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Armistice Day

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NEWS
November 9, 1990
Armistice Day was lucky for the doughboys fighting in the trenches at the end of World War I, and many Maryland lottery players apparently think it will be lucky for them, too.State lottery officials say the Pick 4 number 1111 has been sold out since Wednesday, and has sold out again for Sunday. They're guessing that the reason is the approach of Sunday, Nov. 11, or 11/11.Originally established in 1926 to commemorate the armistice that ended World War I at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, 1918, Armistice Day was renamed Veterans Day in 1954 to honor all men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces.
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NEWS
by Louise Vest | January 28, 2014
January 1965 Ice escapades Times notes: "Ice skating has become the winter sport for Donleigh, now that the frozen flooded (purposely) field near the swimming pool offers a close, perfect opportunity. Several adults as well as children were seen having a ball last week. Among those enjoying the nippy pastime were Allen, David and Vincent Short, and Mrs. Helen Short; Mr. Richard Wiseman, Mr. Tom Jones, Kathleen and Ellen Bailey, Debbie, Susan and Phillip Plaskowitz, and Mrs. Jacqueline Gray.
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NEWS
By Mike Burns | November 17, 1996
ARMISTICE DAY was what it was called when I was a child. A distant point in time in a vague war that was dimmed in memory by that which had just been won by painful human sacrifice that could be seen in every street of our small town, and especially at the local cemetery.There was no mistaking the loss of furloughed Tom, whose right sleeve was empty of the limb he had given up in agony on some battlefield in Europe. Or of Mrs. Thompson, whose parlor table was crowded with the photographs of a smiling son who would never come home.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
In 1918, at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, guns all over the world fell silent and the whole world experienced peace and hope. A French Christmas carol recalls the feeling in the "le monde entier tressaille d'espérance," which roughly translates as "the entire world trembles with hope. " For about 30 years in this country, Nov. 11th was celebrated as Armistice Day. The name referred to the peace instrument that ended what we called "The World War" and thought of then as "the war to end all wars.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | November 17, 1996
25 years ago George Plimpton, the unquenchable amateur, tries his hand as a rookie quarterback for the Baltimore Colts on "Plimpton! The Great Quarterback Sneak," a one-hour ABC television network special at 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 26 on WJZ-TV. From the start of the training season, at the Colts' camp in Westminster through all the classes, scrimmages, calisthenics and inevitable trips to the infirmary, George observed and, whenever humanly possible, participated. He had donned football helmet and shoulder padding before to do research for a book, the best-selling "Paper Lion."
EXPLORE
November 10, 2011
The 11th hour is a term that's become part of the English language. Born of war, it has come to mean a deal struck at the last minute. Its origin is the dubious end of World War I, known before World War II as The Great War, a negotiated armistice that took effect at 11 a.m. Nov. 11, 1918, though it had been agreed to many hours prior to that. Because of the lapse between the signing of the cease fire agreement and the actual cease fire, deadly military operations continued, even as it was known to those giving and taking orders that the operations were pointless.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
IT BEGAN as Armistice Day, to commemorate the end of fighting in World War I at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. Not surprisingly, its meaning faded during the hell of World War II.Nov. 11 was given over to solemn observation of the sacrifice in that war until a federal law of 1970 said that Veterans Day honoring those who served in all wars would be observed on the fourth Monday of October. Resistance was so great that as of 1976, Nov. 11 was federally reinstated as Veterans Day. And so it has remained.
NEWS
November 11, 1995
TODAY FOR THE 75TH time, Americans pause to honor its veterans. Hardly a locality does not observe this holiday. Respect for those called upon to interrupt their careers and those who chose to devote their lives to the calling of defender of the nation is nearly universal. This is true even when the wars the men and women waged were unpopular. Americans know that politicians and statesmen are responsible for starting -- or not preventing -- wars. Members of the armed services are responsible for ending them.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | November 8, 2012
Sunday marks the 94th anniversary of the end of what would for a time be known as The War to End All Wars, but has since been re-named to reflect the unfortunate reality that not only was it not the last, but also not the last on an epic scale. These days, the history books call it World War I. The centennial of the beginning of the complicated conflict that shaped the world we live in is but two years away, and in the 100 years since the beginning of the first world war, there has been not only a second world war, but also countless other deadly conflicts.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
In 1918, at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, guns all over the world fell silent and the whole world experienced peace and hope. A French Christmas carol recalls the feeling in the "le monde entier tressaille d'espérance," which roughly translates as "the entire world trembles with hope. " For about 30 years in this country, Nov. 11th was celebrated as Armistice Day. The name referred to the peace instrument that ended what we called "The World War" and thought of then as "the war to end all wars.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
An armistice ending the hostilities between Germany and the Allied Nations became effective on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918. Armistice Day, which was commemorated for the first time on November 11, 1919, became a legal holiday in 1938. Veteran service organizations urged Congress in 1954 to change the word "Armistice" to "Veterans," transforming it from a day honoring World War I heroes to one honoring all American veterans - particularly living veterans. A grateful nation annually honors and recognizes more than 23.4 million living veterans on November 11, paying respects to all who have answered the call to military service.
EXPLORE
November 9, 2012
A peaceful Veterans Day to you, dear readers, Veterans Day, Nov. 11 (observed Monday, Nov. 12), is a tribute to all of those who served in our armed forces. In reality, the day is also titled Armistice Day and Remembrance Day in Canada, in recognition of the surrender of Imperial Germany in World War I on Nov. 11, 1918. It has been named Veterans Day since 1954. The Veterans Day observance sponsored by the American Legion Post 47 will commence at 11 a.m. in Tydings Park to honor all military veterans.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | November 8, 2012
Sunday marks the 94th anniversary of the end of what would for a time be known as The War to End All Wars, but has since been re-named to reflect the unfortunate reality that not only was it not the last, but also not the last on an epic scale. These days, the history books call it World War I. The centennial of the beginning of the complicated conflict that shaped the world we live in is but two years away, and in the 100 years since the beginning of the first world war, there has been not only a second world war, but also countless other deadly conflicts.
EXPLORE
November 10, 2011
The 11th hour is a term that's become part of the English language. Born of war, it has come to mean a deal struck at the last minute. Its origin is the dubious end of World War I, known before World War II as The Great War, a negotiated armistice that took effect at 11 a.m. Nov. 11, 1918, though it had been agreed to many hours prior to that. Because of the lapse between the signing of the cease fire agreement and the actual cease fire, deadly military operations continued, even as it was known to those giving and taking orders that the operations were pointless.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | November 17, 1996
ARMISTICE DAY was what it was called when I was a child. A distant point in time in a vague war that was dimmed in memory by that which had just been won by painful human sacrifice that could be seen in every street of our small town, and especially at the local cemetery.There was no mistaking the loss of furloughed Tom, whose right sleeve was empty of the limb he had given up in agony on some battlefield in Europe. Or of Mrs. Thompson, whose parlor table was crowded with the photographs of a smiling son who would never come home.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | November 17, 1996
25 years ago George Plimpton, the unquenchable amateur, tries his hand as a rookie quarterback for the Baltimore Colts on "Plimpton! The Great Quarterback Sneak," a one-hour ABC television network special at 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 26 on WJZ-TV. From the start of the training season, at the Colts' camp in Westminster through all the classes, scrimmages, calisthenics and inevitable trips to the infirmary, George observed and, whenever humanly possible, participated. He had donned football helmet and shoulder padding before to do research for a book, the best-selling "Paper Lion."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 11, 1993
Moving higher in what one Baltimore broker called a "NAFTA rally," the Dow Jones industrial average gained 23.48 points yesterday, closing at 3,663.55. Investors apparently believed Tuesday's debate improved chances of the trade agreement's passage, a development considered favorable for Wall Street.LOOKING BACK: On Veterans Day 10 years ago today, Nov. 11, 1983, the Dow Jones industrial average closed at 1,250.20. (The Dow almost tripled in the last decade.) On this date 20 years ago, Nov. 11, 1973, the Dow finished at 908.41.
NEWS
by Louise Vest | January 28, 2014
January 1965 Ice escapades Times notes: "Ice skating has become the winter sport for Donleigh, now that the frozen flooded (purposely) field near the swimming pool offers a close, perfect opportunity. Several adults as well as children were seen having a ball last week. Among those enjoying the nippy pastime were Allen, David and Vincent Short, and Mrs. Helen Short; Mr. Richard Wiseman, Mr. Tom Jones, Kathleen and Ellen Bailey, Debbie, Susan and Phillip Plaskowitz, and Mrs. Jacqueline Gray.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
IT BEGAN as Armistice Day, to commemorate the end of fighting in World War I at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. Not surprisingly, its meaning faded during the hell of World War II.Nov. 11 was given over to solemn observation of the sacrifice in that war until a federal law of 1970 said that Veterans Day honoring those who served in all wars would be observed on the fourth Monday of October. Resistance was so great that as of 1976, Nov. 11 was federally reinstated as Veterans Day. And so it has remained.
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