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NEWS
April 11, 2000
William R. Miles Sr., 82, NSA division director William R. Miles Sr., a retired National Security Agency division director and former Navy submariner, died Sunday from complications of heart-bypass surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 82 and lived in Catonsville. After 17 years at the NSA at Fort Meade, he retired in 1973. Born and raised on Walbrook Avenue in West Baltimore, Mr. Miles attended Polytechnic Institute before he enlisted in the Navy. He spent his entire career aboard submarines and, during World War II, completed 13 patrols in the Pacific.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2003
Paul Darmofall, a folk artist whose glittering glass shard collages are esteemed by collectors worldwide and earned him the nickname of the Baltimore Glassman, died of a heart attack Sunday at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Perry Point. The Armistead Gardens resident was 78. "Whether it is glasphalt, the glittering bangles of Blaze Starr or the artwork of Paul Darmofall, they're all very Baltimore and known all over the world. And we ought to be proud of them," said Rebecca Hoffberger, founder and executive director of the American Visionary Art Museum.
NEWS
July 29, 1995
Christian Engleman Jr.Navy captainCapt. Christian L. Engleman Jr., a retired Navy electronics specialist who was credited with giving SONAR its name, died July 20 of complications from cancer at the Fort Vancouver Convalescent Center in Vancouver, Wash. He was 89 and had lived in Washington, D.C., and Arlington, Va.During World War II, he was serving with the Navy Bureau of Ships Electronics Installation and Maintenance Branch when he suggested the name SONAR to his former Harvard University professor Theodore Hunt, the developer of the underwater sound technique that was used in anti-submarine warfare.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
A 59-year-old Armistead Gardens resident involved in a bitter court dispute over his father's estate has been charged with soliciting a man to murder a Baltimore County judge.The suspect felt that the Circuit Court judge made unfavorable rulings in the case, according to city police. The estate is valued at more than $1 million.John T. Klauenberg was arrested Tuesday at his home in the 1000 block of Rodman Way and charged with soliciting to murder and conspiracy to commit murder.He was being held without bail last night at the Eastern District lockup, police said.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
A 59-year-old Armistead Gardens resident in a bitter court dispute over his father's estate has been charged with soliciting a man to murder a Baltimore County judge.The suspect felt that the Circuit Court judge made unfavorable rulings in the case, according to city police. The estate is valued at more than $1 million.John T. Klauenberg was arrested Tuesday at his home in the 1000 block of Rodman Way and charged with soliciting to murder and conspiracy to commit murder.He was being held without bail last night at the Eastern District lockup, police said.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | April 3, 1996
Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.Southeastern DistrictTheft from vehicle: Stereo equipment, a compact disc player and stereo speakers, all valued at more than $2,500, were stolen yesterday from a van parked in the 2000 block of Gough St.Eastern DistrictShooting: Two men were shot Monday night during an attempted armed robbery by two other men in the 1700 block of N. Collington Ave. Both victims -- one from the...
NEWS
September 20, 1998
Listed below, in descending order, are the 16 Baltimore schools that posted the highest gains in third-grade reading comprehension tests between fall 1997 and spring 1998, on citywide tests. Students took the California Diagnostic Reading Test last September; in May, they took the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills 4 Test.Scores are reported as grade equivalents, with 3.0 representing where third-graders should be at the beginning of the school year and 4.0 representing where they should be at the end of theschool year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2010
Dolores M. Soul, a retired Maryland State Department of Education official, died Monday of cancer at Future Care Charles Village. She was 70. Dolores Mary Soul was born at home on Rose Street and was a 1957 graduate of Catholic High School. She was a graduate of the University of Baltimore, where she earned an accounting degree. A certified public accountant, she also held a bachelor's degree from what is now Loyola University Maryland. Ms. Soul was the section chief for general accounting for the state education department for 35 years.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and William E. Thompson and Ivan Penn and William E. Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | March 22, 1997
After battling for more than a decade against businessman Willard J. Hackerman, opponents of his Pulaski Highway incinerator have dealt the operation a blow that could keep it out of business for good.The Maryland Senate gave final approval yesterday to a bill banning the reopening of closed incinerators or construction of new ones within a mile of a school -- a measure aimed specifically at the Hackerman incinerator, which shut down two years ago and is near about a half-dozen schools.Senators voted 35-9 to send the legislation to the governor, who is expected to sign it into law.Lawmakers had propose a similar measure last year, but failed to get it through the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | December 1, 2006
CINCINNATI -- On the Ravens first offensive play, a 15-yard run by Jamal Lewis, the six friends from Baltimore experienced the hardships that can come from being part of a minority. Lewis' run earned the childhood buddies -- wearing purple from head to toe -- a negative reaction from the natives. They heard the taunts of a few of the surrounding Cincinnati Bengals fans, some aimed at the Ravens star running back and subsequently the team's road-warrior fans. "You just have to let it go," said Jeff Meyers after hearing a fan curse at his group, "because I know the beatings that some of the out-of-town fans get in our stadium.
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