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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Top Army officials appeared before Congress yesterday and immediately found themselves defending not only their response to a widening sex scandal but also their long-standing policy of expanding job opportunities for female soldiers.Both Democrats and Republicans expressed concerns about the perils implicit in the Army, where men and women train together and camp side by side in remote operations."I have some fundamental concerns about throwing very young women in a position with a drill sergeant," said Sen. Rick Santorum, a Pennsylvania Republican.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
Army personnel at Aberdeen Proving Ground are developing methods to detect biological weapons in response to recent threats from North Korea, including a 15-foot-high device that soldiers have dubbed "the Kraken. " North Korea has issued a series of threats in recent weeks, and U.S. officials are monitoring the Korean peninsula, from which Kim Jong-un's government could launch ballistic missiles. While the danger of missiles is more pressing, Army officials said developing better capabilities to detect biological warfare threats has also been a priority for the past six years.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Robert A. Erlandson and Tom Bowman and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Jay Apperson, JoAnna Daemmrich, Dan Thanh Dang, Ronnie Greene and Lisa Respers contributed to this article | November 9, 1996
More Army trainers -- most likely drill instructors -- are expected to be charged with sexual wrongdoing in the scandal that is enveloping an Aberdeen Proving Ground school and now includes at least 17 victims, Army officials said yesterday.Two more drill sergeants will face charges, a top Army official said, in a growing investigation that so far has led to disciplinary action against four drill sergeants and one captain.Charges already filed range from improper relationships with a subordinate to obstruction of justice and rape -- though it was not clear how many alleged rapes were included among the complaints.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegis | December 11, 2012
Concerns about cutbacks in defense spending notwithstanding, there are plenty of business opportunities on the horizon connected to activities at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Last week, more than 1,100 business and economic development representatives from across the country attended the proving ground's first installation-wide Advanced Planning Briefing for Industry, where APG commands presented more than 180 potential contracts worth an estimated $19.5 billion over the next five years.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - The nation's largest warrior society, the Army, is desperately seeking men of peace like Joe Angotti Jr. The 36-year-old Roman Catholic priest from a small Indiana parish is training to become a member of the Army's chaplain corps, which is struggling with the lowest number of Catholic chaplains since World War II. "It's something I wanted to do, not because I'm an Army type of person," said Angotti, who will attain the rank of captain after...
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A retired Army general has been charged with having sex with the wives of four subordinate officers, lying about it and obstructing justice by telling one of the women he would testify against her in a child custody suit if she revealed their affair, Army officials said yesterday.Maj. Gen. David R. E. Hale, 53, who retired amid the allegations in February as the Army's deputy inspector general, now faces the military's equivalent of a grand jury. He could become the first senior military officer in more than 40 years to be called back from retirement for a court-martial.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
Despite repeated assurances that all deadly chemical warfare agents were removed 10 years ago from a now-closed research laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Army officials last week acknowledged two recent, unexpected discoveries at the building: a container of lethal nerve agent and about 1,000 gallons of toxic sludge.Army officials, who had not publicly discussed the discoveries, acknowledged the finds after The Sun learned about them from proving ground sources.After the discoveries, which came during an effort to prepare the lab for eventual demolition, the nerve agent was diluted and put into storage at the proving ground and the sludge was shipped to a disposal site outside of the state, the Army said.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
Army officials have begun monitoring wells at more than 30 homes near Fort Detrick in Frederick, looking for traces of a dye that will determine the flow of ground water from the post.The study is part of a $3.3 million investigation of chemical contamination at the 1,200-acre facility and elsewhere. Army officials initially believed a trench, where acids, solvents and chemicals were buried decades ago, was the source of pollution. However, various tests have been inconclusive.By injecting dyes in Area B, the site of the trench, the Army hopes to determine ground water flow patterns in limestone bedrock beneath that section of the post in northwest Frederick.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 20, 1994
FREDERICK -- The Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $3.3 million contract to a Pennsylvania firm to further investigate chemical contamination at Fort Detrick and to find the best way to clean it up.The yearlong project by E.R.M., an Exeter, Pa., environmental consulting firm, will include installation of monitoring wells at varying depths to determine water quality, said Norm Covert, a base spokesman.In addition, the firm will obtain soil samples at varying depths for analysis. Testing will be conducted at sites on the 800-acre Area A, which houses the main post, and Area B, a 400-acre tract off Shookstown Road, and on residential wells outside the facility.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
After extensive testing on a 60-year-old trash dump discovered next to an elementary school on Fort Meade, Army officials said yesterday the land does not appear to be contaminated by hazardous waste. Environmental officials had concerns about the half-acre dump, which construction workers from Picerne Real Estate Group discovered in February, because petroleum covered some of the household trash that was dumped there. Picerne, a Rhode Island company that is building about 3,000 homes at Fort Meade under a 50-year, $3 billion contract, was planning to put a few houses on the dump site.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2011
Calvin and Kenneth Bayne stood silently among Army officers, watching their brother's remains transferred from a plane to a waiting hearse. Kenneth kept his hand on his heart. Calvin saluted and then walked directly to the flag-draped casket and kissed it. The somber ceremony on a tarmac at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport offered the two men the first tangible contact with their older brother in more than 66 years. Pfc. Robert B. Bayne went missing in action in 1945 as he fought along the Rhine River near Mannheim, Germany.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Jia-Rui Chong and Julian E. Barnes and Jia-Rui Chong,Tribune Washington Bureau and the Los Angeles Times | January 30, 2009
WASHINGTON - The suicide rate among Army soldiers reached its highest level in three decades in 2008, military officials said yesterday in a report that pointed to the inadequacy of anti-suicide efforts undertaken in recent years. At least 128 soldiers took their own lives last year, representing an estimated suicide rate of 20.2 per 100,000, a sharp increase from the 2007 rate of 16.8. It marked the first time the Army rate has exceeded the national suicide rate for the corresponding population group - 19.5 per 100,000 - since the Pentagon began systematically tracking suicides nearly 30 years ago. The 2008 figure does not include 15 additional deaths under investigation that officials suspect were suicides.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
The state attorney general has filed a lawsuit in federal court against the Army, alleging that the military branch has failed to abide by a cleanup order for groundwater and soil contamination at Fort Meade. Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler filed in August a notice of intent to sue the Army if the site was not cleaned up within 90 days. The lawsuit alleges that the Army did not enforce an Environmental Protection Agency order to perform specific actions and produce a timeline for cleanup.
NEWS
February 8, 2007
Army withdraws Ft. Meade sewage incinerator plan Facing a groundswell of opposition, Army officials announced last night that they are withdrawing plans to build a sewage sludge incinerator at Fort Meade. "It's Fort Meade's intention to terminate the project because it no longer makes good business sense," said Clyde Reynolds, public works director at the Army post. Fort Meade issued a news release stating its intention at a public hearing on the project held by the Maryland Department of the Environment.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN and TOM BOWMAN,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Pentagon officials are considering cutting as many as 34,000 soldiers -- the bulk of them from the National Guard -- at a time when U.S. ground forces are stretched in Iraq, according to defense officials. The proposed cuts are part of a reduction in the growth of defense spending over the next five years ordered by the White House. The manpower cuts stem from a decision by top Army leaders to sacrifice troop strength in order to provide money for new weapons systems and other equipment, said defense officials, who requested anonymity.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Faced with a need to expand the Army and ease recruitment problems, Army officials have decided to loosen the requirements for junior officer candidates - accepting prospects who exceed the current age limit by more than a decade, and permitting more flexibility to waive their minor criminal or civil offenses, according to a memo obtained by The Sun. The May 25 memo, sent to division commanders and other generals, said the Army hopes to...
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1995
FREDERICK -- Preliminary analyses of soil from test trenches in a Fort Detrick landfill thought to be the main source of toxins tainting nearby wells reveal no traces of the expected chemicals, Army officials say.During recent excavation of Pit 11, a trench where acids, solvents and chemicals likely were buried decades ago, Army and state officials were puzzled to find only normal refuse -- household waste, newspapers, burned timbers and soda cans.They...
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
Army officials have unveiled a plan to reduce environmental threats from a chemical weapons burning site at Aberdeen Proving Ground by excavating "hot spots" of contamination and covering the area with dirt.The proposal, which has the tentative backing of state environmental officials, seeks to reduce the effects of heavy metals contamination at the tip of the proving ground's Edgewood Area peninsula.A blanket of soil at least two feet deep would be spread over nine acres of the "burn pits" area on a site known as J Field.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 16, 2005
WASHINGTON - At least 26 prisoners have died in U.S. custody in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2002 in what Army and Navy investigators have concluded or suspect were acts of criminal homicide, according to military officials. The number of confirmed or suspected cases is much higher than any accounting the military has previously reported. A Pentagon report sent to Congress last week cited only six prisoner deaths caused by abuse, but that partial tally was limited to what the author, Vice Adm. Albert T. Church III of the Navy, called "closed, substantiated abuse cases" as of September.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Army is so short of new recruits that for first time in nearly five years it failed in February to fill its monthly quota of volunteers sent to boot camp. Army officials called it the latest ominous sign of the Iraq war's impact on the military's ability to enlist fresh troops. "We're very concerned about it," Army Secretary Francis J. Harvey told the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday when asked about recruiting shortfalls in the active-duty Army and Army Reserve.
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