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The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
The seventh annual Sticks for Soldiers lacrosse tournament in Fairfield, Conn., has named U.S. Army Capt. Gregory Galeazzi, a 2007 graduate of Loyola's Army ROTC program, to be the second honoree for this year's support. The Thanksgiving weekend tournament raises funds and awareness for severely wounded military personnel. He joins U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. (ret.) Greg Caron of Ellington, Conn., as honorees this year. On May 26, 2011, Galeazzi, an Army Ranger, was seriously wounded while conducting a dismounted patrol in Afghanistan's Kandahar province.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 30, 2000
WASHINGTON - One of the things you learn quickly in the military is to never, ever rile a U.S. Army Ranger, as foes have learned the hard way from Normandy to the Middle East. Yet the new Army chief of staff, Gen. Eric Shinseki, has managed to rile battalions of them in a single swoop, issuing an order that will make the elite commando force's cherished black beret the ordinary headgear for every soldier in the Army, including members of the National Guard and Reserves. The Rangers, famed for their "extreme prejudice" form of combat and ability to survive by eating rats, snakes and insects, are not taking the order lightly.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Come Monday, Duke's Casey Carroll hopes to play the game he loves while saluting the sacrifices he and others have made for their country. When better than Memorial Day for a former Army Ranger to end his college lacrosse career in the NCAA championship game? "That [scenario] would be great for so many reasons - but, of course, it's one game at a time," said Carroll, 29, a starting defenseman for the top-seeded Blue Devils, who play No. 5 Denver in the Division I semifinals at 1 p.m. Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium.
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By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 2001
FORT BENNING, Ga. -- The young soldier clings to the rope, looking miserable. His face is one big contortion, and his shaved head glistens with sweat in the chill morning air. The Tough One -- one of 26 obstacles on a grueling course in the middle of nowhere -- has lived up to its name. The sleep-deprived and hungry soldier is gamely trying for a third time to inch up the rope. "Go, Ranger!" the instructor yells. "What are you waiting for? Christmas?" Another instructor chides the GI in a mocking falsetto: "I ain't gonna make it, Sarge."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 11, 2010
Bruce Thomas Hall, a retired utilities engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of pneumonia Saturday at a Sebring, Fla., hospital. He was 88 and lived in Rodgers Forge. Bruce Thomas Hall, a retired utilities engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of pneumonia Saturday at a Sebring, Fla., hospital. He was 88 and lived in Rodgers Forge. Born in Baltimore and raised on Edgemere Avenue in Park Heights, he was the son of a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad engineer and a homemaker.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Robert W. Weinhold Sr., a decorated Army Airborne Ranger in the Vietnam War who later worked for several financial institutions, died Monday at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center of kidney failure. He was 75. The son of Herman W. Weinhold, a textile millworker, and Mary Alice Weinhold, a homemaker, Robert Winway Weinhold was born and raised in Methuen, Mass., where he graduated in 1956 from Methuen High School. He enrolled at Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., where he was captain and quarterback for the university's football team.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Come Monday, Duke's Casey Carroll hopes to play the game he loves while saluting the sacrifices he and others have made for their country. When better than Memorial Day for a former Army Ranger to end his college lacrosse career in the NCAA championship game? "That [scenario] would be great for so many reasons - but, of course, it's one game at a time," said Carroll, 29, a starting defenseman for the top-seeded Blue Devils, who play No. 5 Denver in the Division I semifinals at 1 p.m. Saturday at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
George Francis Kerchner, a highly decorated Army Ranger who on D-Day successfully led an attack on enemy gun positions that earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, died Friday at his home in Midlothian, Va., of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of a drug company manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on North Lyndhurst Avenue. He attended Polytechnic Institute until the 11th grade, when he left school to help support his family. He worked as a soda jerk for Arundel Ice Cream Co., which had been established by an uncle, and later as a security guard for the Pennsylvania Railroad.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The dispatch of 400 Army Rangers to Somalia signals a clear shift from defense to offense for the U.S. mission there.A fresh military goal of ending a simmering guerrilla conflict stirred by fugitive warlord Mohamed Farah Aidid has been added to the original job of feeding starving Somalis.Publicly, the Defense Department declared yesterday that the added troops represented no change in policy. White House officials with President Clinton, vacationing on Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
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The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Duke men's lacrosse head coach John Danowski announced Thursday that redshirt senior defenseman Casey Carroll will miss the 2013 season after undergoing surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee. The procedure was performed Monday by Dr. Claude T. Moorman III , Duke's director of sports medicine. Carroll returned to the Blue Devils for a fifth year of eligibility after serving five years as an Army Ranger. He previously played for Duke from 2004-07, earning first team All-America honors his senior season.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
The seventh annual Sticks for Soldiers lacrosse tournament in Fairfield, Conn., has named U.S. Army Capt. Gregory Galeazzi, a 2007 graduate of Loyola's Army ROTC program, to be the second honoree for this year's support. The Thanksgiving weekend tournament raises funds and awareness for severely wounded military personnel. He joins U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. (ret.) Greg Caron of Ellington, Conn., as honorees this year. On May 26, 2011, Galeazzi, an Army Ranger, was seriously wounded while conducting a dismounted patrol in Afghanistan's Kandahar province.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
George Francis Kerchner, a highly decorated Army Ranger who on D-Day successfully led an attack on enemy gun positions that earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, died Friday at his home in Midlothian, Va., of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of a drug company manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on North Lyndhurst Avenue. He attended Polytechnic Institute until the 11th grade, when he left school to help support his family. He worked as a soda jerk for Arundel Ice Cream Co., which had been established by an uncle, and later as a security guard for the Pennsylvania Railroad.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 11, 2010
Bruce Thomas Hall, a retired utilities engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of pneumonia Saturday at a Sebring, Fla., hospital. He was 88 and lived in Rodgers Forge. Bruce Thomas Hall, a retired utilities engineer and decorated World War II veteran, died of pneumonia Saturday at a Sebring, Fla., hospital. He was 88 and lived in Rodgers Forge. Born in Baltimore and raised on Edgemere Avenue in Park Heights, he was the son of a Baltimore and Ohio Railroad engineer and a homemaker.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 2001
FORT BENNING, Ga. -- The young soldier clings to the rope, looking miserable. His face is one big contortion, and his shaved head glistens with sweat in the chill morning air. The Tough One -- one of 26 obstacles on a grueling course in the middle of nowhere -- has lived up to its name. The sleep-deprived and hungry soldier is gamely trying for a third time to inch up the rope. "Go, Ranger!" the instructor yells. "What are you waiting for? Christmas?" Another instructor chides the GI in a mocking falsetto: "I ain't gonna make it, Sarge."
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 30, 2000
WASHINGTON - One of the things you learn quickly in the military is to never, ever rile a U.S. Army Ranger, as foes have learned the hard way from Normandy to the Middle East. Yet the new Army chief of staff, Gen. Eric Shinseki, has managed to rile battalions of them in a single swoop, issuing an order that will make the elite commando force's cherished black beret the ordinary headgear for every soldier in the Army, including members of the National Guard and Reserves. The Rangers, famed for their "extreme prejudice" form of combat and ability to survive by eating rats, snakes and insects, are not taking the order lightly.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 21, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Stripped to their shorts, their faces smeared with sun block, the crack commandos of the U.S. Army's 75th Ranger Regiment spent the last day of their ill-fated mission in Somalia locked in fierce combat -- on the volleyball court.Then, before the sweat dried, the first 100 quietly packed their bags, had a last look around and prepared to board a C-5 Galaxy for home today in a departure with no ceremony.Asked yesterday how long he had been in Somalia, one of the 750 Rangers due to leave under President Clinton's orders to abandon their mission simply shook his head and said, "Too long."
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1996
A suspect in a Georgia bank robbery who barricaded himself in a Southwest Baltimore house for 8 1/2 hours Friday was being held at the Central District police station without bond last night. He is scheduled for a hearing before a U.S. District judge tomorrow.Ronnie Bright, 24, an ex-Army Ranger, has been charged with robbing the First Union Bank in Norcross, Ga., on Tuesday. Mr. Bright had "trouble" with the bank in 1994, and those financial woes led to his discharge from the service, said Special Agent Jay Spadafore, an FBI spokesman in Atlanta.
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