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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Confederate Gen. Lewis Addison Armistead, who was mortally wounded during Pickett's ill-fated charge at Gettysburg, sleeps away the ages in a quiet Baltimore cemetery. And how he came to spend eternity here is somewhat of a mystery. Armistead was appointed to West Point in 1934, but was dismissed after breaking a plate over the head of Jubal A. Early, who later became a Confederate lieutenant general and also fought at Gettysburg. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 6th U.S. Infantry in 1839 and fought in the Mexican War, where he was promoted to brevet rank of captain for gallantry.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
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NEWS
May 5, 2003
Earlyn M. Crumbaker, a longtime Armistead Gardens activist, died of undetermined causes Wednesday at her daughter's home in Stone Mountain, Ga. She was 87. Earlyn McIntire was born and raised in Smithfield, W.Va., where she graduated from high school. During the late 1930s, she worked in a Wheeling, W.Va., confectionery store. After her 1939 marriage to John Henry Crumbaker, the couple settled on East North Avenue in Baltimore. Mr. Crumbaker, a firefighter at the Broening Highway plant of General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2013
Confederate Gen. Lewis Addison Armistead, who was mortally wounded during Pickett's ill-fated charge at Gettysburg, sleeps away the ages in a quiet Baltimore cemetery. And how he came to spend eternity here is somewhat of a mystery. Armistead was appointed to West Point in 1934, but was dismissed after breaking a plate over the head of Jubal A. Early, who later became a Confederate lieutenant general and also fought at Gettysburg. He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 6th U.S. Infantry in 1839 and fought in the Mexican War, where he was promoted to brevet rank of captain for gallantry.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | February 7, 1991
WHEN LUKE A. SHAW was a year old, his brother, left home to care for his little sibling, secured him with a belt in a tiny rocking chair by the fire place. Shaw rocked and rocked, until he pitched forward into the fire's dying embers. He landed on his forehead and hands. His sister and brother retrieved him, and his mother came home in time to find the flesh melting from his fingers.Three years later, Shaw remembers, there was a train ride and the consoling Baby Ruth candy bars his father plied him with as they traveled from their rural North Carolina home to the hospital in Gastonia.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2004
With blocks and blocks of barrackslike buildings, Armistead Gardens is a throwback to World War II, when it was home to an army of out-of-town workers toiling in Baltimore's defense manufacturers. The 169-acre complex next to Herring Run Park in East Baltimore later became an unusual nonprofit housing cooperative. The 1,518-unit development is about to launch a bold experiment: It will sell 65 fix-up vacant units at cost. Some homes could go for as little as $5,000, predicted Leon Bonnell, a retired Sparrows Point worker and Armistead Gardens official.
NEWS
By Stacy Malyil and Stacy Malyil,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 23, 2002
The Battle of Gettysburg turned the tide of the Civil War, and Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, proved to be the climactic clash of that battle. Spearheading this frontal assault on the Union line on Cemetery Ridge was Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead's brigade, which crossed into history and legend as it crossed the angle of a stone wall protecting the Union troops atop the ridge, and plowed into Union forces under Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb, whose brigade did not have a strong hold on the position.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
In Tom Horton's On The Bay column May 29, a reference to the British attack on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812 was incorrect. The British bombardment of the fort took place Sept. 12-14, 1814.The Sun regrets the errors.TRAFFIC is heavy, mostly frogs hopping along the narrow Elliott Island road in the wee hours of a chilly, rain-soaked May morning.To avoid squashing amphibians, the driver of the GMC Suburban with license plate OSPREY swerves frequently. The searchlight held out of the window in his free hand slices wildly across the dark Dorchester marsh.
NEWS
October 27, 1994
* CORRECTION: Southeastern District -- In a shooting reported in Wednesday's edition of the Police Blotter, Wellsbach Way was identified as being in Armistead Gardens. The street is in O'Donnell Heights.
NEWS
By Joseph Esposito and Joseph Esposito,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
Southern hopes for victory at Gettysburg were dashed when Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863, failed to break the Union army's hold on Cemetery Ridge. Maj. Gen. George E. Pickett's division consisted of brigades commanded by Brig. Gen. Richard B. Garnett, Brig. Gen. James Lawson Kemper and Brig. Gen. Lewis A. Armistead. These three men would lead this charge into well-defended Union territory and into American history. In the morning, Pickett's division marched across Spangler's Woods and formed a battle line east of the woods in the open space behind Seminary Ridge.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
A lawsuit challenging both the Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that pit bulls are "inherently dangerous" and a Baltimore landlord's decision to ban the animals from its property to avoid liabilities created under the ruling was recently amended to include the state's governor, attorney general and chief appeals judge as defendants. Gov. Martin O'Malley, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Chief Judge Robert M. Bell are all being sued personally but within their official capacities, according to the amended complaint, which was filed Sunday night.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
As thousands of late-night revelers partied to thumping electronic dance music in the graffiti-marked remains of an old fort in Baltimore last month, some overdosed on drugs or became overwhelmed by the heat, according to a report by the city fire marshal. While the overnight Starscape festival at Fort Armistead Park stretched into the early-morning hours, emergency medical crews from the city and Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties struggled to keep up with calls for help from the venue, responding to the park "continuously" for 12 hours, the report says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2011
Artscape, Whartscape, Scapescape — there's been so many -scapes lately, it's hard to keep track. But it's almost impossible confuse any them with Starscape, the overnight electronic and dance music festival that's now in its 13th year. Celebrated annually at Fort Armistead Park, Starscape begins at 2 p.m. Saturday and ends at 6 a.m. Sunday. Major headliners of the genre will perform, among them, Bassnectar, Zeds Dead, Uncle Jesse and Daedelus. DJ Steve Aoki will also be there.
NEWS
August 21, 2009
: Should the white man accused of beating a 76-year-old black man who was fishing at South Baltimore's Fort Armistead Park be charged with a hate crime? Yes 75% No 17% Not sure 8% (1,520 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should Abdel Basset al-Megrahi, the terminally ill man convicted of bombing Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, and killing 270 people in 1988, have been released from prison to die in Libya? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
A white supremacist accused of beating a 76-year-old black fisherman goes by the nickname "Hitler" and has a tattoo of the Nazi leader on his stomach that also reads "He lives," according to police and court records. Court documents released Wednesday show that the victim, James Privott, suffered a fractured eye socket and lost two teeth in the South Baltimore attack, which suspect Calvin E. Lockner told police "wouldn't have happened if he was a white man." Lockner, who faces 19 criminal charges including attempted first-degree murder, was ordered held without bond as new details about his criminal past emerged.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
Here's the scene on a hot Wednesday afternoon at the end of the wooden pier at Baltimore's Fort Armistead Park: A newly arrived immigrant from Vietnam struggled to reel in a 2-pound catfish from the murky depths of the Patapsco River. A black man from West Baltimore put a net in the water to capture the writhing fish. A white man from Arbutus grabbed the line and hauled it in. Then all three men - from two generations and three cultures and races - stood over the pail and admired the biggest catch of the day. Less than an hour earlier, a city judge had denied bail to a white man who police said came to this park early Tuesday and attacked a 76-year-old black fisherman while yelling racial slurs.
NEWS
August 20, 2009
Do you think Maryland Del. Jon S. Cardin owes the public a further explanation of his Baltimore City Police-assisted marriage proposal? Yes 75% No 23% Not sure 2% (1,123 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Should the white man accused of beating a 76-year-old black man who was fishing at South Baltimore's Fort Armistead Park be charged with a hate crime? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
January 8, 2009
On January 6, 2009 MARY McINTYRE (nee Pennington) BOWIE beloved wife of the late Washington Bowie V, devoted mother of Jane Allan Bowie, Washington Bowie 6th, Marion Eliason Bowie Robbins and Landon Armistead Bowie. Also survived by two grandchildren. Service and interment private. In lieu of flowers contributions may be sent to The Maryland Historical Society, 227 W. Monument St., Baltimore 21201. Arrangements by Henry W. Jenkins & Sons.
NEWS
January 8, 2009
On January 6, 2009 MARY McINTYRE (nee Pennington) BOWIE beloved wife of the late Washington Bowie V, devoted mother of Jane Allan Bowie, Washington Bowie 6th, Marion Eliason Bowie Robbins and Landon Armistead Bowie. Also survived by two grandchildren. Service and interment private. In lieu of flowers contributions may be sent to The Maryland Historical Society, 227 W. Monument St., Baltimore 21201. Arrangements by Henry W. Jenkins & Sons.
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