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NEWS
November 15, 1994
Everyone involved in U.S. foreign policy-making had better study the effects of President Clinton's order ending U.S. enforcement of the U.N.-mandated embargo in the Adriatic against arms shipments to the Bosnia-Herzegovina Republic. It is an example of misguided congressional policy-making and a sample of more likely to come.Two amendments to the defense appropriations bill in August instructed President Clinton in contradictory terms. He has followed the more moderate, proposed by Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga.
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NEWS
By Zeyno Baran | July 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - The London bombings and the anniversary of the massacre in Srebrenica, the Bosnian town where nearly 8,000 Muslim men and boys were slaughtered, were two seemingly unrelated stories that occurred within five days of each other this month. Though separated by 10 years and 1,000 miles, the two are actually rather closely linked. The war in Bosnia, particularly the arms embargo imposed on the Muslim population while the Serbs were massacring them, became the major turning point for the global Muslim consciousness.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton kept his promise to the NATO allies yesterday by vetoing legislation that calls for lifting the arms embargo on Bosnia, a move that he insists would make a bad situation worse."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Yielding to pressure from President Bush and threats of retaliation from Congress, the European Union has put off plans to lift its arms embargo on China this spring and may not press the issue until next year, U.S. and European officials said yesterday. The officials said that in addition to U.S. pressure, European nations had been shaken by the recent adoption of legislation by the Chinese National People's Congress authorizing the use of force to stop Taiwan from seceding.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Bob Dole took up his role as Senate majority leader yesterday with a two-pronged attack on the Clinton administration's foreign policy, introducing legislation to lift the arms embargo in Bosnia and to give Congress more control over the scope and financing of United Nations peacekeeping operations.The move represented the first foreign policy confrontation between the new Republican majority in Congress and the administration. And it underscored the intention of the Republican-dominated Congress in general -- and Mr. Dole in particular -- to put the administration on the defensive and try to wrest control of at least part of the foreign policy agenda.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- While keeping up his criticism of the Clinton administration's actions in Bosnia, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole is backing away from moves to force a sharp change in U.S. Balkan policy.Mr. Dole, a Republican presidential candidate, has stopped pressing for an early end to the arms embargo imposed on Bosnia's Muslim-led government, according to congressional aides. His original plan put Mr. Dole on a collision course with the Clinton administration and with the United States' European allies.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Mark Matthews and Karen Hosler and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With a margin large enough to override a threatened presidential veto, the Senate sharply repudiated President Clinton's Bosnia policy yesterday by voting to end U.S. participation in an arms embargo on that war-torn nation.The 69-29 vote reflected widespread despair over an approach that has failed to prevent the rape, torture and slaughter of Bosnian Muslims by their Serbian neighbors or even to protect the United Nations peacekeepers in the region.If Congress succeeds in lifting the embargo, it will likely trigger a sequence of events that could involve the deployment of U.S. ground troops, which have been committed by Mr. Clinton to help U.N. peacekeepers withdraw.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 4, 1994
EDGARTOWN, Mass. -- In a new sign of division over the path to peace in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Russia has issued a strong private message to President Clinton warning him not to lift the arms embargo against the Bosnian government, administration officials said yesterday.Mr. Clinton said last month that he would press for a lifting of the embargo if the Bosnian Serbs had not accepted a peace settlement drafted by the Western allies and Russia by Oct. 15. The embargo bars arms shipments to all sides in the conflict, but hurts the Bosnian government most because the Bosnian Serbs are much better armed.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Watching with horror the aggression of the Bosnian Serbs, the Islamic world is stepping up pressure on government leaders to help the besieged and outgunned Bosnian Muslims.But when it comes to serious military assistance, most Muslim countries either won't be able to afford to send troops, heavy weapons or money, or will recoil like the United States from becoming embroiled in a Balkan war, several experts say.The Muslim world's role in Bosnia is becoming a central issue in the growing debate in Washington and Europe over whether the beleaguered United Nations peacekeeping force should withdraw and the U.N.-imposed arms embargo be lifted.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - Yielding to pressure from President Bush and threats of retaliation from Congress, the European Union has put off plans to lift its arms embargo on China this spring and may not press the issue until next year, U.S. and European officials said yesterday. The officials said that in addition to U.S. pressure, European nations had been shaken by the recent adoption of legislation by the Chinese National People's Congress authorizing the use of force to stop Taiwan from seceding.
NEWS
December 12, 2000
Opposition leads in Ghana election, fails to win outright ACCRA, Ghana - Ghana's opposition New Patriotic Party has overtaken the ruling party in parliamentary elections but failed to win an outright majority in the new assembly, provisional returns showed yesterday. NPP leader John Kufuor led a presidential vote held on the same day, although he failed to get enough votes to win outright and will face Vice President John Atta Mills in a runoff within 21 days of the official result being announced.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 10, 1998
LONDON -- Using a new arms embargo and an ultimatum, the United States and five other nations moved yesterday to blunt Serbia's crackdown against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo, where dozens of deaths have imperiled the peace in the often volatile Balkan region.The governments also gave Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic a 10-day deadline to withdraw special police units from Kosovo and open talks with moderate Albanians in the province. If Milosevic does not comply, Serbia faces additional sanctions from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia.
NEWS
December 13, 1995
PRESIDENT CLINTON flies to Paris tonight to put the full majesty of his office behind a peace-enforcement treaty for Bosnia that divides the American people and has scant congressional approval for its precise terms. He has, in our view, full constitutional authority to send 20,000 U.S. troops to Bosnia. rTC But we continue to doubt the wisdom or viability of an agreement that G.I.s, at great peril, are expected to uphold.There are no heroes in this crisis. Mr. Clinton flipped and flopped in trying to avoid a conflict in which U.S. vital interests (contrary to his latest comments)
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The leaders of Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia yesterday agreed to end Europe's worst conflict since World War II, setting the stage for a risky peacekeeping role for a NATO force led by 20,000 U.S. troops.To be formally signed next month, the accord is meant to halt a 3 1/2 -year war that has claimed more than 200,000 lives, left 2 million people homeless and shocked the world with the genocidal horror of mass executions, systematic rapes and forced dislocation of civilians.The Balkan leaders agreed to divide Bosnia into two separate and largely autonomous zones of roughly equal size.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton kept his promise to the NATO allies yesterday by vetoing legislation that calls for lifting the arms embargo on Bosnia, a move that he insists would make a bad situation worse."
NEWS
August 3, 1995
While the U.S. Congress continues to meddle destructively in the Balkans, Croatian forces have moved decisively in the past week to readjust a military balance that has consistently favored the Serbs since the breakup of the Yugoslav federation. The contrast between blather on the banks of the Potomac and the realities of an ever-shifting civil war has rarely been stronger.If the re-equipped and retrained Croatian army can effectively put pressure on the Bosnian Serb aggressors without precipitating an open clash with the powers that be in Belgrade, this could have far more impact on the three-year struggle than posturing on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
July 10, 1991
President Bush today lifted the five-year-old economic sanctions against South Africa.Bush, acting in the face of opposition from some key Democrats and the NAACP, said he expected continued progress toward equality, and added that an arms embargo would remain in effect.See stories on A12.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- With a resounding bipartisan vote, the House yesterday joined the Senate in ordering an end to U.S. participation in the arms embargo against Bosnia.The 298-128 House tally, which follows a Senate vote last week of 69-29 on an identical measure, sends the binding resolution to the White House with margins large enough in both chambers to override President Clinton's threatened veto.But Democratic foes of the embargo said they did not expect to be able to hold all their troops in line against what is likely to be enormous White House pressure.
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