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NEWS
July 31, 2011
I am an American who is concerned about our debt and excessive spending, such as on foreign aid to nations that work against us and kill our soldiers. Since the Senate and House Appropriations committees are considering the FY2012 foreign aid bill, with the House Appropriations Committee set to vote on the bill on August 3, I would like to re-state my views on this as I did a few months ago when the FY2012 appropriations process just started. We need to reduce spending by all means possible, especially to places that work against U.S., such as Armenia.
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NEWS
August 3, 2011
In response to the recent letter regarding foreign assistance to Armenia ("Cut foreign aid to Armenia and other countries that work against United States," July 31), the proposition to reduce assistance to Armenia and other states whose domestic and foreign policy agendas do not closely align with those of the U.S. is a complex topic worthy of further debate. While the U.S. is currently facing a challenging fiscal scenario, reducing foreign assistance to the states in question will only serve to further strain strategic relationships that require delicate handling.
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NEWS
September 30, 1994
The latest Armenian tragedy, a mudslide, may seem as remote as Armenia's six-year war with Azerbaijan. But Armenia is defined by Christianity (which it was the first nation to adopt), its unique alphabet (invented to strengthen the religion), and art created as religious devotion.The greatest exhibition of Armenian Christian art ever shown in America is currently at the Walters Art Gallery. It consists of 89 illuminated manuscripts, mostly of the Gospels, from 30 collections, produced over the centuries.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
I am an American who is concerned about our debt and excessive spending, such as on foreign aid to nations that work against us and kill our soldiers. Since the Senate and House Appropriations committees are considering the FY2012 foreign aid bill, with the House Appropriations Committee set to vote on the bill on August 3, I would like to re-state my views on this as I did a few months ago when the FY2012 appropriations process just started. We need to reduce spending by all means possible, especially to places that work against U.S., such as Armenia.
NEWS
September 22, 1990
After months of turbulence, the Armenian government scored a significant victory recently when it managed to disarm a leading private army in an attempt to halt deadly fratricidal gun battles. Granted, other para-military formations and splinter groups continue to exist. But if the zealots of the Armenian National Army can be kept in check, Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrossian will have some badly needed breathing room in his efforts to show that his republic is capable of orderly self-rule.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 1993
MOSCOW -- A gas pipeline supplying the only fuel to Armenia exploded again yesterday, forcing the besieged republic to shiver through a fierce snowstorm without heat or light.The Armenian government said the 4 a.m. blast tore a 6-foot gap in the newly repaired pipeline in the same mountainous region of neighboring Georgia where the pipe blew up Jan. 23. Saboteurs trying to tighten a wartime blockade of Armenia were suspected in both acts.Reacting to the January incident, Armenian forces backed by warplanes and heavy artillery launched a major offensive last Friday in their undeclared war against Azerbaijan, seizing 11 settlements in the disputed mountain enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 23, 1993
WHILE THE American electorate focuses on domestic economic matters and steers away from foreign affairs, in certain tragic corners of the world events are occurring that confound the human mind.If one looks at the case of Armenia today, one can hardly believe what one is seeing and hearing. Armenia is "returning to the Dark Ages." Armenia is "dying" as a nation. "We're past the crisis stage," says Harut Sassounian, executive director of the United Armenian Fund. "The country has collapsed."
NEWS
By Bill Keller and Bill Keller,New York Times News Service | September 23, 1991
YEREVAN, U.S.S.R. -- Armenia has agreed to renounce any claim to a territory at the heart of its dispute with neighboring Azerbaijan and to enter formal negotiations on the issue today in an attempt to end the Soviet Union's bloodiest and longest-running civil conflict, officials said here yesterday.The apparent breakthrough came as Armenia prepared to declare its independence formally from the Soviet Union. Officials announced last night that more than 94 percent of the voters supported independence in a referendum Saturday, which was certain to be ratified by the Parliament today.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 24, 1993
MOSCOW -- The tiny republic of Armenia, shivering throug its third straight winter of wartime fuel shortages, plunged deeper into darkness yesterday after an explosion in neighboring Georgia severed its only energy supply from the outside.The explosion ruptured a gas pipeline in Marneuli, a rural district of Georgia populated mainly by Azerbaijanis. Armenians and Azerbaijanis are waging an undeclared war that has claimed more than 3,000 lives and created a half-million refugees in the past four years.
NEWS
February 1, 1997
THE COLLAPSE OF the Soviet Union five years ago hit Armenia with a double-edged sword. The ancient Armenian homeland was again free but its economy went into a free fall. Within a year, gross domestic product fell by 52.4 percent. So did industrial production. Inflation went wild; the standard of living plummeted.In the last two years, things have improved markedly. With gross domestic product increasing by nearly 7 percent in 1995, landlocked Armenia became the fastest growing former constituent republic of the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | October 16, 2007
What were they thinking? No doubt members of the House Foreign Relations Committee felt righteous about the nonbinding resolution they passed last week condemning World War I massacres of Armenians in Ottoman Turkey as "genocide." They sloughed off the warnings from Turkey, which rejects the genocide charge. Several 90-something Armenian ladies who survived the massacres were in attendance in wheelchairs. Democratic legislators from states with large Armenian constituencies were pressing Speaker Nancy Pelosi to push the resolution.
NEWS
By John Freeman | February 25, 2007
Salman Rushdie once noted that societies that emerged from colonial rule in the '50s, '60s and '70s became hotbeds for literary invention. "The Empire Writes Back," he called the phenomenon, punning on George Lucas' Star Warsfilm. That phrase is gaining new currency in Turkey, where, according to 35-year-old writer Elif Shafak, a young generation of Turks is using the novel, a form that came to them from the West, to reimagine their society from within. "Novelists have played a very, very critical role as the engineers of social and cultural transformation in Turkey," Shafak says, sitting in an empty hotel ballroom in New York City.
NEWS
By BILL THOMAS | November 4, 2005
The 15 former Soviet republics, now into their second decade as separate nations, have experienced very different degrees of political freedom and economic success. But it's the three Caucasus nations - Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan - that might offer the best example of the problems, and lately the opportunities, facing countries in what the Russians used to call "the near abroad." Subdivided by civil wars in the 1990s, Georgia, with help from the United States, has embarked on an ambitious campaign to clean up corruption and overhaul its stagnant economy.
NEWS
By JOHN RIVERA and JOHN RIVERA,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2001
WASHINGTON - In the year 301, a pious Christian man in the Kingdom of Armenia was tortured for his faith and thrown into a pit, where he was imprisoned for 13 years. According to legend, Gregory the Illuminator performed a miracle once he was freed from the pit, curing the insanity of the persecuting king. The king, in turn, experienced a religious conversion and proclaimed Armenia a Christian state -- the first in history. Once he was freed from the pit, he performed a miraculous cure of the persecuting king, who experienced a religious conversion and in 301 A.D., proclaimed Armenia a Christian state - the first in history.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan told President Bush yesterday that they have made substantial progress in talks aimed at ending more than 12 years of ethnic conflict over the disputed enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, senior U.S. officials said. "We were surprised at how far they came," one official said in reference to negotiations last week in Key West, Fla., between Armenian President Robert Kocharyan and Azerbaijani President Heydar A. Aliyev. The official said Bush encouraged Kocharyan and Aliyev during separate meetings in the Oval Office to "keep at the process."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 1, 2001
SAATLI, Azerbaijan - They are ghostly figures, long forgotten by the world, more than 570,000 refugees living in railroad boxcars, snake-infested holes in the ground, mud huts and abandoned buildings. Once, the world cared deeply for them. That was nearly 10 years ago when the Soviet Union was freshly dissolved and embers from a war between the newly independent states of Azerbaijan and Armenia threatened to raise uncontrollable flames from the ashes of the Cold War. But the fight for a mountainous sliver of land called Nagorno-Karabakh ended with an Armenian victory and a cease-fire in 1994.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 25, 1998
YEREVAN, Armenia -- He's got the pompadour, the golden complexion and the easy humor that enchants a new crowd of voters with every anecdote. Karen Demirchian could almost be mistaken for Ronald Reagan, except that while the U.S. president was railing about the Evil Empire, Demirchian was helping to run it.Demirchian, the first secretary of the Communist Party of Armenia until Mikhail S. Gorbachev pushed him aside 10 years ago for being too rooted in...
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 31, 1999
YEREVAN, Armenia -- The power had failed, as it frequently does here. The chairman of Armenia's most powerful political party sat in the midnight darkness, speaking urgently into the telephone, bargaining over Armenia's future with the nation's president on the other end of the line.The fate of small but ambitious Armenia -- a land the size of Maryland settled on the southern flanks of the Caucasus Mountains -- took a violent turn last week when five Kalashnikov-wielding men burst into parliament and killed eight people, including the country's highest government and legislative leaders.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
SUDDENLY, the strategic land bridge between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea is in flames. If the situation gets worse -- as is likely -- Russia's security concerns could prompt its greater involvement in the region.In Armenia, gunmen invaded the parliament, killing the prime minister and seven other top politicians. In Georgia, tensions are palpable before today's parliamentary elections.Next door in Chechnya, Russian troops are killing anything that moves as they retake the rebellious republic.
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