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NEWS
June 28, 2008
CHARLES DRYDEN, 87 Pioneering black pilot Lt. Col. Charles "Chuck" Dryden, one of the first of the pioneering black World War II pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen, died Tuesday in Atlanta of natural causes, said a spokesman for the National Museum of Patriotism in Atlanta. Colonel Dryden was on the museum's board of directors. His 21-year military career included combat missions in Korea and assignments in Japan, Germany and U.S. bases. He retired from the Air Force in 1962. Colonel Dryden was selected for aviation cadet training as part of a segregated Army Air Corps unit at Tuskegee Army Flying School in Alabama in August 1941.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Vernon J. Holloway, who spent nearly 47 years as an independent newspaper carrier coursing through the back roads of northern Baltimore County delivering The Baltimore Sun and the News American to readers, died June 12 from respiratory failure at York Hospital in York, Pa. The Parkton resident was 90. The son of farmers, Vernon James Holloway was born and raised in Parkton, and graduated in 1940 from Sparks High School. Drafted into the Army Air Corps., even though he was blind in one eye from a childhood accident, Mr. Holloway became a military policeman.
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NEWS
April 17, 2005
John William Bennett Jr., a self-educated accountant who worked at a number of companies before starting a home-based business with his wife, died of Parkinson's disease April 10 at Forest Haven Nursing and Convalescent Home in Catonsville. The Glen Burnie resident was 87. Mr. Bennett was born in Philadelphia and raised in Annapolis, where he graduated from Annapolis High School in 1935. He worked as a bank teller before joining the Army Air Corps in 1941. As part of the 82nd Service Squadron, 29th Air Service Group, Mr. Bennett was a parachute rigger.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Bob Byrnes writes: A young lady, Anna Koliais , is trying to put together some information for the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum on Martin and his relation to the outdoors. There are bits and pieces about his hunting, fishing and conservation work in several places, but nothing that pulls it all together. Do you know of anyone she could talk to about Glenn Martin and his outdoors exploits? He moved his plant to Maryland because he was familiar with the Chesapeake Bay from hunting trips.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
Bob Byrnes writes: A young lady, Anna Koliais , is trying to put together some information for the Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum on Martin and his relation to the outdoors. There are bits and pieces about his hunting, fishing and conservation work in several places, but nothing that pulls it all together. Do you know of anyone she could talk to about Glenn Martin and his outdoors exploits? He moved his plant to Maryland because he was familiar with the Chesapeake Bay from hunting trips.
NEWS
September 4, 1997
James R. Martin,79, a former chairman of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., died Sunday in Longmeadow, Mass. He joined the Springfield-based insurance company in 1951 and was named president in 1968. Six years later, he was named chairman and served in both posts until 1984 when he retired as president. He continued as board chairman until 1987 and retired as a director in 1991.Edwin McConnell,76, the last of the "Flying McConnell Brothers," died Monday at McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas after battling leukemia and Parkinson's Disease.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
He was a 19-year-old private from Baltimore, stationed in Hawaii at the Army Air Corps' Hickam Field. Now, he is 80 and a retired officer living in Columbia, hearing noises he hasn't heard in 60 years. When pundits compare yesterday's attacks on the United States to the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor, survivor Hugh Roper says they are right in more ways than one. The weather "was unbelieveably gorgeous" that December morning in Hawaii, he says. Much like yesterday's blue skies and light breeze.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2002
Kendall S. Young, whose 29 years in the military ranged from flying bombers over Europe and North Africa during World War II to training South Vietnamese pilots during the latter years of the conflict in Southeast Asia, died Tuesday of a malignant brain tumor at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 82. Promoted to major general in the U.S. Air Force before his retirement in 1975, the Baltimore native logged more than 4,500 hours in the air. He was a perfectionist, whether protecting the American image in Europe or refinishing antique bureaus, his family said.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1997
My watch got sick, so I turned it over to the watch doctor. It was away so long I began getting used to the idea it was about finished. It's about half a century old now, maybe older.Before they called me and told me it was OK, I had prepared myself to spend the rest of my life without it -- with no watch at all, in fact. I would be a watch widower.This resolution, not lightly made, was fed by two streams of persuasion. The first was the fact that the watch, a Rolex Oyster, had belonged to my father.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The memories came to Joseph Schrock clear as the cloudless blue sky as he slowly walked around the new World War II Memorial, leaning on his wooden cane. There was his time with the horse cavalry, then the Army Air Corps, his 3 1/2 years in Europe, the journal he kept ... In mid-memory, a stranger in a business suit and high heels stopped him. "Thank you," said the woman, a Red Cross employee, extending a hand. "If it wasn't for you guys ... thank you." Schrock, an 87-year-old former Army master sergeant from Portland, Ore., nodded.
NEWS
June 28, 2008
CHARLES DRYDEN, 87 Pioneering black pilot Lt. Col. Charles "Chuck" Dryden, one of the first of the pioneering black World War II pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen, died Tuesday in Atlanta of natural causes, said a spokesman for the National Museum of Patriotism in Atlanta. Colonel Dryden was on the museum's board of directors. His 21-year military career included combat missions in Korea and assignments in Japan, Germany and U.S. bases. He retired from the Air Force in 1962. Colonel Dryden was selected for aviation cadet training as part of a segregated Army Air Corps unit at Tuskegee Army Flying School in Alabama in August 1941.
NEWS
April 17, 2005
John William Bennett Jr., a self-educated accountant who worked at a number of companies before starting a home-based business with his wife, died of Parkinson's disease April 10 at Forest Haven Nursing and Convalescent Home in Catonsville. The Glen Burnie resident was 87. Mr. Bennett was born in Philadelphia and raised in Annapolis, where he graduated from Annapolis High School in 1935. He worked as a bank teller before joining the Army Air Corps in 1941. As part of the 82nd Service Squadron, 29th Air Service Group, Mr. Bennett was a parachute rigger.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The memories came to Joseph Schrock clear as the cloudless blue sky as he slowly walked around the new World War II Memorial, leaning on his wooden cane. There was his time with the horse cavalry, then the Army Air Corps, his 3 1/2 years in Europe, the journal he kept ... In mid-memory, a stranger in a business suit and high heels stopped him. "Thank you," said the woman, a Red Cross employee, extending a hand. "If it wasn't for you guys ... thank you." Schrock, an 87-year-old former Army master sergeant from Portland, Ore., nodded.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2002
Kendall S. Young, whose 29 years in the military ranged from flying bombers over Europe and North Africa during World War II to training South Vietnamese pilots during the latter years of the conflict in Southeast Asia, died Tuesday of a malignant brain tumor at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 82. Promoted to major general in the U.S. Air Force before his retirement in 1975, the Baltimore native logged more than 4,500 hours in the air. He was a perfectionist, whether protecting the American image in Europe or refinishing antique bureaus, his family said.
FEATURES
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
He was a 19-year-old private from Baltimore, stationed in Hawaii at the Army Air Corps' Hickam Field. Now, he is 80 and a retired officer living in Columbia, hearing noises he hasn't heard in 60 years. When pundits compare yesterday's attacks on the United States to the Dec. 7, 1941, bombing of Pearl Harbor, survivor Hugh Roper says they are right in more ways than one. The weather "was unbelieveably gorgeous" that December morning in Hawaii, he says. Much like yesterday's blue skies and light breeze.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1997
My watch got sick, so I turned it over to the watch doctor. It was away so long I began getting used to the idea it was about finished. It's about half a century old now, maybe older.Before they called me and told me it was OK, I had prepared myself to spend the rest of my life without it -- with no watch at all, in fact. I would be a watch widower.This resolution, not lightly made, was fed by two streams of persuasion. The first was the fact that the watch, a Rolex Oyster, had belonged to my father.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Vernon J. Holloway, who spent nearly 47 years as an independent newspaper carrier coursing through the back roads of northern Baltimore County delivering The Baltimore Sun and the News American to readers, died June 12 from respiratory failure at York Hospital in York, Pa. The Parkton resident was 90. The son of farmers, Vernon James Holloway was born and raised in Parkton, and graduated in 1940 from Sparks High School. Drafted into the Army Air Corps., even though he was blind in one eye from a childhood accident, Mr. Holloway became a military policeman.
NEWS
March 23, 2006
On March 21, 2006, JOHN H. OTTO Jr., 84 years old, died in Ft. Myers, FL. He was born June 4, 1921 in Baltimore, MD. He was a WWII Veteran in the Army Air Corps. He was a builder and carpenter, retired in 1973. He is survived by his sons, John H. Otto, III, and Walter F. Huffman and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral proceedings will be held in Ft. Myers, FL.
NEWS
September 4, 1997
James R. Martin,79, a former chairman of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co., died Sunday in Longmeadow, Mass. He joined the Springfield-based insurance company in 1951 and was named president in 1968. Six years later, he was named chairman and served in both posts until 1984 when he retired as president. He continued as board chairman until 1987 and retired as a director in 1991.Edwin McConnell,76, the last of the "Flying McConnell Brothers," died Monday at McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas after battling leukemia and Parkinson's Disease.
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