Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArms Control
IN THE NEWS

Arms Control

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In the annals of bureaucratic warfare, the fight over the future of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency stands out as almost genteel, waged with well-argued memos and so little back-stabbing that hardly anyone pays attention.But the outcome could have a profound impact on the United States's post-Cold War effort to curb weapons proliferation and safely reduce the former Soviet Union's nuclear arsenal.President Clinton is poised to decide the fate of the agency, which was created to advise the president and secretary of state on ways to curb the arms race and negotiate and implement agreements.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The recent editorial on arms control ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18) was exactly on point. More than two decades have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and U.S. national security strategy has changed drastically. Yet many in Congress still refuse to heed the growing bipartisan chorus of former government officials and military leaders who argue that our current arsenal of approximately 5,000 nuclear weapons greatly exceeds U.S. security needs. Our government plans to spend approximately $640 billion on nuclear weapons and related programs over the next decade.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 7, 2001
THE COLD WAR ended a decade ago but not until last week did the U.S. president call for an end to the world arms control regime it spawned, to be replaced by one reflecting current realities. Most discussed of those is the possible imminent ability of a middle-sized tyranny such as Iraq or North Korea to harm the United States sufficiently to deter Washington from intervening against it in a regional struggle. Less discussed is that Russia is no longer seen as an equal power. To deal with this, in his celebrated speech to the National Defense University in Washington last Tuesday, President Bush avoided tearing up the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABM)
NEWS
February 18, 2013
President Barack Obama's call during the State of the Union address to reduce the threat of nuclear war could not have been more timely. The day before the president spoke, North Korea tested a primitive nuclear device, and the following day reports surfaced of Iranian attempts to buy technology that would greatly speed up its production of weapons-grade uranium. Mr. Obama's remarks focused on cutting the U.S. and Russian strategic arsenals in a way that maintains their deterrent function but reduces the chances of a conflict breaking out by accident or miscalculation.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Hundreds of Americans and Russians spent nine years putting together the new treaty to cut strategic nuclear arms. Only half-facetiously, however, some in government are looking at the challenges ahead and calling the pact signed Wednesday in Moscow the end of "easy" arms control.The Persian Gulf war and its aftermath have spotlighted a whole new array of seemingly intractable arms control problems, sure to put a heavy burden on the now friendly superpowers.The immediate focus may be on the Middle East and its always mounting stores of weapons, where an impending Arab-Israeli peace conference under superpower auspices may, or may not, reduce historic antagonisms enough to ease the way to arms restraint.
NEWS
July 23, 2000
THROUGHOUT the Cold War, a main objective of U.S. policy was to divide the two great Communist powers, the Soviet Union and China. The last thing that Washington should want now is to allow the old Communist alliance to be revived against this country's interests. President Vladimir V. Putin made a splashy debut in big power politics by limning such a revival, traveling to the Group of Eight summit on Okinawa via Beijing and Pyongyang. It was skillfully done. Mr. Putin agreed with China's President Jiang Zemin that the U.S. national missile defense project undermines strategic stability and provokes an arms race.
NEWS
December 21, 2010
The bipartisan spirit evident in Congress' recent passage of major tax-cut legislation and repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy banning gays from serving openly in the military seems to have evaporated over the weekend in the roll up to a vote on the New START arms control treaty with the Russians. Senate debate on the measure is scheduled to start today, and the outlook for the treaty's success is unusually uncertain compared to major arms control agreements of the past at this stage.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 17, 2001
Arms control is something you never notice till it's gone. The Woodrow Wilson Bridge is federal taxpayers' present to Washington suburbanites. In Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York, motorists crossing them paid for the bridges. Marylands revenue projections are so bad that anyone who ought to be governor wont want to, and whoever does, shouldn't. Bin Ladens last tape will play forever.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
The recent editorial on arms control ("Avoiding Armageddon," Feb. 18) was exactly on point. More than two decades have passed since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and U.S. national security strategy has changed drastically. Yet many in Congress still refuse to heed the growing bipartisan chorus of former government officials and military leaders who argue that our current arsenal of approximately 5,000 nuclear weapons greatly exceeds U.S. security needs. Our government plans to spend approximately $640 billion on nuclear weapons and related programs over the next decade.
NEWS
December 30, 2010
The hurdles the Obama administration had to overcome in getting the New Start treaty ratified by the Senate this month could seem like child's play compared to what's ahead for the president as he seeks to implement the next phase of his arms control agenda. Where New Start built upon previous agreements aimed at reducing the overall number of U.S. and Russian long-range strategic nuclear weapons, future talks will focus on a trio of thorny issues — short-range tactical nukes, missile defense and a ban on underground nuclear testing — that have eluded arms control negotiators for decades.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
I can't quite understand why the government is tolerating any argument or debate over the issue of gun control. Anyone who takes the time to read it will realize the Constitution never mentions guns at all. The Second Amendment says the right to bear "arms" shall not be infringed. Arms includes a lot more than guns. It includes artillery, missiles, flame-throwers, grenades - even biological and nuclear weapons. All those things are "arms" by any definition. So there are already many restrictions on all types of arms already in place, and no one complains about them violating the Constitution.
NEWS
December 30, 2010
The hurdles the Obama administration had to overcome in getting the New Start treaty ratified by the Senate this month could seem like child's play compared to what's ahead for the president as he seeks to implement the next phase of his arms control agenda. Where New Start built upon previous agreements aimed at reducing the overall number of U.S. and Russian long-range strategic nuclear weapons, future talks will focus on a trio of thorny issues — short-range tactical nukes, missile defense and a ban on underground nuclear testing — that have eluded arms control negotiators for decades.
NEWS
December 21, 2010
The bipartisan spirit evident in Congress' recent passage of major tax-cut legislation and repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy banning gays from serving openly in the military seems to have evaporated over the weekend in the roll up to a vote on the New START arms control treaty with the Russians. Senate debate on the measure is scheduled to start today, and the outlook for the treaty's success is unusually uncertain compared to major arms control agreements of the past at this stage.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
What possible good can come of obstructing President Obama's effort to get a new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty ratified during the lame-duck session of Congress? ("Stalled on START," Nov.23). What, in good conscience, allows Republican Senator Jon Kyl to seek postponement of a treaty that has such far-reaching importance for the peace of the world, and who are these "American People" the Republican Party claims to represent with its desperation tactics who go along with dangerous political games designed to undo a sitting president in time to put the GOP's negative agenda in place across the board?
NEWS
November 23, 2010
President Barack Obama is facing the first big test of his post-midterm-election presidency in his effort to get a new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty ratified by the Senate during the lame-duck session of Congress. In the real world, the stakes are enormous: our relationship with Russia; the chance for meaningful sanctions against the rogue states of Iran and South Korea; the effort to reduce the number of nuclear weapons that could one day go astray — all ride on it. Unfortunately, the view looks different in the crucible of Washington, where Republicans are looking at the matter as determining whether Mr. Obama is still a force to reckoned with in the wake of the Democrats' devastating midterm election losses or if he is a weakened president going into the final two years of his term.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | January 16, 2007
The expected confirmation of retired Navy Adm. Mike McConnell as director of national intelligence will complete the Pentagon's takeover of the intelligence community and end any pretense of civilian influence, let alone control, of that community. Flag officers are in control of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Counterterrorism Center as well as the key position of undersecretary of defense for intelligence. The militarization of intelligence is a reversal of the kind of community that President Harry Truman began to create 60 years ago and will complicate efforts to rebuild the nation's strategic intelligence capabilities.
NEWS
By MARVIN FEUERWERGER | March 16, 1992
Washington -- The revelation that a North Korean ship bearing Scud-C missiles was able to evade American surveillance in the Persian Gulf is embarrassing to the American military. Far more significant, however, is the fact that the U.S. would not have stopped those missiles had the ship been found. As a result, North Korea and others may now believe that they are free to ship any and all arms to the Middle East with impunity.The sad truth is that there may be no effective way to prevent renegade states from subverting efforts at arms control apart from forcefully restricting the flow of arms -- a course virtually certain to bring international opprobrium.
NEWS
July 12, 1991
The wisdom of holding the next superpower summit hostage to completion of a Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty might be on the verge of being confirmed. Now that President Bush has asserted explicitly that START "must be finished up" before he makes a long-delayed journey to Moscow, a high-powered Soviet delegation is in Washington ostensibly to do just that.Presumably this delegation, chaired by Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander Bessmertnykh, has more authority to negotiate than has been the case in recent months.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2006
The Pentagon wants to get one thing straight: It is not building a "bionic" arm like the one test pilot Steve Austin got in The Six Million Dollar Man TV series more than 30 years ago. True, the government is paying the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory $30.4 million to spearhead development of a thought-controlled mechanical arm for the growing number of soldiers who lose their own in battle or accidents. But the new device won't give wearers super powers to carry back into combat.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush tapped John R. Bolton, a blunt-talking administration conservative who has been sharply critical of the United Nations, yesterday as the next U.S. ambassador to the world body. Democrats quickly reacted against the nomination, saying Bolton was the wrong man for the U.N. post at a time when the United States was seeking to mend fences with longtime allies after a period of disaffection resulting from the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq and other disagreements. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced the selection at a brief State Department ceremony, calling Bolton "a tough-minded diplomat" with a proven track record of success, and comparing him to two of the more colorful and outspoken Americans who have held the U.N. post, Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick and the late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.