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By THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - A newly published U.S. Army War College assessment concludes that more than three years after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the Bush administration has failed to define the overall aim of the war on terrorism. The report also warns that the cost of not having a coherent strategy is quickly rising as the insurgency drags on in Iraq. The analysis, by Professor Stephen D. Biddle, a leading researcher at the Army War College, suggests that the United States has failed to apply the necessary resources to match its stated goal of spreading democracy across the Middle East.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Curtis B. Reiber, an Army intelligence officer whose career spanned three decades, died Nov. 20 of a stroke at Saint Agnes Hospital. He was 77. The son of a DuPont Co. worker and a homemaker, Curtis Brooks Reiber was born in Centre Hall, Pa., and raised in Woodstown, N.J., where he graduated in 1954 from Woodstown High School. He was a 1958 graduate of Elizabethtown College in Elizabethtown, Pa., and earned a master's degree from Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant. Mr. Reiber was drafted into the Army in 1958 and the next year graduated from Officer Candidate School.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2002
When the 40-person staff of BreakAway Games, a computer-game maker in Hunt Valley, shuts down today to see Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones, management won't consider it goofing off. It will consider the retreat "research and development." "It's our religion. It's part of our culture. Without these sorts of things, the guys that work here can't get on," said Deborah Wahler, president of the company, which develops game software for the youth market as well as combat simulations for the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pa., and the NATO Defense College in Italy.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Faced with a need to expand the Army and ease recruitment problems, Army officials have decided to loosen the requirements for junior officer candidates - accepting prospects who exceed the current age limit by more than a decade, and permitting more flexibility to waive their minor criminal or civil offenses, according to a memo obtained by The Sun. The May 25 memo, sent to division commanders and other generals, said the Army hopes to...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Army War College has some disquieting news for the U.S. military: It's not ready for war with Iraq.In a 95-page report assessing the impressive performance of the Iraqi military during its eight-year war with Iran, Army experts concluded that Iraq's "authentic victory" was due to a well-trained and cagey fighting force, strongly supported by the population."
NEWS
May 13, 2003
PIKESVILLE - Lt. Col. John A. Russo recently assumed command of the 3rd Brigade, 29th Infantry Division (Light), Maryland Army National Guard, in change of command ceremonies at the Pikesville Military Reservation. Russo, 46, has served more than 20 years in the Maryland National Guard, most recently as the brigade executive officer of the 58th Troop Command. He is attending the U.S. Army War College. Russo, a Pasadena resident, takes over from Col. Robert L. Finn. Finn, a 53-year-old Westminster resident, served as the 3rd Brigade commander since 2001.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Curtis B. Reiber, an Army intelligence officer whose career spanned three decades, died Nov. 20 of a stroke at Saint Agnes Hospital. He was 77. The son of a DuPont Co. worker and a homemaker, Curtis Brooks Reiber was born in Centre Hall, Pa., and raised in Woodstown, N.J., where he graduated in 1954 from Woodstown High School. He was a 1958 graduate of Elizabethtown College in Elizabethtown, Pa., and earned a master's degree from Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant. Mr. Reiber was drafted into the Army in 1958 and the next year graduated from Officer Candidate School.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Faced with a need to expand the Army and ease recruitment problems, Army officials have decided to loosen the requirements for junior officer candidates - accepting prospects who exceed the current age limit by more than a decade, and permitting more flexibility to waive their minor criminal or civil offenses, according to a memo obtained by The Sun. The May 25 memo, sent to division commanders and other generals, said the Army hopes to...
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - A newly published U.S. Army War College assessment concludes that more than three years after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the Bush administration has failed to define the overall aim of the war on terrorism. The report also warns that the cost of not having a coherent strategy is quickly rising as the insurgency drags on in Iraq. The analysis, by Professor Stephen D. Biddle, a leading researcher at the Army War College, suggests that the United States has failed to apply the necessary resources to match its stated goal of spreading democracy across the Middle East.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2002
When the 40-person staff of BreakAway Games, a computer-game maker in Hunt Valley, shuts down today to see Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones, management won't consider it goofing off. It will consider the retreat "research and development." "It's our religion. It's part of our culture. Without these sorts of things, the guys that work here can't get on," said Deborah Wahler, president of the company, which develops game software for the youth market as well as combat simulations for the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle, Pa., and the NATO Defense College in Italy.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Army War College has some disquieting news for the U.S. military: It's not ready for war with Iraq.In a 95-page report assessing the impressive performance of the Iraqi military during its eight-year war with Iran, Army experts concluded that Iraq's "authentic victory" was due to a well-trained and cagey fighting force, strongly supported by the population."
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan | June 19, 2005
Col. John W. Ives Occupation: Installation commander of Fort George G. Meade, an Army post in western Anne Arundel County In the news: Ives, 50, signed off two weeks ago on a three-decade master plan by Fort Meade officials that manages growth in and around the 5,400-acre post, which is home to the National Security Agency. One of the provisions includes extending the Washington Metro's Green Line 10 miles north from Greenbelt to near Fort Meade, and potentially on to Baltimore. A day later, state Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan announced that his agency was separately working on a similar proposal.
FEATURES
By A. M. Chaplin | April 7, 1991
WHEN IT COMES TO FAMOUS grads, the war colleges of the Army and Navy have a big head start, since they've been around a lot longer than the others -- the Navy's since 1884 and the Army's since 1901. Acting Deputy Commandant Col. Donald E. Lunday of the Army War College, for example, reels off the names of big-gun graduates like Pershing, Lejeune, Bradley, Vandenberg, Halsey, Patton and Eisenhower just for starters.The Navy's war college, though, has the best war-college quote: Adm. Chester W. Nimitz said that with the single exception of the kamikaze attacks, nothing happened during the nation's war with Japan that hadn't already been played out in the war-gaming rooms at the war college.
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