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BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
As if on an autumn Sunday, the investors made their way through the dark, dank bowels of M&T Bank Stadium, concrete walls all around them. They wore the team uniform: button-down shirts and khaki pants or dark suits. Waiting in the locker room was Under Armour Chief Executive Officer Kevin A. Plank and his team of executives, welcoming the investors into the world of the athlete. "When you walked in you noticed the authentic smell," Plank told the 90 people in attendance yesterday at the Baltimore company's first Investor Day, as the investors tapped on computers and scribbled notes rather than going over football plays.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 31, 2013
Baltimore-based apparel manufacturer Under Armour announced fourth-quarter profits of $506 million, representing a 25 percent increase from the same period in 2011. The company also announced its full-year revenues of $1.835 billion represented a 25 percent increase, year over year. "We closed 2012 strongly, delivering net revenue growth of at least 20% for the eleventh consecutive quarter in Q4 by building upon key apparel technology platforms like Storm Fleece and Charged Cotton," Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Nick Cienski is climbing to the 14 highest and grandest places in the world - because of what he's seen in some of what are effectively the lowest and most squalid. In November 2014, the Upper Fells Point resident will scale Cho Oyu, the sixth-highest mountain in the world. When he tops the 29,906-foot mountain, located in Tibet in the western end of the Himalayas, he will have climbed six of 14 of the world's 8,000-meter-plus peaks in less than one year, breaking a world record.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2011
Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank quickly built a sports apparel empire that went public in less than a decade. But when the Baltimore business mogul launched cross-training and running shoe lines a few years ago, he hit a speed bump. The shoes flopped with some consumers and ended up on clearance racks across the country. Now Plank's company is hoping to make a footwear comeback after what he called a "reset" period. Under Armour spent months cleaning house. The company replaced the footwear team, redesigned shoes and switched marketing strategies.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 10, 2012
The Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation will honor Muhammad Ali and Under Armour at its annual Aspire Gala on Feb. 22, 2013 at the Waterfront Marriott, the group announced Monday. Ali and his wife, Lonnie, will be presented with the Aspire Award. Founder and CEO Kevin Plank will accept the same award on behalf of Under Armour. Robbie Callaway, former chairman of the Ripken board, will receive the Cal Sr. Award. All are being honored for their dedication to community service. Ali's humanitarian efforts are -- or should be -- well known to just about every sports fan. A news release from the foundation lauds his and Lonnie's work with soup kitchens, hospitals, the Make-A-Wish Foundation and the Special Olympics.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER | January 15, 2009
Under Armour shares slumped 13 percent yesterday after the Baltimore sports apparel company said that fourth-quarter earnings probably would be lower than expected because of the weak retail environment. The company expects revenue of $179 million to $180 million and earnings per share of 16 cents to 18 cents for the quarter that ended Dec. 31. Analysts polled by Thomson Reuters had predicted a higher revenue of $209.7 million, or 49 cents per share. Under Armour will release fourth-quarter results Jan. 29. The company said that it had a higher cancellation than expected of orders from wholesalers.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | February 2, 2007
Sports apparel company Under Armour Inc. said yesterday that 2007 sales growth is likely to slow compared with last year's increase, but it expects demand for its moisture-wicking apparel to remain sound as it introduces new products and expands an already aggressive marketing campaign. Baltimore-based Under Armour reported fourth-quarter earnings yesterday that were 69 percent higher than a year earlier but came in slightly lower than expected. Wall Street punished the company's stock, sending it down 7.15 percent, or $3.63, to close at $46.17.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
Under Armour shares soared nearly 11 percent yesterday to reach an all-time high after the company raised its financial outlook for the year. The stock rose as high as $64.75 during the day before it finally settled to close at $61.24. The company said its improved forecast, which it announced during a scheduled release of second quarter earnings, came after a better-than-expected first half of the year as sales increased across the business in the women's, men's and youth categories.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Athletic wear company Under Armour Inc. submitted an application to the New York Stock Exchange yesterday and expects to begin trading on what is considered the world's most prominent bourse next month. The Baltimore company hopes to make the jump to the NYSE not long after having become a public company. Under Armour has traded on the Nasdaq stock market since Nov. 18 last year. Shares have risen 85 percent from the closing price of $25.30 on the first day of trading. It closed yesterday at $46.25, down 60 cents.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | October 21, 1991
Debra Joplin of Huntsville, Ark., would not be able to work if her employer, Armour Swift-Eckrich, hadn't opened an on-site community child-care center last June.Joplin, 33, whose children are 9 and 6 years old, was a full-time homemaker. Her husband, Jerry, worked in oil fields in Texas, commuting back and forth to the Ozarks."I needed a job for the extra income, but who would take care of the children?" said Joplin, whose rural hometown of 1,400 people had only one day-care center with a long waiting list.
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