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By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | April 28, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When they disguised themselves as soldiers and executed a daring commando-style raid on the enemy stronghold, 17 Naval Academy seniors risked their careers -- and perhaps even jail -- to make their mark in the Class of '92.They assured their place in academy lore as the fabled guys who stole the mules.These weren't just any mules. They were the four Army mascots, and the foray, slashing like a cutlass into the heart of West Point, was on the eve of the 101st Army-Navy game.The Army reacted furiously, launching an interstate manhunt that ended that night at the Naval Academy gates, where Defense Department security agents ambushed the mule-nappers and tried to take the animals back to West Point.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
PHILADELPHIA - Navy freshman cornerback Brendon Clements had gained plenty of on-field experience going into his first Army-Navy game, having started for much of his first year in Annapolis. Yet when Clements woke up Saturday morning at the team's hotel, he was more nervous than he had ever been for a college game. The feeling didn't go away after he went to breakfast, nor did it after he a pregame meeting. “I told some of the other players I haven't been nervous all year and I'm nervous now, and we haven't even left for the game yet,” Clements recalled a few hours later.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
It's a fitful dream, one that has haunted Dick Nowak for 50 years. In it, Army's football team has the ball on Navy's 2-yard line. Trailing by six points, Nowak and the Cadets line up to run a final play as precious seconds tick away. And then? Time runs out - and Nowak wakes up. “The ending is always the same,” he said resignedly. “We never get the play off.” The dream is all too real. In 1963, that's how Army lost to Navy, 21-15, in a game deeply etched in the lore of their 144-year rivalry.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Quarterbacks Trent Steelman and Keenan Reynolds will come into Saturday's Army-Navy game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia from nearly opposite directions. The 113th meeting between the service academies will be Steelman's last game in a collegiate career in which he set Army records for rushing touchdowns (44) and consecutive starts (32), but led the Black Knights to only one winning season (7-6 in 2010). It will mark the seventh career start for Reynolds. The first Navy quarterback to start a game as a freshman in more than two decades, Reynolds has accounted for 17 touchdowns (eight passing)
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Rarely, if ever, will a game between a team with a modest 7-4 record and its 2-9 opponent be as meaningful as the one scheduled to play here at Lincoln Financial Field on Dec. 8. Then again, this year's meeting between Navy and Army has more at stake than usual. It marks the first time since 2005 that the Commander in Chief's Trophy — given to the winner of the round robin played out among the nation's service academies — will be handed to the team that emerges victorious from this iconic rivalry.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
It's a fitful dream, one that has haunted Dick Nowak for 50 years. In it, Army's football team has the ball on Navy's 2-yard line. Trailing by six points, Nowak and the Cadets line up to run a final play as precious seconds tick away. And then? Time runs out - and Nowak wakes up. “The ending is always the same,” he said resignedly. “We never get the play off.” The dream is all too real. In 1963, that's how Army lost to Navy, 21-15, in a game deeply etched in the lore of their 144-year rivalry.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | May 30, 1992
An article in yesterday's Sun gave an incorrect date for the 1992 Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia. The game will be Dec. 5.The Sun regrets the error.The 1993 Army-Navy football game has been moved from Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium to Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., the two service academies announced yesterday.The 1993 game will be played Dec. 4 and mark the second time it has been played at the Meadowlands. In 1989 at Giants Stadium, Navy defeated Army, 19-17, on a 32-yard field goal by Frank Schenk with 11 seconds left.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | May 21, 2009
M&T Bank Stadium is expected to host at least one Army-Navy football game - and perhaps more - as the schools seek sites for future games, according to officials familiar with the process. The committee of representatives from the Naval Academy and West Point could announce sites for games after 2009 by week's end, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because selections have not been finalized. Baltimore had previously learned it was among four finalists, competing with Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field - which will host this year's game - as well as FedEx Field in Landover and the new Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J. The committee is examining bids for games from 2010 to 2014.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | November 24, 1993
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- When Naval Academy athletic director Jack Lengyel innocently forgot to introduce football coach George Chaump yesterday at a press luncheon for the Dec. 4 Army-Navy game at Giants Stadium, Chaump said jokingly, "I hope this isn't an omen."Chaump was only half-kidding. His future in Annapolis could hinge on beating Army, the last game on his four-year contract. His record going into the game is 11-32."I put pressure on myself to win every game," Chaump said, "but you especially want to win in a year your contract expires.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | December 4, 2013
It happened in the first quarter of Navy's wild overtime victory over San Jose State two Saturdays ago. It happened in the last regular season game before the Midshipmen get to play in their version of the Super Bowl , next week's 114th Army-Navy Game. It's something that happens just about every week somewhere in the football world, but it shouldn't have happened to this kid. Senior wide receiver Matt Aiken pulled in 10-yard pass and felt a shoulder pad crash into his left leg. He knew right away that something was wrong, because he already knew way too much about what football can do to the inside of a healthy knee.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
It has been likened to a mini-Army-Navy game, or sometimes the Hatfields versus the McCoys. From the start, though, City-Poly was about more than just football. More than a century ago, the budding rivalry was so intense that the schools held secret practices and excused players from classes days before the game to work themselves into a frenzy. Through the years, the annual meeting has been marked - and occasionally marred - by pregame hijinks, from mascot thefts and graffiti wars to impromptu rallies by thousands of students that gridlocked Baltimore streets and mushroomed into full-scale donnybrooks.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
The football game between Navy and Air Force in Annapolis will be played as scheduled despite the continuing shutdown of the U.S. government, Naval Academy athletic director Chet Gladchuk said Wednesday night. “The secretary of defense has authorized the game to move forward with the condition that there will be no [government-] appropriated funding expended,” Gladchuk said. Gladchuk said he was “relieved and appreciative.” “It's been a lengthy and very intense few days with the exchange of information, but that's what we do for a living,” said Gladchuk, who has been the athletic director at Navy since 2001.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Quarterbacks Trent Steelman and Keenan Reynolds will come into Saturday's Army-Navy game at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia from nearly opposite directions. The 113th meeting between the service academies will be Steelman's last game in a collegiate career in which he set Army records for rushing touchdowns (44) and consecutive starts (32), but led the Black Knights to only one winning season (7-6 in 2010). It will mark the seventh career start for Reynolds. The first Navy quarterback to start a game as a freshman in more than two decades, Reynolds has accounted for 17 touchdowns (eight passing)
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Rarely, if ever, will a game between a team with a modest 7-4 record and its 2-9 opponent be as meaningful as the one scheduled to play here at Lincoln Financial Field on Dec. 8. Then again, this year's meeting between Navy and Army has more at stake than usual. It marks the first time since 2005 that the Commander in Chief's Trophy — given to the winner of the round robin played out among the nation's service academies — will be handed to the team that emerges victorious from this iconic rivalry.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2000
I HOPE Baltimore gets the Army-Navy game back again because, in my 24 years in the Queen City of the Patapsco Drainage Basin, few events reached the heights this one did for grandeur, good feeling and civic pride - and I'm including the papal visit in 1995, the World Series in 1983 and the Elvis concert in 1977. There are days - too many days - when a Baltimorean can get thoroughly depressed by the grind of human issues in our midst: the poverty, the drug addiction, the lead-paint poisoning, the declining population, the sense that nothing good can stay in this town under the weight of our heavy social problems.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | December 1, 2007
In an article in yesterday's Sun, sports columnist Rick Maese recounted the age-old Army-Navy game tradition of West Point cadets slipping into Annapolis to capture a couple of the Naval Academy's mascot goats. Today's Army-Navy clash at M&T Bank Stadium will be the fifth time the two military academies have played the game locally. The first time was 1893, when they met in Annapolis, with Navy winning, 6-4. Thirty-one years later, when they took to the field at the old Municipal Stadium on 33rd Street in Baltimore; this time, Army trounced Navy, 12-0.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Duty, service and honor are big words. They are also ones that are often abused these days by Washington politicians who thank each other for their "service" even as they sink deeper into partisan gridlock. "Game of Honor," a documentary about West Point and Annapolis and the Army-Navy football game played Dec. 10 in Landover, reminds viewers of the higher meanings of those words. The two-hour film premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on Showtime. Producers Pete Radovich and Steve Karasik say they didn't set out with any such lofty goal in mind for their Showtime-CBS Sports co-production, which was shot during the past eight months in the barracks and on the playing fields at the U.S. military and naval academies.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff report | December 10, 2011
Whether it's playing pickup basketball games at the White House, watching college basketball on an aircraft carrier or seeing his brother-in-law's Oregon State Beavers take on Towson University, it's clear President Obama loves sports. It was even more impressive the way he jumped out of his seat and helped honor the Towson football team at halftime of the game. The pictures were great. It probably drove the Secret Service guys crazy. More than a few earpieces were squawking when he did that.
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