Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArmy Navy
IN THE NEWS

Army Navy

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
Ken Niumatalolo noticed the Army guys looking askance as he wound his way through the Pentagon to attend a ceremony for his brother, an Army lieutenant colonel. "I think they recognized me," said the Navy football coach, chuckling. "And I don't think they were too happy to see me. " The Army-Navy football rivalry - set to be contested for the 113 t h time Saturday in Philadelphia - is felt from the halls of power in Washington to the waters and battlefields of the Middle East.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | February 24, 2014
The Army-Navy rivalry is coming to women's lacrosse. Beginning with the 2016 season, the United States Military Academy will field its first varsity women's lacrosse team. The Black Knights will play in the Patriot League with Navy and Loyola. Just as Navy did, Army will turn its successful club team into a varsity program over a two-year period. The Midshipmen are in their seventh season as a varsity program and have won the Patriot League championship the last four years. "Navy is very excited about the future rivarly," Mids coach Cindy Timchal said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 11, 2014
It has been four weeks since Navy added to its string of victories over Army in college football's most venerated rivalry, but the amicable athletic animosity between the nation's two oldest service academies does not begin and end on the gridiron. Their reciprocal mantras - "Go Navy, beat Army" and "Go Army, Beat Navy" - reverberate through their respective athletic programs all year round, and the intensity of the rivalry was very much on display for Saturday's nationally televised basketball doubleheader at Alumni Hall.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 11, 2014
It has been four weeks since Navy added to its string of victories over Army in college football's most venerated rivalry, but the amicable athletic animosity between the nation's two oldest service academies does not begin and end on the gridiron. Their reciprocal mantras - "Go Navy, beat Army" and "Go Army, Beat Navy" - reverberate through their respective athletic programs all year round, and the intensity of the rivalry was very much on display for Saturday's nationally televised basketball doubleheader at Alumni Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
This year's Army-Navy game will be the focus if a two-hour docu-drama co-produced by Showtime and CBS Sports. Showtime's cameras are spending six months in full-access, backstage coverage of the two academies and their teams in advance of the the game, according to the cable channel. The docu-drama will premiere Dec. 21 on Showtime, 10 nights after the game, which airs on CBS. A preview on the making of the docu-drama will air Nov. 23 on Showtime. Viewers can get their first look at the material on Oct. 17 when CBS.com launches a 10-part web series.
SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Ricky Dobbs paused for a moment. The former Navy quarterback was trying to explain what it meant to play against rival Army during his time at the Annapolis school. But he needed a few seconds to organize his thoughts. “Its just special,” Dobbs finally said in a telephone call Wednesday. “It's hard to put into words, but we have so much respect for our military academy brothers. But we want to beat them bad, too. There's a ton of pride on the field when Navy plays Army.” After Dobbs graduated in 2011, he never expected to compete in the historic rivalry again.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
PSINet Stadium next year will become the 14th venue to host the annual Army-Navy classic, announced formally yesterday by officials who estimate the game will bring more than $15 million into the city.The 101st renewal marks the first time the game has been played in Baltimore since 1944 when, according to Sen. Barbara Mikulski "it was linked to a war bond drive and 70,000 people came. The only bad thing that happened is that Army won."Navy athletic director Jack Lengyel placed the revenue to be gleaned "as somewhere around $15 million and up when you consider four or five days in hotels, restaurants, transportation.
NEWS
December 7, 1996
STRIP AWAY stories of $50 million contracts and drug violations from the sports sections of America's newspapers and one might think they had turned back the clock a few generations to the Golden Age of Sports: The despised Yankees win a World Series. A heavyweight boxing bout generates genuine excitement. A legion of fans trails a hot, young golf sensation (named Tiger, not Arnie). And this afternoon, Army and Navy play a football game that will recall the days when the service academies churned out heroes for the gridiron as well as the battlefield.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Whenever the Army and Navy football teams go on the road, they are normally accorded a warm and polite reception from opposing fans because of what they represent. Perhaps the only exception is at Colorado Springs, Colo., where the Air Force Academy backers mirror the haughtiness of the team that likes to toss around reminders about who monopolizes the Commander in Chief's Trophy among the three service institutions. This season - in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks - the cordiality has been especially graphic, the flag-waving never more pronounced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Duty, service and honor are big words. They are also ones that are often abused these days by Washington politicians who thank each other for their "service" even as they sink deeper into partisan gridlock. "Game of Honor," a documentary about West Point and Annapolis and the Army-Navy football game played Dec. 10 in Landover, reminds viewers of the higher meanings of those words. The two-hour film premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday on Showtime. Producers Pete Radovich and Steve Karasik say they didn't set out with any such lofty goal in mind for their Showtime-CBS Sports co-production, which was shot during the past eight months in the barracks and on the playing fields at the U.S. military and naval academies.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
PHILADELPHIA - Navy freshman cornerback Brendon Clements had gained plenty of on-field experience going into his first Army-Navy game, having started for much of his first year in Annapolis. Yet when Clements woke up Saturday morning at the team's hotel, he was more nervous than he had ever been for a college game. The feeling didn't go away after he went to breakfast, nor did it after he a pregame meeting. “I told some of the other players I haven't been nervous all year and I'm nervous now, and we haven't even left for the game yet,” Clements recalled a few hours later.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2013
It's a fitful dream, one that has haunted Dick Nowak for 50 years. In it, Army's football team has the ball on Navy's 2-yard line. Trailing by six points, Nowak and the Cadets line up to run a final play as precious seconds tick away. And then? Time runs out - and Nowak wakes up. “The ending is always the same,” he said resignedly. “We never get the play off.” The dream is all too real. In 1963, that's how Army lost to Navy, 21-15, in a game deeply etched in the lore of their 144-year rivalry.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Boo Corrigan is torn. His parents Gene and Lena were born and raised in Baltimore, and the younger Corrigan started a sports marketing company in the city. But as the athletic director for the United States Military Academy, Corrigan is understandably wary about the Army-Navy football game returning to Charm City for 2014 and 2016. "I feel most for our cadets who have to get up that morning and take an eight-hour bus ride down," Corrigan said. "They're leaving in the military term of oh-dark-thirty to get down to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
The lives and careers of Navy football coach Ken Niumatalolo and Army coach Rich Ellerson have crossed many times over nearly three decades, starting when Niumatalolo was a two-sport high school athlete outside Honolulu and Ellerson recruited him to play quarterback at Hawaii. Ellerson brought Niumatalolo and two more highly acclaimed players, Thor Salanoa and Brian Norwood, from Radford High to play for the Rainbows. Salanoa was Niumatalo's cousin and Norwood, now the associate head coach at Baylor, was one of his best friends.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Even before last Friday's rivalry game with Patriot League opponent Army, the Navy women's soccer team had already clinched its eighth conference title, the No. 1 seed in the upcoming league tournament and the right to host Friday's semifinals and Sunday's final. Still, the 2-0 loss to the Black Knights (8-7-3 overall and 4-3-2 in the Patriot League) gnaws at the Midshipmen (15-4-0, 8-1-0) and coach Carin Gabarra. “We're happy to win and host, but at the same time, every game's a game, and that's a big game for us because it is Army-Navy,” she said Monday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Aaron Kasinitz and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Ricky Dobbs paused for a moment. The former Navy quarterback was trying to explain what it meant to play against rival Army during his time at the Annapolis school. But he needed a few seconds to organize his thoughts. “Its just special,” Dobbs finally said in a telephone call Wednesday. “It's hard to put into words, but we have so much respect for our military academy brothers. But we want to beat them bad, too. There's a ton of pride on the field when Navy plays Army.” After Dobbs graduated in 2011, he never expected to compete in the historic rivalry again.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2000
The 101st Army-Navy football game delivered everything you might expect from two teams that came into yesterday's tradition-bound matchup with a combined 1-19 record. There were seven turnovers, a couple of blocked kicks and more odd twists and turns than a Florida election. But Navy's 30-28 victory at jam-packed PSINet Stadium still lived up to the storied history that has made this annual meeting of the nation's two oldest service academies one of college football's greatest rivalries.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2000
For the first time in 56 years, the drama, color, pageantry and sheer competitive passion of the annual Army-Navy game will be staged in Baltimore today. The 101st renewal of this storied battle is set for noon at PSINet Stadium, with conditions entirely different from the last local showdown when, in 1944, the service academies were the top two ranked collegiate teams in the country. Having fallen on much leaner times, Army and Navy will bring a combined 1-19 record into this meeting, with the Midshipmen (0-10)
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2012
During Kelly Coppedge's final conversation with her grandfather last Sunday, she says he was still thinking about Navy's football team. "He asked, 'When's Navy playing and who are they playing?" Kelly Coppedge recalled Thursday. J.O. "Bo" Coppedge, a former Navy football player and wrestler who ran Navy's athletic department from 1968 until his retirement in 1988, died Wednesday night - less than three days before the Midshipmen were scheduled to play Arizona State in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl in San Francisco.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun staff | December 13, 2012
Navy's game against Notre Dame on Nov. 1 2014 will be played at FedEx Field in Landover, the school announced today. The Midshipmen and Fighting Irish last met at Fed Ex Field in 1998. Navy's last game at the Washington Redskins' stadium was the 2011 Army-Navy game - a 27-21 victory for the Mids. “FedEx Field did a fine job of hosting the Army-Navy game and we are looking forward to another sold out event in 2014,” Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk said in a news release.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.