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By JONATHAN POWER | July 17, 1992
London--Some of the besieged inhabitants of Sarajevo, at last receiving a measure of food and medicine, are now telling foreign journalists: Send us guns, not bread. Relief, they say, is a palliative. They need weapons to escape from the corner the Serbs and the Croats have pushed them into.For once, the great arms sellers, America, Russia, Britain, France and Germany have not rushed into the breach offering their wares. By any standard of past conflicts there has been an amazing amount of self-discipline.
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NEWS
By Rachel Stohl and Rhea Myerscough | September 11, 2007
The recent furor over U.S.-supplied weapons missing in Iraq raises the question of whose hands U.S. weapons are finding their way into in other parts of the world. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States six years ago today, the answer has been, increasingly: to human rights abusers and undemocratic regimes. Immediately after Sept. 11, 2001, the United States began recruiting partners to assist in the myriad efforts necessary to stamp out international terrorist networks. In many cases, the United States chose to partner with countries repeatedly criticized by the State Department for human rights violations, lack of democracy and even past support of terrorism.
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NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House, already under fire for proposing to renew China's favorable trade status despite meager human rights reforms, is considering renewing arms sales to win influence with Chinese leaders, a senior administration official says.The idea of renewing the sales, which were cut off after the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989, is bound to be controversial, especially since the Bush administration has criticized Beijing for selling weapons to countries such as Pakistan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 28, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is preparing to ask Congress to approve an arms sale package for Saudi Arabia and its neighbors that is expected to total $20 billion over the next decade, at a time when some U.S. officials contend that the Saudis are playing a counterproductive role in Iraq. The proposed package of advanced weaponry for Saudi Arabia, which includes satellite-guided bombs, upgrades for its fighter planes and new naval vessels, has made Israel and some of its supporters in Congress nervous.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | November 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Outgoing U.S. Ambassador to Moscow Robert S. Strauss criticized his own government yesterday for a double standard on arms sales.He said the policy of selling arms, especially in volatile regions, can only undermine efforts to dissuade Russia from selling its own weapons abroad.His blunt comments highlighted an issue that is expected to confront the incoming Clinton administration as it struggles to balance the pressure on U.S. manufacturers created by a declining Pentagon budget against a need to control weapons sales worldwide.
NEWS
By LORA LUMPE and PAUL F. PINEO | November 28, 1993
Washington. -- Defense Secretary Les Aspin is quick to cite Third World military aggression as a key rationale for the Defense Department's $262 billion budget this year. Yet over the last 12 months the U.S. has sold a record $30 billion in weapons to Third World countries.Until now, few in Congress have dared take issue with rising U.S. arms sales for fear of being accused of undermining American jobs. Industry lobbyists routinely provide Congress with a district-by-district breakdown of the jobs tied to each sale.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Making explicit a policy that has existed in practice for three years, the Clinton administration is preparing new guidelines that will consider the health of the nation's military contractors when reviewing arms sales to foreign customers.Such sales require approval from the U.S. government, which has ruled on such deals in the past based on whether they bolster American foreign policy goals and strengthen regional alliances. Under a plan now before the president, a sale's benefit to the nation's shrinking military industry also would be considered.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - As President Bush's decision on arms sales for Taiwan drew near this month, public appeals on the subject mounted in frequency and seeming alarm from both directions. More than 80 members of Congress signed a letter urging the president to "recognize the legitimate need" for Taiwan to buy the sophisticated Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and accompanying Aegis radar system. China warned against the Aegis deal, likening it to oil splashed on a spark that could explode into the "flame of war."
NEWS
By Jim Mann | October 18, 1999
WASHINGTON -- One thing never changes in America's post-Cold War foreign policy, and that is the awesome power of the U.S. arms-exporting industries.This month, a joint House-Senate conference committee quietly approved language that could open the way once again for American arms sales to India and Pakistan -- two nations covered by U.S. sanctions as the result of their nuclear weapons programs.Never mind that the Indian subcontinent is one of the world's flash points. Never mind that India and Pakistan conducted nuclear tests last year and that they nearly went to war this year over Kashmir.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | December 14, 1990
London.SECRETARY OF STATE James Baker says that even if Iraq pulls out of Kuwait, the embargo must continue until Iraq goes along with some credible international monitoring and control of its chemical, biological and nuclear-arms industries and imposes some discipline on its acquisition of modern conventional forces.This is an important point. The only thing wrong with it is that it should apply more broadly -- that is, to more than Iraq. The arms-sales business has reeked for so long that our political nostrils no longer sniff right from wrong.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 19, 2002
ADORA, West Bank - In this hilltop settlement, the first wound was inflicted in April, when Palestinian gunmen disguised as Israeli soldiers shot to death four people in their homes. Most residents, it is safe to say, believed that was the worst that could happen to the community. The second wound came this week, when Israeli authorities charged three Adora residents and two other Israelis, all of them soldiers or army reserve officers, with selling ammunition to Palestinian militants.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 24, 2001
The $20 billion or so worth of guns, ammunition, jet fighters, tanks, missiles and other weapons that the United States sells to the world each year is roughly the same in value as U.S. automobile exports. The difference is that auto shipments are declining. Arms sales brokered by the Pentagon rose to $11.8 billion in 1999 (the latest figures available) from $10.3 billion in 1998 and $7.7 billion in 1997. That does not include billions more in weapons sold directly by U.S. makers to overseas buyers.
NEWS
April 27, 2001
PRESIDENT Bush's unfolding China policy is tough in maintaining continuity with past U.S. actions. He's retaining successful approaches that guard against changing circumstances, be it a more belligerent China or a feistier Taiwan. These policies are the right ones for this nation at this time. But they could have been enunciated more clearly and consistently. The large arms sales to Taiwan authorized by the president respond to China's alarming build-up of forces poised to attack the island.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - As President Bush's decision on arms sales for Taiwan drew near this month, public appeals on the subject mounted in frequency and seeming alarm from both directions. More than 80 members of Congress signed a letter urging the president to "recognize the legitimate need" for Taiwan to buy the sophisticated Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and accompanying Aegis radar system. China warned against the Aegis deal, likening it to oil splashed on a spark that could explode into the "flame of war."
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - The collision of a U.S. Navy spy plane and a Chinese fighter jet Sunday is the latest in a series of recent irritants between the countries, but it is not too late for diplomats on both sides to prevent the situation from developing into a major breach, foreign policy analysts said. "It's not a crisis yet," said James R. Lilley, U.S. ambassador to China during the first Bush administration. "It can be managed so it will be an issue that will disappear. But the more it goes on, the more I get concerned that it will come into a crisis."
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - Faced with a potential arms control setback, the Clinton administration threatened yesterday to slap economic sanctions on Russia in retaliation for Moscow's decision to renew the sale of tanks, nautical mines and other conventional weapons to Iran. The move came in response to a confidential dispatch sent by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov to Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright this month. In the note, Ivanov said that after Dec. 1 Moscow would no longer observe its 1995 agreement to phase out Iranian arms sales, said an administration official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
April 27, 2001
PRESIDENT Bush's unfolding China policy is tough in maintaining continuity with past U.S. actions. He's retaining successful approaches that guard against changing circumstances, be it a more belligerent China or a feistier Taiwan. These policies are the right ones for this nation at this time. But they could have been enunciated more clearly and consistently. The large arms sales to Taiwan authorized by the president respond to China's alarming build-up of forces poised to attack the island.
NEWS
By MARVIN FEUERWERGER | March 16, 1992
Washington -- The revelation that a North Korean ship bearing Scud-C missiles was able to evade American surveillance in the Persian Gulf is embarrassing to the American military. Far more significant, however, is the fact that the U.S. would not have stopped those missiles had the ship been found. As a result, North Korea and others may now believe that they are free to ship any and all arms to the Middle East with impunity.The sad truth is that there may be no effective way to prevent renegade states from subverting efforts at arms control apart from forcefully restricting the flow of arms -- a course virtually certain to bring international opprobrium.
NEWS
By Kevin McKiernan | April 28, 2000
JUNE 15 may be a record payday for Bell Textron, the Texas-based company that makes helicopter gunships. By that date, Turkey is expected to award a $4 billion contract for 145 attack helicopters, one of the largest single arms deals in history. International competition for the lucrative contract has been fierce, with five companies including Boeing Aircraft and Bell Textron submitting bids. Last month, Turkey eliminated Boeing's Apache helicopter from consideration, and now Bell's King Cobra is the odds-on favorite to win the award.
NEWS
April 21, 2000
THE LUCRATIVE business of arms sales, which accounts for a huge chunk of U.S. exports, has now captured Moscow's imagination. It is currently the world's No. 4 weapons merchant, but within the next three years hopes to bypass Britain and France and begin to move in on the United States. This aggressive sales campaign can be traced to acting Russian President Vladimir Putin, who wants to diversify exports beyond oil. In recent weeks, he has sent emissaries to weapons shows from Malaysia to Chile.
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