
By Judy Hevrdejs and Judy Hevrdejs,Special to the Sun | April 6, 2003
You have something like 32 teeth in your mouth -- give or take a few wisdom teeth. If you were so inclined, you could brush each tooth with a different paste -- there are enough out there to do so -- thanks to a culture that celebrates individualism and manufacturers happy to be part of that celebration. "If you think about what consumers are used to seeing -- more targeted products -- it would only make sense, then, that the oral-care category and the toothpaste category would follow suit," said Kim Feil, division president for worldwide innovation at Information Resources Inc., a market researcher in Chicago.
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