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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Tehuti Miles, a running back-wide-receiver-defensive back who served as an Army specialist in Afghanistan, recently worked out at Maryland's walk-on football tryouts. A New York Daily News profile in 2010 described Miles' service as a 19-year-old. "Using binoculars, night-vision goggles and a thermal imaging scope that detects warm things like people and animals, Miles protected his tiny 26-man unit as they slept or played dominos," the article said. The article quoted Miles talking about his feelings about the Taliban.  "I wish we could drop more bombs," Miles said in the article.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Grizell T. Parsons, a retired civilian employee of the Army Intelligence Command and a neighborhood activist, died Sept. 4 of a cerebral hemorrhage at her West Baltimore home. She was 88. The former Grizell Haynie was born and raised in Heathsville, Va., where she attended Northumberland County, Va., public schools. After graduating from Julius Rosenwald High School, she attended Virginia Union College. She moved to Baltimore in the 1940s and went to work at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, and later at Western Electric Corp.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Col. Erland A. Tillman, a decorated Army officer and noted civil engineer who helped design the Maryland Transit Administration's Metro subway from Owings Mills into downtown Baltimore, died of complications from heart failure Sept. 6 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime resident of Brightwood Retirement Community was 101. "He had two 28-year careers, both successful," said Russell Tillman, a nephew who lives in Mississippi. "He was an interesting man. " Colonel Tillman was born in Iowa, then raised in Minnesota, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, where his father was a Lutheran minister.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
"Aunt Millie" - as soldiers receiving care packages in Afghanistan affectionately refer to 95-year-old Vivian "Millie" Bailey - doesn't see an end in sight for the work her group does. Yet she and her volunteers are more than willing to take on more. "Whatever number of troops we have over there is too many," says the Running Brook resident, who has lived in Columbia since 1970. "Any time you have to send them toilet paper, and then any president says [the country] is meeting our troops' needs… well, that just makes me want to stand up and fuss and cuss," Bailey said.
NEWS
By Jeff Hutchinson | September 5, 2013
My oldest son turned 16 last month, and I took a day off from work to spend it with him. It was also my plan to get his learner's permit. I thought a trip to the Motor Vehicle Administration would make a great birthday present, and it would afford us some father-son bonding time. Yep, he was finally 16 and ready for another rite of passage and the freedom that comes with driving. As my wife loves to say, "How hard could it be?" I, of course, had no illusion that this would be easy.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Last season, Morgan State split 11 starts between quarterbacks Robert Council and Seth Higgins. The former started six games, while the latter started five. The rotation continued in 2013. Higgins, a junior from Edgewood, started the Bears' season opener against Army last Friday night, but did not complete the game won by the Black Knights, 28-12. The 6-foot-4, 230-pound Higgins completed just 2 of 3 passes for 27 yards and was sacked twice. He eventually gave way to Council, a 6-4, 215-pound redshirt junior, on the offense's third possession of the first quarter.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
For the fourth time in the past six years, Morgan State opened the season with a loss. But rather than be demoralized by last Friday night's 28-12 setback to Army, Bears coach Donald Hill-Eley found a few positives to be gleaned from the result. “It was a great matchup,” Hill-Eley said in a conference call Tuesday morning organized by the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. “I thought our guys played well. Minus a few mistakes here and there and a turnover, it would've been a totally different ballgame.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Morgan State (0-0) @ Army (0-0) When: Friday, 7 p.m. Site: Mitchie Stadium, West Point, N.Y. Radio: 88.9 FM WEAA Series: First meeting What's at stake: Under coach Donald Hill-Eley, Morgan State is 14-20 against nonconference opponents, but 6-6 in season openers. But the Bears finished last season on a dubious six-game losing streak during which they were outscored, 154-93. That ending left a bad taste in the mouths of the players and coaches, but this contest marks the beginning of four consecutive games away from Hughes Stadium and eight of 12 contests on the road.
NEWS
By Kenneth Lavon Johnson | August 27, 2013
In the spring of 1963, when I was a student at the U.S. Army's Judge Advocate General Corps School in Charlottesville, Va., the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to town to speak to the student body of the University of Virginia. At the time, my brother, Henry Floyd Johnson, was studying at UVA while also serving as the pastor of a church in Charlottesville. He had known King for some time, and took me to meet him on the evening that he was scheduled to speak. King greeted me warmly, and we chatted for about 15 minutes.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
Col. Denise R. Lind, the Army judge who sentenced Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison today after finding him guilty of turning hundreds of thousands of classified documents over to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks, clearly did not buy prosecutors' arguments that he was a self-aggrandizing traitor who deserved to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Nor did she completely accept the defense's claim that Mr. Manning was an emotionally troubled young man who had acted only out of patriotism to alert Americans to what he perceived to be government wrongdoing committed in their name.
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