Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArmy Nurse
IN THE NEWS

Army Nurse

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 5, 2004
Katherine Irby Burton, a former Army nurse and avid gardener, died June 28 of natural causes at her home on Gibson Island. She was 88. Born Katherine Irby in Charlotte Courthouse, Va., she grew up in Altavista, Va., and graduated from the former Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing in Roanoke, Va., in 1938. She moved to Baltimore to train at Johns Hopkins Hospital and then joined the Army. During her service in the Philippines and Australia, she met and married Dr. Wilbur D. Burton Jr., a dental surgeon in her hospital unit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Virginia L. Evans, a former Army nurse who while serving in Europe during World War II cared for Gen. George S. Patton Jr., died Sept. 24 at Hope Hospice in Coral Gables, Fla., of renal failure. She was 98. The daughter of Leonard Schmidt, a tailor, and Ascensia Schmidt, the former Virginia Lucille Schmidt was born and raised in Indianapolis, where she graduated from public schools. Mrs. Evans was a 1938 graduate of St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing in Indianapolis, where she earned her nursing degree.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2002
Zourie H.W. Clark, a former Army nurse who turned her military health training into a lifelong calling, died of cancer at her home in Queenstown on Wednesday. The one-time resident of Baltimore and Severna Park was 79. Known to friends as "Dolly," Zourie Wentz was born and raised in East Baltimore before she moved with her family to the Ten Hills section of the city as a teen-ager and graduated from Friends School on Charles Street in 1941. She attended Randolph-Macon Woman's College in Lynchburg, Va., but cut her education short at the outbreak of World War II to enlist in the Army, serving as a nurse at Camp Lee, Va. It was to be the beginning of a long affiliation with the craft of care-giving.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Ann Miller, who was a nurse with the Army Nurse Corps during World War II and later founded the Maryland Food Bank, died Wednesday of respiratory failure at Vantage House in Columbia. She was 97. "Many people may not know that the Maryland Food Bank was the first food bank on the East Coast and one of the first nationwide - all thanks to Ann Miller's visionary leadership and hard work," said Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank. "She served on the very first board of America's Second Harvest, which has since become Feeding America, the largest anti-hunger charity in the nation," said Ms. Flateman.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | August 18, 2006
Savannah G. "Penny" Vernarelli, a registered nurse who served in the Army in World War II and Korea, died of lung cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Hamilton resident was 85. She was born Savannah Georgia Swaim and raised in Ironto, Va., and graduated from high school in Roanoke, Va. "People think she was named for Savannah, Georgia, but she wasn't. Her father, a Norfolk and Western Railway conductor, gave her the nickname of Penny because she was so small," said a son, Mark A. Vernarelli of Baldwin, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services and former television news reporter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Elizabeth G. Kirkpatrick, a homemaker who had been an Army nurse during World War II, died Oct. 29 from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 91. The daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, Elizabeth Reily Gross was born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa., where she graduated from the Seiler School. A boarding student, she graduated in 1939 from St. Timothy's School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from Bryn Mawr College.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | February 5, 1991
Although she is no longer in active military duty, "my heart is in the Army Nurse Corps," said Mari Pohlhaus, and her thoughts since the gulf war began have focused on how to help fellow nurses serving there.An important resource that medical personnel in war situations lack is a library, reasoned Ms. Pohlhaus, now a graduate student in nursing at Catholic University. In normal situations, "if we encounter a problem, we run down to the library and read up on it. But you don't have libraries in evacuation hospitals."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2000
Agnes Sweeney never thought she would be given a hero's reception -- not when she volunteered to become an Army nurse, not even after she helped save countless soldiers' lives while bombs exploded so close that she could see them. And certainly not now, at age 84, long after her service through World War II and Korea. She was assigned to field hospitals in Africa, Italy, France and Germany during World War II, and marched with soldiers liberating German concentration camps. Yesterday, the Severn woman stood in an auditorium at Fort Meade, being pinned with 10 distinguished and meritorious service medals, including the Bronze Star, and receiving praise for deeds of long ago. "It's such a strange feeling," she said before the ceremony.
NEWS
February 10, 2007
Etta L. Ryden, a retired Army nurse who served in three wars, died of heart failure Feb. 3 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. The former Frederick resident was 92. She was born and raised in Rochester, N.Y., and moved with her family to Catonsville in the 1930s. She attended the University of Iowa and graduated from Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y., with a certified nursing degree in 1942. She earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from the Johns Hopkins University in 1949.
NEWS
April 20, 2007
Dr. Frances W. Reeder, a retired psychiatrist who had been a nurse during World War II, died in her sleep Tuesday at a Tallahassee, Fla., retirement community. The former Pasadena resident was 93. Frances Seward Anderson was born and raised in Lynchburg, Va. She earned a bachelor's degree from Duke University in 1935 and a nursing degree from the University of Virginia School of Nursing in 1937. She was married in 1937 to Robert H. Williams, who became a Navy surgeon, and they were stationed at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Elizabeth G. Kirkpatrick, a homemaker who had been an Army nurse during World War II, died Oct. 29 from complications of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The longtime Ruxton resident was 91. The daughter of a career Army officer and a homemaker, Elizabeth Reily Gross was born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa., where she graduated from the Seiler School. A boarding student, she graduated in 1939 from St. Timothy's School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from Bryn Mawr College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Myrtle M. Watson, an Army nurse whose indelible memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor remained with her for the rest of her life, died Feb. 11 of vascular disease at Oak Crest Village. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 98. Early in the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Mrs. Watson was busy working her first solo weekend assignment in the orthopedic ward at Schofield Hospital near Pearl Harbor, which was short-staffed because it was a weekend. She began pushing bedridden men out to a second-story lanai so they could take in a barefoot inter-regimental football game that was to be played on the hospital lawn.
NEWS
By Yamiche Alcindor and The Washington Post | November 24, 2009
Lt. Col. Juanita Warman had been at Fort Hood only 24 hours, preparing for deployment to Iraq, when she and 12 others were gunned down there earlier this month. She was the highest-ranking soldier killed in the attack. "I kept thinking, 'She can't be in the processing center.' She had just gotten there, she had more training to undergo. She was not due to leave until the end of November," her husband, Philip Warman, told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. "I knew she was going in harm's way in Iraq.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 9, 2009
Lt. Col. Juanita L. Warman arrived at Fort Hood less than 24 hours before a gunman opened fire. In the hours that followed, relatives tried to assure Warman's mother, Eva Waddle, that she was likely safe. "I said, 'Mom, it's fine,' " said Warman's sister, Tammy Harper of Pittsburgh. "'There's 51,000 people there [at the base]. There's no way.' " When the phone rang shortly after 10 that night, Harper figured it was her mother calling to say she'd finally gotten word from Warman.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2007
An Army nurse who spent 16 years tending to soldiers and volunteered to serve in Iraq was remembered for her infectious smile and self-sacrifice in a memorial ceremony yesterday at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Family members, friends and colleagues filled the Main Post Chapel to remember Capt. Maria Ines Ortiz, 40, who was killed on July 10 in a mortar attack in the Green Zone of Baghdad. She was the first Army nurse to die in combat since the Vietnam War, military officials said. Before leaving for Iraq in September last year, Captain Ortiz served as the chief nurse of general medicine at the Kirk U.S. Army Health Clinic at the proving ground for a year and a half.
NEWS
April 20, 2007
Dr. Frances W. Reeder, a retired psychiatrist who had been a nurse during World War II, died in her sleep Tuesday at a Tallahassee, Fla., retirement community. The former Pasadena resident was 93. Frances Seward Anderson was born and raised in Lynchburg, Va. She earned a bachelor's degree from Duke University in 1935 and a nursing degree from the University of Virginia School of Nursing in 1937. She was married in 1937 to Robert H. Williams, who became a Navy surgeon, and they were stationed at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.
FEATURES
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Dressed sharply in her green Army uniform, Bonnita Wilson charged through life. A wife and mother of three, she slept only four or five hours a night, pumped 65 push-ups in two minutes and earned early promotions. She was a fast-rising star in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. So when Major Wilson was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer just before she was to start graduate work at the University of Maryland School of Nursing two years ago, she did the only thing she knew how: She kept going and doing her best.
NEWS
January 31, 2006
Ina E. Fisher, a World War II Army nurse who became a Baltimore County public school nurse, died of heart failure Jan. 23 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Timonium resident was 83. Born Ina Elizabeth Frankenfield in Towson, she was a 1940 graduate of Towson High School. After earning her nursing degree in 1943 from Maryland General Hospital, Mrs. Fisher enlisted in the Army Nurse Corps and was sent to Plymouth, England. At the time of the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944, she was assigned to a hospital in Bristol, England, that treated casualties evacuated from the landing, especially paratroopers and glider crews.
NEWS
February 10, 2007
Etta L. Ryden, a retired Army nurse who served in three wars, died of heart failure Feb. 3 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. The former Frederick resident was 92. She was born and raised in Rochester, N.Y., and moved with her family to Catonsville in the 1930s. She attended the University of Iowa and graduated from Highland Hospital in Rochester, N.Y., with a certified nursing degree in 1942. She earned a bachelor's degree in nursing from the Johns Hopkins University in 1949.
NEWS
December 29, 2006
Dorothy Newberger, a retired nurse who served in World War II combat areas, died of multiple organ failure Monday at the Baltimore VA Rehabilitation & Extended Care Center. The Woodlawn resident was 87. Born Dorothy Loretta Sarsitis in Baltimore Highlands, she was a 1935 graduate of Catonsville High School and earned a degree at the old St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing. Family members said that in 1943, to the dismay of her parents, she enlisted and was accepted in the Army Nurse Corps.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.