Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArmy Reserve
IN THE NEWS

Army Reserve

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
As the wife of an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel, Cheri Fish says she and her family have changed residences 10 times in 10 years. She knows another move is in store when her husband says, "We need to talk. " Fish knows Army life can be hard on families who might not call any one place home for long. But she hopes members of the Fort Meade-based 3rd Training Support Battalion, 312 Regiment will remember that they can look back to Maryland for support. Her husband, Lt. Col. Calvin E. Fish, is commander for the battalion, which on Sunday held its Family Day event at Blob's Park in Jessup.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Samuel F. Baxter, who had careers in the Army and later railroading, died Thursday of heart failure at Heartlands of Severna Park. He was 97. The son of Mason Baxter and Myrtelle Baxter, farmers, Samuel Ford Baxter was born in Sudlersville and later moved to Denton. After graduating in 1933 from Caroline High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1938 in business administration from Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College, where he was in the Army Reserve. Mr. Baxter worked in Baltimore as an accountant with General Chemical Co. In November 1941, he was ordered to active duty as a second lieutenant with the Army Quartermaster Corps.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 20, 2006
Peter Paul Sokas, a retired Social Security analyst and Army Reserve officer, died of congestive heart failure Jan. 13 at St. Agnes Hospital. The Catonsville resident was 89. Born in Philadelphia, he helped support his family there from the age of 7 by selling newspapers outside the Fidelity Trust Building. Family members said that over the next 16 years, his newsstand grew until he became known throughout the area as "Pete the Fidelity." A Philadelphia Public Ledger article about Mr. Sokas in 1939 noted that he had earned his undergraduate tuition for the University of Pennsylvania from the newsstand.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Last in a series of profiles of gubernatorial candidates. As Anthony G. Brown runs for governor, he often appears to be walking a political tightrope. If the lieutenant governor tips too far in the direction of independence, he risks looking disloyal to Gov. Martin O'Malley, whose firm support has given him a leg up in the Democratic primary race. If he shows too much deference to O'Malley, he risks looking more like a sidekick than a leader in his own right. So far, if the polls are correct, Brown hasn't tumbled.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | November 5, 1993
Though its home and mission have changed over the years, "the 195th" has served honorably as a unit of the U.S. Army or Active Reserve for more than 50 years.The 195th, which is to be inactivated at Westminster tomorrow, was born in July 1942 at Fort Jackson, S.C. As the 195th Ordnance Company, it was sent to Germany during World War II and remained there until October 1945.During the period from 1945 to 1959, the unit served in active reserve or reserve status until it was once again activated in June 1959.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | January 7, 1995
During the early 1950s, the U.S. Army's 2053rd Reception Battalion processed nearly 600,000 soldiers."It'd been around for ages -- it gave these guys their first Army haircut and told them how to salute -- but nobody could tell me anything about it," said Keith Karas of Cockeysville, an Army Reserve drill sergeant and a veteran of the Baltimore-based 2053rd.After five years of research, Sergeant Karas has boxes of documents about the history of the unit. Now, it's really history. Next week, the Department of Defense will put the Reserve unit on "inactive" status as the shrinking of America's military continues.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - A senior Democrat on the Senate Armed Services Committee said yesterday that it was "deeply disturbing" that the head of the Army Reserve fears his force is reaching the breaking point due to the strains of overseas deployments and outdated personnel policies. Sen. Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat and a one-time officer with the Army's 82nd Airborne Division, was reacting to a memo from Lt. Gen. James R. "Ron" Helmly, chief of the Army Reserve, that appeared Tuesday in The Sun. Helmly wrote in the Dec. 20 memo to Army leaders that the 200,000-soldier Army Reserve was "rapidly degenerating into a `broken force.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - The chief of the Army Reserve warned yesterday that at the current pace of operations in places like Afghanistan and Iraq the Army faces a serious risk of running out of crucial specialists in the reserves who can be called up for active duty. The remarks by the officer, Lt. Gen. James R. Helmly, throw a spotlight on the military's existing mobilization authority, under which reserve and National Guard personnel can be summoned to active duty for no more than a total of 24 months, unless they volunteer to extend their tours.
NEWS
October 6, 2007
Howard H. Bosley, a retired Goodyear Tire manager who had been active in the Army Reserve, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at York Hospital in York, Pa. The former Owings Mills resident was 78. Born in Upperco, Mr. Bosley was a 1946 Towson High School graduate and earned a degree in agriculture and economics from the University of Maryland, College Park. He joined the Army in 1952 and served as an instructor at the U.S. Army Engineer School. He remained active in the reserves for many years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 1999
PHOENIX -- Steve May knew from the time he was in his early teens that he wanted to be a politician, specifically a conservative Republican politician. He carefully built his life, he says, to shape an attractive resume, from his decision to enter ROTC in college and then serve as an Army officer to his efforts at building a track record as a small-business man.It worked. May served with distinction as a lieutenant on active duty in the Army and then entered the Reserve, and last November he was elected to the state Legislature, to represent the affluent, conservative district where he had grown up.Everything seemed to be going just right until last winter, when the usually affable and measured 27-year-old bitterly spoke his mind in the Arizona House, this time not as a Republican, a Mormon or a soldier, but as a gay man.May denounced an ultimately failed bill that would have barred the use of public funds to pay for health benefits of same-sex partners, and also attacked the legislation's conservative sponsor, Rep. Karen S. Johnson, a fellow Republican who had vigorously attacked homosexuality as immoral.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 24, 2014
Now that veterans groups have condemned Doug Gansler for disparaging Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's military service, followed by Brown calling the attorney general's remarks "reckless and irresponsible," we can start to measure the consequence of Gansler's latest misstep in his quest to be Maryland's next governor. Knocking a veteran? On its surface, it sounds like a low blow - Gansler, the attorney general, suggesting that Brown's stint in Iraq as a military lawyer wasn't "a real job. " Here's what Gansler said Monday about his chief rival in the Democratic primary at a candidates forum in Bethesda: "I'm running against somebody who has never managed anything, never run anything.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
As the wife of an Army Reserve lieutenant colonel, Cheri Fish says she and her family have changed residences 10 times in 10 years. She knows another move is in store when her husband says, "We need to talk. " Fish knows Army life can be hard on families who might not call any one place home for long. But she hopes members of the Fort Meade-based 3rd Training Support Battalion, 312 Regiment will remember that they can look back to Maryland for support. Her husband, Lt. Col. Calvin E. Fish, is commander for the battalion, which on Sunday held its Family Day event at Blob's Park in Jessup.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
When his identical twin brother went missing in 2007, Wael Ali sought to organize a search party in Howard County to hunt for clues. Later, after the discovery of Wasel Ali's body, Wael set up a memorial page on Facebook where he lamented that they'd never spend time together again. "Nobody deserves to be murdered," Wael said at the time. On Thursday, Howard County police delivered a twist in the four-year-old case, charging Wael with murdering his brother. Officials in Cobb County, Ga., where Wael Ali had been living recently and where he was taken into custody, say Wasel had been put in a chokehold, crushing his neck.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
She was on her way to the food court, still deciding between a sandwich and a slice of pizza for dinner, when Sabaheta Alek-Finkelman spotted the men and women in uniform. "Would you like to record a shout-out to the troops overseas?" asked Army Spc. Nicholas Lomison, 19, in his friendliest salesman's voice. "It's free, you know. " Alek-Finkelman didn't hesitate. "Hello, military," she said into a camera and microphone set up near the Chili's Too at the Arundel Mills mall. "I'd like to extend my deepest gratitude for what you're doing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2011
Robert H. Bouse Sr., the retired Circuit Court for Baltimore City clerk who later became a chief deputy clerk at the federal Bankruptcy Court of Maryland, died of cancer Feb. 28 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 91. He was the son of John H. Bouse, former state senator who was also Baltimore's register of wills. Mr. Bouse, a Baltimore native, spent his life in the same home on South Ann Street in Fells Point. He was a 1936 Mount Saint Joseph High School graduate and attended Loyola College and the University of Baltimore Law School.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2010
John Burner Jr. always worried about the safety of his sons while they served in Iraq, but he was confident in the medical response for injured comrades. But the Catonsville man is left with doubts about the military's treatment of noncombat ailments after his eldest, Sgt. John F. Burner III, 32, died Thursday in Iskandariya while awaiting treatment for a respiratory illness as he traveled to join his battalion. "You're trained in trauma, but you're not trained for the common cold, or flu, or H1N1," said John Burner, 56. His son was a satellite systems team chief assigned to the 63rd Signal Battalion (Expeditionary)
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | January 10, 2010
N one are so old, Thoreau once wrote, as those who have outlived their enthusiasms. By that standard, Sgt. Maj. Raymond Moran, the most chronologically advanced recruiter in the Army Reserve, might well also be its most youthful. "This isn't work; it's a labor of love," says Moran, a beloved figure at Fort Meade who is embarking on his 60th year of doing what he loves most: finding prospects for the Army, then putting his cheerful personality to work guiding their careers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
None are so old, Thoreau once wrote, as those who have outlived their enthusiasms. By that standard, Sgt. Maj. Raymond Moran, the most chronologically advanced recruiter in the Army Reserve, might well also be its most youthful. "This isn't work; it's a labor of love," says Moran, a beloved figure at Fort Meade who is embarking on his 60th year of doing what he loves most: finding prospects for the Army, then putting his cheerful personality to work guiding their careers. Moran, who turned 80 last November, never guessed it would last this long.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.