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By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1993
The Andre Citroen Park, at 34.6 acres, is the largest park to open in Paris in more than a century. Occupying the site of a former Citroen car factory, the city-owned park opened in September on the Left Bank in the 15th Arrondissement, near the Seine and the Eiffel Tower.The park, viewed from above, could be compared to a human body with extended arms and legs, the torso being a huge lawn, each of the arms and legs a garden and the eyes, two immense greenhouses. The grass is open for play, an unusual concession in Paris, where many public lawns are off-limits.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
Salary: $32,000 Age: 32 Years on the job: 10 How she got started: After high school, Erica Small knew she wanted to go into the medical field and started taking classes at what is now Stevenson University. She switched to the Community College of Baltimore County and became certified as an emergency medical technician and a certified nursing assistant. While still in school, she began working as a patient service associate in Sinai Hospital's emergency room.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing WriterUnited Feature Syndicate | August 18, 1992
You can't train effectively for strength and endurance in the same exercise.Muscles are made up of two major types of fibers. There are red, slow-twitch fibers used for endurance. And there are white, fast-twitch fibers used for strength and speed.Endurance training converts fast-twitch strength/speed fibers to slow-twitch endurance fibers. This transformation can slow you down and reduce your overall strength.Strength training reduces the part of the cell that produces energy for continuous movement.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | October 5, 2006
October is a month for intellectual clarity. Try to keep that in mind. Cold is a stimulant, heat a depressant. October is when the Reformation began. Our guys in Germany were walking around enjoying the fall colors and the beer and they thought, "Hey, why am I paying money to the church to scoot me into heaven? Nuts to that." A big step for mankind, and it led to public education, the free press and rationalism, which led to the telephone, the Internet and aviation, which was what took me to Missoula, Mont.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
The head of the state's social services agency defended yesterday his workers' performance in attempting to protect the children of Keisha Carr, who was convicted of killing one infant son and breaking the arms and legs of another. "It is tragic every time a child dies, whether in our system or outside of it, but we can no more prevent all child abuse than highly competent police officers can prevent all homicides," Christopher J. McCabe, secretary of the Maryland Department of Human Resources, wrote in an e-mail to The Sun. Carr, a 23-year-old former security guard from West Baltimore, was on probation for breaking the arms and legs of her oldest son, James Carr IV, when she killed her second child, David, on Feb. 12 last year, by breaking his skull, ribs and leg, according to court records.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - Although he was only a practice spectator, senior wide receiver Guilian Gary rejoined the Maryland Terrapins football team yesterday, one day after suffering a neck sprain that left him with a loss of feeling in his arms and legs and required him to be flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Gary, who underwent X-rays, a magnetic resonance imaging exam and computer scan procedures on Tuesday night, was released from Kernan Hospital yesterday morning. By then, he said normal feeling had returned in his arms and legs.
NEWS
By MARILYN GEEWAX | May 29, 1991
"TC Atlanta. - Fashions and hairstyles come and go, but one thing American men seem to like decade after decade is the Blonde Bombshell.Jean Harlow tantalized the male masses in the 1930s, but Marilyn Monroe perfected the role in the 1950s. She was flirtatious, fluffy, well-rounded and soft-spoken. Her arms and legs showed no ripples of muscle to undermine the image of vulnerability.But while the Sex Goddess role is still being filled by voluptuous women, today's bombshells add up to much more than their measurements.
TRAVEL
By Kristin Jackson and Kristin Jackson,Seattle Times | August 27, 2006
It's a twentysomething's fantasy: Travel around the world, dance a lot and get paid to do it. Matt Harding of Seattle made that dream come true. And he's turning into an Internet star, thanks to a video he made of his recent trip that's become wildly popular on the Web. Harding's 3 1/2 -minute video shows him dancing in dozens of countries. He dances at familiar sites, from China's Great Wall to the Machu Picchu ruins in Peru. He dances amid a crowd on a busy Tokyo street, beside bemused Buddhist monks in Laos, alone on a sand dune in Namibia.
NEWS
May 9, 1994
Youth who was assaulted arrested on drug chargesA 16-year-old Brooklyn Park youth who was assaulted and robbed Thursday morning at an apartment house on Fourth Avenue has been arrested on drug charges, county police said.Police said they arrested the youth after suspected marijuana seeds, a suspected small marijuana plant, two pipes, and a spoon containing a cotton ball and white residue were found at the Fourth Avenue address where the attack occurred.The youth told police that three men wearing dark clothes, dark glasses and hooded sweat shirts that covered their faces broke into the house about 8:20 a.m.Police said the intruders grabbed the victim and threatened to kill him. They handcuffed him, put leg irons on him and wrapped duct tape around his head to cover his eyes, police said.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
A 33-year-old man was fatally shot yesterday as he walked along a West Baltimore street, and police are continuing to investigate the slaying Tuesday of a 17-year-old boy who was chased by a gunman who fired 14 shots at him, investigators said.Yesterday's shooting occurred about 3:10 p.m. when a man shot Ricky Lee Cunningham in the back as he walked with a woman along the west side of the 600 block of N. Fremont Ave., police said.Mr. Cunningham, of the 600 block of W. Lafayette Ave., was apparently ambushed by the unidentified man, police said.
TRAVEL
By Kristin Jackson and Kristin Jackson,Seattle Times | August 27, 2006
It's a twentysomething's fantasy: Travel around the world, dance a lot and get paid to do it. Matt Harding of Seattle made that dream come true. And he's turning into an Internet star, thanks to a video he made of his recent trip that's become wildly popular on the Web. Harding's 3 1/2 -minute video shows him dancing in dozens of countries. He dances at familiar sites, from China's Great Wall to the Machu Picchu ruins in Peru. He dances amid a crowd on a busy Tokyo street, beside bemused Buddhist monks in Laos, alone on a sand dune in Namibia.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | July 24, 2006
First it sweltered, then it poured, but the weather seemed hardly to dampen the enthusiasm of the crowds that descended on Artscape, Baltimore's 25th annual outdoor festival of the arts. From funnel cakes to evening concerts there was much that was familiar along the Mount Royal Avenue corridor and elsewhere around the city - but there also were new touches including the 100-foot-tall Ferris wheel in front of the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall and the fireworks on Friday's opening night. We sent a team of arts writers - pop music critic Rashod Ollison, theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, classical music critic Tim Smith, restaurant critic Elizabeth Large and art critic Glenn McNatt - to survey the scene.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
It has been 11 months since Nicolas Anderson crashed his car into a New Jersey guardrail that severed one leg, crushed the other and left his left hand dangling without feeling or motion. Yesterday, in an exotic, six-hour operation at Johns Hopkins Hospital, surgeons hoped to turn his hand into a useful instrument again - by grafting nerves from his mother's arms and legs into his damaged left arm. Neurosurgeon Allan J. Belzberg said the operation went well, though it will take several months for the nerves to grow and connect to muscles in the hand.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2005
There's a guy at my gym who's always doing one-leg push-ups. I've seen people do push-ups on one arm before, but can you explain how to do a single-leg push-up? My arms and legs are strong, and I think it would add a challenge to my routine. Performing a push-up with the support of just one leg can be difficult, but when done correctly it's a great way to kick your push-up routine into a higher gear. To do a one-leg or "leg-lift" push-up, begin in the traditional push-up position. Your feet should be hip-width apart, with your arms straight and your abdominal muscles tight so your body is flat like a board.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
The head of the state's social services agency defended yesterday his workers' performance in attempting to protect the children of Keisha Carr, who was convicted of killing one infant son and breaking the arms and legs of another. "It is tragic every time a child dies, whether in our system or outside of it, but we can no more prevent all child abuse than highly competent police officers can prevent all homicides," Christopher J. McCabe, secretary of the Maryland Department of Human Resources, wrote in an e-mail to The Sun. Carr, a 23-year-old former security guard from West Baltimore, was on probation for breaking the arms and legs of her oldest son, James Carr IV, when she killed her second child, David, on Feb. 12 last year, by breaking his skull, ribs and leg, according to court records.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
When all else fails, run with the ball. For quarterbacks Michael Vick and Donovan McNabb, it's an unwritten code. Pass plays are hit and miss, but running almost always tweaks a defense where it hurts most - on third down. The battle of the running quarterbacks will unfold tomorrow night when Vick's upstart Atlanta Falcons challenge McNabb's front-running Philadelphia Eagles in an NFC semifinal playoff game. If McNabb weren't playing his first game since breaking an ankle Nov. 17, this almost certainly would become a track meet.
NEWS
By Fay Lande and Fay Lande,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 21, 1997
ArtHoCo, a biennial exhibition of work by artists who live, work or study in Howard County, is like an old-fashioned variety store, filled with interesting items and intriguing possibilities.In spite of its trendy name, the show at the Howard County Center for the Arts has a neighborly feel.Accomplished work sits side by side with laudable efforts by less-experienced artists. Styles range from 17th century to surreal and avant-garde.It's a comfortable show.A child with dark eyes and round cheeks looks out through a jagged doorway in Tae Won Kim's photograph "Looking Out."
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
BLACKSBURG, Va. - If Rayna DuBose had sworn to never visit the Virginia Tech campus again, the whole world would have understood. After all, it was here that meningococcal meningitis robbed her of so much. It was here that a promising college basketball career turned into a nightmare. It was here, in April, that she slipped into a coma after lifting weights one day with the Hokies women's basketball team, and nearly lost her life. When DuBose woke up in the University of Virginia Medical Center three weeks later, doctors told her the infection, which caused swelling in her brain and spinal cord, had caused so much tissue damage, they needed to amputate her hands and feet.
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