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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Dick Armey, the House Republican leader, is trying to replace most of the members of the House ethics committee, which is considering charges against Newt Gingrich, the speaker of the House.Rep. David E. Bonior of Michigan, the Democratic whip, who has filed several of the charges of tax and campaign law violations pending against the speaker, said such a change would amount to an effort to fix the case. Republicans said it was normal housekeeping.The ethics committee news came as House Republicans, without dissent, chose Gingrich and Armey as their leaders in the 105th Congress.
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NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The continuing shake-up at the White House is the clearest acknowledgment yet that President Bush has scaled back his once-lofty priorities in favor of what strategists call a less visionary - but just as crucial - goal: helping Republicans keep control of Congress. It is a familiar theme for a president who, along with longtime strategist Karl Rove, has viewed a lasting Republican majority as a key part of his legacy. Bush's decision to relieve Rove of an official policy post was interpreted by many party strategists not as a downgrading of his influential aide's role but as a public statement that Republican victories in the 2006 elections now top his wish list.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Dick Armey spent eight months last year preparing for a Republican takeover few others believed would happen. But the No. 2 House Republican has found an area he overlooked: coping with life in the limelight.The majority leader's recent gaffe, in which he referred to openly gay Rep. Barney Frank as "Barney Fag," caused a political uproar from which the seven-term Texan says he has still not recovered."I was shocked . . . that nobody would believe me," said Mr. Armey, who contends he simply stumbled over Mr. Frank's name and out came a word that, coincidentally, was a slur against homosexuals.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
Retired House Majority Leader Dick Armey has confirmed that his post-congressional career will include work at the Washington and Dallas offices of Piper Rudnick LLP, a global law firm that has been aggressively building a government affairs practice with well-connected lawyers and professionals. The Texas Republican will start today at Piper Rudnick as a senior policy adviser to some of the firm's largest clients, possibly in defense- and technology-related industries. He will not directly lobby his former congressional colleagues -- even after the elapse of a period during which departing members of Congress are not permitted to lobby, Armey and the firm said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2003
Retired House Majority Leader Dick Armey has confirmed that his post-congressional career will include work at the Washington and Dallas offices of Piper Rudnick LLP, a global law firm that has been aggressively building a government affairs practice with well-connected lawyers and professionals. The Texas Republican will start today at Piper Rudnick as a senior policy adviser to some of the firm's largest clients, possibly in defense- and technology-related industries. He will not directly lobby his former congressional colleagues -- even after the elapse of a period during which departing members of Congress are not permitted to lobby, Armey and the firm said.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2001
House Majority Leader Dick Armey and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume are scheduled to meet Thursday in Washington after NAACP leaders recently accused President Bush of dividing the country. At the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington last month, Board of Directors Chairman Julian Bond held no punches, saying, "They [the Bush administration] selected nominees from the Taliban wing of American politics, appeased the wretched appetites of the extreme right wing and chose Cabinet officials whose devotion to the Confederacy is nearly canine in its uncritical affection."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the latest Republican effort to revive the party's stymied economic and social agendas, House Majority Leader Dick Armey said yesterday that Congress would refuse to extend the nation's ability to borrow money to meet its bills unless President Clinton yields to the party's budget-cutting initiatives to decrease "the size and intrusiveness of government."The position outlined by Mr. Armey of Texas, a close ally of Speaker Newt Gingrich, signaled that the Republicans might be jTC willing to use the threat of national default to force Mr. Clinton to give more ground.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a potential shake-up to national politics, House Majority Leader Dick Armey is telling congressional colleagues that he doubts he will run for re-election next year, one of the Texas Republican's closest confidants said yesterday. "Armey is considering not filing for re-election for next year's election and serving out his term in Congress in the next session as majority leader," he said. Armey spokesman Gayland Barksdale declined to comment. No announcement of Armey's decision has been scheduled.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume discussed everything from proposed tax cuts to racial profiling yesterday during a meeting in Armey's Capitol office that followed weeks of heated accusations from both sides. The hourlong meeting was closed to the news media, but the two men held a news conference shortly afterward, with the Texas Republican declaring that "Kweisi Mfume and I just had a wonderful visit." Armey, standing next to Mfume at a podium outside the Capitol, said education, economics, hate crimes and racial profiling were among the issues discussed.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey's expected announcement today that he won't seek re-election next year has already touched off a race among Republicans to succeed him in which the influential majority whip, Tom DeLay, is heavily favored. Armey, 61, a folksy nine-term representative from suburban Dallas who speaks as often of fishing, football and his family as he does of legislation, has told friends he will retire next year from his safe seat to spend time on other pursuits.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | August 29, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- Gosh, silly us, getting in a swivet over war and peace. The president is on vacation! He's giving interviews to Runner's World, not Meet the Press. He and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld didn't even talk about Iraq during their meeting at Crawford. It was all the media's fault. We were "churning," we were in "a frenzy." Heck, Mr. Bush himself has never even mentioned war with Iraq, much less going it alone. We don't have to worry, so party hearty, and try not to make a big deal out of the fact that Mr. Bush's lawyers are now claiming he can launch an attack on Iraq without congressional approval because the permission given by Congress to his father in 1991 to wage war in the Persian Gulf is still in effect.
NEWS
July 26, 2002
IF THE SUBJECT is fishing, football or his family, Republican Rep. Dick Armey of Texas is all smiles and corny jokes -- usually told in the lyrics of a country song. What ticks him off is big government bullies -- the kind who want to take all your money in taxes and then tell you how to live your life. Unmanned cameras that record traffic violations and then send tickets in the mail are among his latest gripes. So it should come as no surprise to President Bush that the House majority leader has moved quickly to squash like a bug the schemes for violating privacy contained in the president's plans for homeland defense.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey's expected announcement today that he won't seek re-election next year has already touched off a race among Republicans to succeed him in which the influential majority whip, Tom DeLay, is heavily favored. Armey, 61, a folksy nine-term representative from suburban Dallas who speaks as often of fishing, football and his family as he does of legislation, has told friends he will retire next year from his safe seat to spend time on other pursuits.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a potential shake-up to national politics, House Majority Leader Dick Armey is telling congressional colleagues that he doubts he will run for re-election next year, one of the Texas Republican's closest confidants said yesterday. "Armey is considering not filing for re-election for next year's election and serving out his term in Congress in the next session as majority leader," he said. Armey spokesman Gayland Barksdale declined to comment. No announcement of Armey's decision has been scheduled.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume discussed everything from proposed tax cuts to racial profiling yesterday during a meeting in Armey's Capitol office that followed weeks of heated accusations from both sides. The hourlong meeting was closed to the news media, but the two men held a news conference shortly afterward, with the Texas Republican declaring that "Kweisi Mfume and I just had a wonderful visit." Armey, standing next to Mfume at a podium outside the Capitol, said education, economics, hate crimes and racial profiling were among the issues discussed.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | March 7, 2001
IT IS HIGH time NAACP board Chairman Julian Bond has his mouth bronzed and retired. Once that happens, Kweisi Mfume, NAACP president and chief executive officer, can proceed with his plans to meet with Republican leaders to find ways for them and America's black community to work together. An article in the March 4 editions of The Sun by reporter Laurie Willis included excerpts of letters exchanged between Mfume and House of Representatives Majority Leader Dick Armey. Armey said comments that Mfume and Bond made Feb. 17 during the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington, when both accused President George W. Bush of sharply dividing the nation, amounted to reverse race-baiting.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey accused NAACP President Kweisi Mfume and board of directors Chairman Julian Bond of "racial McCarthyism" in a letter to Mfume last week. Armey's accusations were made in response to comments Mfume and Bond made Feb. 17 during the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington, when both leaders said President Bush was sharply dividing the nation instead of uniting it as he has vowed to do. During the meeting, Bond told about 350 people gathered in the ballroom of the Capital Hilton, "Instead of uniting us, the new administration almost daily separates and divides."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- House Republican leaders, under pressure from their own freshmen, caustic Democrats and loyal senior Republicans, have decided to bring anti-lobbying measures to the floor in the next few weeks, abandoning their plan to wait until next year.They plan to take up the bill the Senate passed in July, which would require the registration of thousands of lobbyists who now escape the loose restraints in the current law.They also expect to duplicate the Senate's gift ban, which imposes a limit of $100 in gifts and meals to legislators or their aides from any person in a single year.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 4, 2001
House Majority Leader Dick Armey and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume are scheduled to meet Thursday in Washington after NAACP leaders recently accused President Bush of dividing the country. At the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington last month, Board of Directors Chairman Julian Bond held no punches, saying, "They [the Bush administration] selected nominees from the Taliban wing of American politics, appeased the wretched appetites of the extreme right wing and chose Cabinet officials whose devotion to the Confederacy is nearly canine in its uncritical affection."
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - House Majority Leader Dick Armey accused NAACP President Kweisi Mfume and board of directors Chairman Julian Bond of "racial McCarthyism" in a letter to Mfume last week. Armey's accusations were made in response to comments Mfume and Bond made Feb. 17 during the NAACP's annual meeting in Washington, when both leaders said President Bush was sharply dividing the nation instead of uniting it as he has vowed to do. During the meeting, Bond told about 350 people gathered in the ballroom of the Capital Hilton, "Instead of uniting us, the new administration almost daily separates and divides."
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