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Arnold Schwarzenegger

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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 6, 2012
"You can't run from your mistakes. You have to confront them. " -- Arnold Schwarzenegger Believe it or not, there was a time when people didn't go on TV to confess their sins. That was back when most understood what sin is, before everything became excusable, especially for celebrities and the politically powerful. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is on a media tour promoting his book, "Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story. " It certainly is. On "60 Minutes," in USA Today and elsewhere, Mr. Schwarzenegger acknowledges affairs with women not his wife and the son he fathered with their housekeeper.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 6, 2012
"You can't run from your mistakes. You have to confront them. " -- Arnold Schwarzenegger Believe it or not, there was a time when people didn't go on TV to confess their sins. That was back when most understood what sin is, before everything became excusable, especially for celebrities and the politically powerful. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is on a media tour promoting his book, "Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story. " It certainly is. On "60 Minutes," in USA Today and elsewhere, Mr. Schwarzenegger acknowledges affairs with women not his wife and the son he fathered with their housekeeper.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1999
While "Toy Story 2" and "Princess Mononoke" show audiences that animated features can be just as fluid and expressive as their live-action counterparts, there are live-action movies that seem determined to be as two-dimensional as possible.Enter "End of Days," as idiotic, ugly and ridiculous a case in point as can be imagined.Arnold Schwarzenegger (just what computer animation program created him?) plays a burned-out security guard who foils a plot by Satan (Gabriel Byrne, changing accents more often than Kathleen Turner)
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | August 2, 2012
I had low expectations for the remake of"Total Recall,"one of my favorite movies. And it appears that they have been met. The movies are based on the great Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. " Dick was asci-fi master, and his works have been adpated for many other movies, including "Minority Report," "King of the Elves" and"The Adjustment Bureau. " The original, 1990 "Total Recall," which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, dealt with the blurred line between memory and reality as the hero confronted an improbable plot.
NEWS
April 24, 1991
Arnold Schwarzenegger will be appearing at Millersville Elementary school today as part of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's visit to the school to talk about fitness.Millersville Elementary will be closeddue to an in-service day. Schwarzenegger, who is the president's ambassador on fitness will be at the school at 8:30 a.m. to meet the public. A bus will leave at 7:45 a.m. from Our Lady of the Field Catholic Church on Millersville Road. Two buses will leave at 7:45 a.m. fromBaldwin Methodist Church on Route 178.Schwarzenegger has appeared in such action films as "KindergartenCop," "Total Recall" and will be in the upcoming "Terminator 2: Judgement Day."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2005
For years in his Austrian homeland, the tabloid papers affectionately referred to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as "Our Arnie." Yesterday, after he refused to pardon convicted murderer Stanley "Tookie" Williams, the headline stripped across one of the country's largest newspapers was "Terminator." Williams was executed by lethal injection early yesterday morning after a worldwide campaign to persuade Schwarzenegger or U.S. courts to spare him. In Schwarzenegger's home province of Styria, liberal Green Party leaders in the provincial capital of Graz moved to strip him of his honorary citizenship and rename the local Arnold Schwarzenegger sports stadium.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Staff Writer | November 2, 1992
Reading "Et Tu, Babe" is sort of like dropping a tab of methamphetamine and watching a simulcast of MTV, a three-ring circus and "Saturday Night Live" while a Guns N' Roses tape blares from the headphones of your Walkman.Got all that? From the opening of Mark Leyner's hysterically convoluted new novel, your brain is assailed with a dizzying array of hallucinogenic scenes, twisted characters and ridiculously improbable plot developments that is the closest thing to sensory overload achieved through the written word.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | October 12, 2003
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Standing before a roomful of fellow Ph.D.s, Louise Krasneiwicz wears an untucked shirt -- a multihued collage of musclemen and "championship" banners. Perched on a chair near her podium is a poster from Flex magazine featuring a bare-chested Arnold Schwarzenegger from his bodybuilding days. "We think that Arnold Schwarzenegger's extensive influence and remarkable presence in late 20th-century American culture has gone beyond inspiration, hero worship and entertainment," she tells the captive audience at the School of American Research here, where she is a research associate.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
Welcome to sweeps month, as the networks roll out their big guns . . . and probably more than a few duds. Sit back and endure.* "Carnie" (10 a.m.-11 a.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Today's topic: fathering Madonna's child. Why would anyone watch this stuff? ABC.* "Friends" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Remember the 1980s? The friends do; it's when they grew up. Tonight, Monica (Courteney Cox) drags out the prom videos, with predictably horrific results. NBC.* "Patriot Games" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and members of the Morning Features staff | December 30, 1990
Listen up, dudes.(Oops, sorry, that's out.)It's time again to distinguish between the daring and the de rigueur, to separate who's a shoo-in for stardom from who'd have to slap six cops and snare Donald Trump to get there.Ohhh, the choices boggled our minds. Would M. C. Hammer, hot pants or Evander Holyfield make our lists?Some did and some didn't. But we didn't just pick these out of thin, ozone-depleted air.Instead, we did research. Well, make that pseudo-research. We asked ourselves, "Was this something your parents would say, 'Huh?
NEWS
By Tom Matthews | June 28, 2007
It's come to this: The best hope for this grand experiment in democracy may hinge on the right billionaire coming along to buy his way into the White House. Now that we have made fundraising the benchmark against which all conventional campaigns are measured; now that it has become a requirement that big-pocketed special interests subsidize the elections of politicians who will be beholden to them; now that modestly funded, perhaps massively talented Americans need not even bother to aspire to the job (Headline from 2013 we will never see: "President Vilsack Saves Social Security, Declares Peace In Middle East")
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun staff | November 12, 2006
For years, political scientist Morris Fiorina has been going against the tide of conventional political wisdom that points to the growing polarization of the nation's electorate. The Stanford faculty member says that voters are not all that polarized, that there is actually a broad consensus on many seemingly divisive issues. He blames the political system for forcing voters to stake out polarized positions. "I'm feeling really good today," Fiorina said after last week's elections. "I think it was the revenge of moderation, the revenge of the middle."
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- California's governor says he's an "Arnold Republican," not a "Bush Republican." But in many ways, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and President Bush are in the same boat, with one exception: Schwarzenegger is running for re-election this year. Largely as a result of his own mistakes, Schwarzenegger's political standing has fallen as low as the president's. His competence has been called into question, and while the governor isn't grappling with foreign policy failures, his agenda has stalled because of resistance from fellow Republicans, just as Bush's has. "I've thought a lot about the last year and the mistakes I made and the lessons I've learned," Schwarzenegger said in a mea culpa speech that callers to his campaign headquarters hear when they're put on hold.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2005
For years in his Austrian homeland, the tabloid papers affectionately referred to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as "Our Arnie." Yesterday, after he refused to pardon convicted murderer Stanley "Tookie" Williams, the headline stripped across one of the country's largest newspapers was "Terminator." Williams was executed by lethal injection early yesterday morning after a worldwide campaign to persuade Schwarzenegger or U.S. courts to spare him. In Schwarzenegger's home province of Styria, liberal Green Party leaders in the provincial capital of Graz moved to strip him of his honorary citizenship and rename the local Arnold Schwarzenegger sports stadium.
NEWS
By PETER NICHOLAS AND MARK Z. BARABAK and PETER NICHOLAS AND MARK Z. BARABAK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger this week met the limits of his celebrity: Even a campaign built around his action-star persona could not persuade voters to embrace his "year of reform" agenda. Worse for Schwarzenegger, the special election he called to cement his power might have diminished it instead. All four measures he brought to the ballot - Propositions 74, 75, 76 and 77 - were rejected. Schwarzenegger staged a campaign intended to capitalize on his once-robust box-office appeal.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 16, 2005
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - A day after an aide said the issue was "much ado about nothing," Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger canceled his $5 million consulting contract with a magazine publisher yesterday amid widespread complaints that he had a conflict of interest with his job as California's chief executive. Schwarzenegger said he would forgo any compensation from Weider Publications: "I don't want there to be any question or doubt that the people have my full devotion." Under the contract - formalized two days before Schwarzenegger was sworn into office - he would have received his first paycheck from American Media, a successor of Weider, in 2006.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | August 2, 2012
I had low expectations for the remake of"Total Recall,"one of my favorite movies. And it appears that they have been met. The movies are based on the great Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. " Dick was asci-fi master, and his works have been adpated for many other movies, including "Minority Report," "King of the Elves" and"The Adjustment Bureau. " The original, 1990 "Total Recall," which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, dealt with the blurred line between memory and reality as the hero confronted an improbable plot.
NEWS
By Bill Whalen | August 15, 2003
STANFORD, Calif. -- A Republican political novice from Hollywood seeks to oust an unpopular Democratic governor of California. He's met with skepticism: Can an actor also be a producer and director of state government? But in the end, the guy gets the girl -- in this case, not just one girl but a nation-state of 35 million men and women looking for answers to a slow economy and political lethargy. Sound familiar? It should. It's the script for California's Oct. 7 recall election, where the early front-runner is Arnold Schwarzenegger.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | January 11, 2005
CHICAGO - Arnold Schwarzenegger probably will never get to be president, but he may be able to do something far more ambitious, difficult and worthwhile: restore a measure of democracy to our democracy. In his State of the State address Wednesday, the California governor said he would convene the legislature to address several issues - one of them being the way the legislators hang on to their jobs. California draws congressional and legislative districts the way most states do, with those in power rigging things to stay in power.
NEWS
By Vincent J. Schodolski and Vincent J. Schodolski,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 4, 2004
LOS ANGELES - If there was any doubt about the strength of fledging Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's political power, it was laid to rest by the overwhelming support he mustered Tuesday for two key ballot measures. Schwarzenegger staked a great deal of political capital on the approval of the two measures meant to help the state out of its fiscal crisis and prevent similar problems. Just a couple weeks ago, opinion polls indicated that the propositions, known as Measures 57 and 58, were headed for a crushing defeat.
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