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NEWS
July 5, 2000
What's for dinner Armadillos eat ants, termites, maggots and sometimes plants. Although pink and soft when it is born, the armadillo will grow hard, bony body plates to protect it from predators. Even its tail is armored! These tough animals live in dry areas of the western United States and throughout South America--using a long sticky tongue, a good sense of smell and sharp claws to find food.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
Dundalk-based Federal Armored Express Inc., the nation's fourth-largest armored transportation company, has bought the customer accounts of Loomis Armored Inc. in Washington, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and Virginia for an undisclosed amount."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
Dr. James Ellicott Tyson Hopkins, a retired thoracic surgeon and decorated World War II veteran who drew on his battlefield experience to advocate for the use of body armor, died of heart failure Monday at his home near Bel Air. He was 99. He served during World War II with a fabled unit, Merrill's Marauders, behind enemy lines in Burma. Born on his family's farm near Highland in Howard County, he was a descendant of Johns Hopkins, the Quaker philanthropist who founded the Baltimore hospital and university.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | July 17, 1993
FAIRFIELD, Ohio -- Amid the Cadillacs, Chevy Caprices and Mercedes Benzes in stages of repair on the factory floor at O'Gara-Hess & Eisenhardt stands a white, gold-trimmed Grand Jeep Cherokee. A limited edition in more ways than one.It may look like a yuppie plaything. But looks can be deceiving. This four-wheel-drive suburban hill-climber is endowed with protective armor to deflect bullets from 9 mm and .357 Magnum handguns, or an Uzi machine pistol. And if a sharpshooter flattens the tires with four fast ones, the Jeep can speed away on its specially equipped nylon flat rims.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 24, 2008
Floyd Dwight Burch, a retired armored-car supervisor and World War II Marine Corps veteran, died from complications of lupus Friday at Harford Memorial Hospital. The Churchville resident was 80. Mr. Burch was born in Hughesville, and after the death of his parents he was sent to the Episcopal Home for Children in Chevy Chase. He attended Montgomery County public schools through the eighth grade. Although the legal age for military enlistment was 18, he misled Marine recruiters and signed up when he was 17, family members said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A Howard County judge denied yesterday a request for a reduced sentence from a man serving a life term for the murder of an armored-car guard.Tyrone M. Colbert, 31, was sentenced to life plus 20 years after pleading guilty to the January 1989 robbery and slaying of Frederick John Cook, a 23-year veteran of Loomis Armored."
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The thousands of troops that President Bush is expected to order to Iraq will join the fight largely without the protection of the latest armored vehicles that withstand bomb blasts far better than the Humvees in wide use, military officers said. Vehicles such as the Cougar and the M1117 Armored Security Vehicle have proven ability to save lives, but production started late and relatively small numbers are in use in Iraq, mostly because of money shortages, industry officials said.
FEATURES
November 27, 2009
Dec. 4 Armored: (Screen Gems) Officers at an armored transport security firm risk their lives when they embark on a heist against their own company. With Matt Dillon, Jean Reno and Laurence Fishburne. Brothers : (Lionsgate) When a decorated Marine goes missing in Afghanistan, his black-sheep younger brother cares for his wife and children at home. With Tobey Maguire, Jake Gyllenhaal, Natalie Portman and Sam Shepard. Everybody's Fine: (Miramax) In this remake of Giuseppe Tornatore's "Stanno Tutti Bene," a widower embarks on an impromptu road trip to reconnect with each of his grown children.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 1, 2001
Two gunmen robbed an armored car delivering money to an Elkridge bank yesterday, police said. Both of the robbers fled and were being sought by police. The amount stolen from the armored car was not disclosed. Police said the Brinks car arrived at the FCNB Bank in the 7200 block of Montgomery Road shortly before 10 a.m. Two guards were with the car, and as one of them unloaded cash from the vehicle, a blue pickup truck backed up to it. Two men brandishing handguns got out of the truck.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
James B. Culp Sr., a retired mechanical engineer and World War II combat veteran who was present for the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp, died of congestive heart failure July 13 at his home in the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Catonsville resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Mulberry Street, he was the son of Harry G. Culp, a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee, and Elizabeth Dorsey Culp, a homemaker. Mr. Culp was a 1939 Polytechnic Institute graduate and earned a bachelor's degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art . He joined the Army in 1942 and was assigned to the 6th Armored Division, known as the Fighting Turtles.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A federal judge sentenced two partners in an armored-car stick up crew to 32 years and a day each in prison. Erick Wilson, 28 from Columbia and David Marquise Howard, 29, from Baltimore held up employees of Dunbar Armored at gunpoint, stealing cash from them. The robberies, carried out in Maryland and Washington, D.C., took place between 2008 and 2011, earning the pair and their crew $765,000. Wilson was sentenced Wednesday and Howard Tuesday. Both pleaded guilty to six robberies.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Dunbar Armored has been in the armored-car business for nearly 90 years. But the Hunt Valley-based company now is branching into a new way to protect banks' and businesses' money and valuables: cybersecurity. The company is launching a subsidiary, Dunbar Digital Armored, early next year to tap into the growing need to protect online transactions for its thousands of bank and retail customers. Dunbar will focus its cybersecurity products on small and mid-size companies that are looking for tech-savvy solutions but don't have the deep pockets or cybersecurity expertise of the big banks.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
A Baltimore man who helped rob hundreds of thousands of dollars and multiple handguns from five armored vehicle drivers over the course of three years pleaded guilty to multiple robbery and gun charges Thursday, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's office. David Marquise Howard, 27 — who is also listed as having addresses in Owings Mills and Hyattsville in federal court documents — participated in stealing a total of $555,000 in the robberies, which he planned and staged from 2009 to 2011 with four others, according to his plea agreement.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The suspect in the Colorado movie theater shootings is not and has never been a member of the armed forces, the Pentagon said Friday. Authorities say shooting suspect James Holmes carried an assault rifle, a shotgun and a handgun and wore full body armor during the attack that left 12 dead and dozens injured at the theater in Aurora, Colo. Police say his apartment was rigged with explosives. The Pentagon said two airmen and one sailor were injured in the attack. Another sailor who was known to have been at the theater was unaccounted for. Aurora is home to Buckley Air Force Base, and an hour's drive from the Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
A Beverly Hills sports drink maker being sued by Baltimore-based Under Armour Inc. says the trademark infringement lawsuit is without merit, according to court documents filed Thursday. The lawsuit filed April 26 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore says drink maker Body Armor Nutrition LLC uses a brand name and logo that confuses consumers. The complaint seeks an injunction banning the California company from using the name Body Armor and a logo and tagline that Under Armour says is similar to its own. Body Armor's court filing says it would be nearly impossible for consumers to confuse brands that sell unrelated products.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | October 23, 1991
A Columbia man pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and armed robbery yesterday in the slaying of an armored-car guard, in exchange for a sentence of life plus 20 years.Assistant state's attorney Timothy Wolf, who prosecuted the case, said Tyrone Colbert, 29, could have received life plus 40 years in the shooting death of Frederick John Cook Jr. of Middle River.Mr. Cook, a guard for the Loomis Armored car company, was slain Jan. 11, 1990, outside the Signet Bank at Long Reach Village Center in Columbia.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
Inside a two-story, cylindrical metal structure at Aberdeen Proving Ground, scientists detonate a homemade bomb to take high-speed pictures of the shrapnel flying apart. Elsewhere on the Army installation in Harford County, soldiers train on radio jammers intended to render enemy remote controls useless. At still another location, inventors work on hand-held test kits that will enable troops to identify chemicals used by bomb makers. All of the activity is aimed at stopping the signature weapon of the enemy in Afghanistan and Iraq: the improvised explosive device, the IED, which has been responsible for more than half the American combat deaths over the past decade and many of the brain injuries and amputations.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Johns Hopkins University will use a $90 million award to form an institute that will help the Army develop lightweight materials to better protect soldiers and vehicles, university officials said Wednesday. The Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute will focus on what happens to protective materials at the moment of intense impact. "Both individuals and governments have become increasingly insecure over the last 10 years or so," said K.T. Ramesh, the professor who will direct the institute.
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