Advertisement
HomeCollectionsArmani
IN THE NEWS

Armani

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 1, 2008
John McCain to make appearance on 'Saturday Night Live' tonight Live from New York, it's John McCain. Aides to the Republican presidential candidate said yesterday that McCain will appear tonight on Saturday Night Live, the late-night show that has been a must-watch for many during the political season. It might get a little awkward since the host is actor Ben Affleck, a supporter of Democratic candidate Barack Obama. The musical guest is singer David Cook. When McCain's running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, appeared on the show Oct. 18, SNL earned its best ratings in 14 years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 1, 2008
John McCain to make appearance on 'Saturday Night Live' tonight Live from New York, it's John McCain. Aides to the Republican presidential candidate said yesterday that McCain will appear tonight on Saturday Night Live, the late-night show that has been a must-watch for many during the political season. It might get a little awkward since the host is actor Ben Affleck, a supporter of Democratic candidate Barack Obama. The musical guest is singer David Cook. When McCain's running mate, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, appeared on the show Oct. 18, SNL earned its best ratings in 14 years.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,Chicago Tribune | October 10, 1990
MILAN-- Under gray autumn skies, Italian designers launched the spring-summer, 1991 fashion season here Sunday in a burst of color that made the runways glow like spilled boxes of Crayolas.Sparked with Op-Art prints, mini-shapes and vivid hues borrowed from the swinging '60s, the Milanese collections are the first in an international round of women's ready-to-wear presentations that will take the hundreds of retailers and journalists here to London, Paris and New York in the six weeks ahead.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 25, 2008
Sheila Dixon - Baltimore mayor, ardent Sex and the City fan - found something the fictional fashionistas could only dream of: a combination boyfriend-shopping companion. Talk about Mr. Big. Or shall we say, "Ms. No Name," the feminine code name Ronald Lipscomb's vice president used to buy Dixon a $2,000 gift certificate at Lutherville furrier Mano Swartz, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by The Sun's John Fritze. Plenty of boyfriends and husbands out there give pricey presents, especially the gift-certificate variety.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 21, 1994
The fashions of fall were presented in New York last week in the flash of paparazzi cameras and thump of rock -- top models, top designers, top press and big-budget retail buyers. Fashion and its trappings was reported, hyped and criticized by press and TV.The recurring question among the uninitiated was, "Who would wear these clothes?"We all will, in some fashion or other.Screaming neon fake fur coats and mini-skirts were the butt of jokes from trend-immune fashion watchers, but lower-priced copies by the thousands are going into production even as the real world is still sorting the spring closet.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | January 7, 1993
When others ask you to dress them, you know you've got style.So it goes for artist Nancy Valk, who has paid more than one emergency visit to a friend's closet.Being a painter gives her an edge in sizing up color and shape. But having a good figure also helps. With broad shoulders and slim hips -- and an exercise regimen that includes daily 4-mile walks near her Ruxton home -- Ms. Valk, 47, can pull off many styles.How has being an artist shaped your style?I think I've always had a strong sense of style, but working with color and shape and form increases it.How would you describe it?
FEATURES
By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,HARTFORD COURANT | November 7, 1996
It's simple. It's clean. It's part of everyone's wardrobe.The ubiquitous white T-shirt sits in your drawer or hangs in your closet, and you reach for it like an old friend. It's comfortable, it's easy to wear, and you don't have to think twice when you put it on. It works with jeans. It works under a fancy suit. It works as the perfect billboard for your favorite charity or rock band. A no-brainer.But Alice Harris, author and former fashion publicist, has thought a great deal about this wardrobe staple and shares her observations in "The White T" (HarperCollins, $45)
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | June 25, 2008
Sheila Dixon - Baltimore mayor, ardent Sex and the City fan - found something the fictional fashionistas could only dream of: a combination boyfriend-shopping companion. Talk about Mr. Big. Or shall we say, "Ms. No Name," the feminine code name Ronald Lipscomb's vice president used to buy Dixon a $2,000 gift certificate at Lutherville furrier Mano Swartz, according to a search warrant affidavit obtained by The Sun's John Fritze. Plenty of boyfriends and husbands out there give pricey presents, especially the gift-certificate variety.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 25, 2007
Ben Clyburn leaves his $7,000 Armani shoes at home when he goes begging the General Assembly on behalf of state courts. But the chief judge of Maryland's District Court won't say just where in the house he keeps those cap-toed alligator lace-ups. "I have one hidden in one part of the house and another in another part of the house," he said. "I had to put a special rider on my insurance policy." Clyburn didn't buy that fancy footwear on his judge's salary. He didn't buy it at all. He has a son in the fashion industry who interned with Armani while he was a design-school student at Parsons in New York.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 22, 1994
Q: I have a great job with a staff of eight. I must look good. And to do that I need jackets with constructed shoulders. They give my body shape and make me look poised and attractive. But now my sister tells me shoulder pads are "out" and soft shoulders are "in." She says that if I wear my old jackets, I'll look out of fashion.A: This is a question I am asked constantly. Businesswomen who are used to constructed shoulders cannot imagine life without them.They don't have to. You'll be happy to hear that Giorgio Armani, the Italian designer who put working women into jackets, showed both soft and constructed jackets for fall, saying:"The point is in the softness of the fabrics and shapes of the jacket at the hem. It is always flared and fluid.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | November 25, 2007
Ben Clyburn leaves his $7,000 Armani shoes at home when he goes begging the General Assembly on behalf of state courts. But the chief judge of Maryland's District Court won't say just where in the house he keeps those cap-toed alligator lace-ups. "I have one hidden in one part of the house and another in another part of the house," he said. "I had to put a special rider on my insurance policy." Clyburn didn't buy that fancy footwear on his judge's salary. He didn't buy it at all. He has a son in the fashion industry who interned with Armani while he was a design-school student at Parsons in New York.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2000
In the small, northern Italian town of Piacenza, a young man by the name of Giorgio Armani dropped out of college in 1957, and the fashion world hasn't been the same since. Since that day, Armani's name has become so synonymous with high fashion and chic couture that it's hard to believe his $288 million empire has only been around 25 years. But this year, the designer is celebrating the 25th anniversary of founding his own company, and he's doing so with his customary panache. Armani not only has expanded his business this year by introducing cosmetics and home furnishings lines in Europe that will hit U.S. stores next year.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1999
From uptown to down, when Mary Jo Gordon thinks "arts community," she thinks globally. She was recently elected vice president of the board of the Fells Point Creative Alliance and runs Gallerie Francoise et ses freres in Greenspring Station. "Part of what a good art gallery does is involve the entire community with the arts," she says.When Gordon thinks fashion, she thinks in clean simple lines, and well tailored, finely textured clothes. The chances are good that Gordon, 53, will wear her usual, simple uniform at this Sunday's "Homicide Live!
FEATURES
By Donna Larcen and Donna Larcen,HARTFORD COURANT | November 7, 1996
It's simple. It's clean. It's part of everyone's wardrobe.The ubiquitous white T-shirt sits in your drawer or hangs in your closet, and you reach for it like an old friend. It's comfortable, it's easy to wear, and you don't have to think twice when you put it on. It works with jeans. It works under a fancy suit. It works as the perfect billboard for your favorite charity or rock band. A no-brainer.But Alice Harris, author and former fashion publicist, has thought a great deal about this wardrobe staple and shares her observations in "The White T" (HarperCollins, $45)
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
TOKYO -- The elevator girl chants in her sing-song voice: "Welcome. Women's wear, imports, formal wear," and the doors glide open. She bows like a mechanical doll -- at precisely the same angle every time -- and gestures toward the merchandise.Her passengers step into a crowded, edgy city of fashion boutiques. Glistening marble alleys wind past Max Mara, Escada, Calvin Klein and Yoshie Inaba vendors and converge in a miniature traffic circle where the street signs say Gucci and Chanel.This is the third floor of Isetan Department Store, the flagship venue of a $5 billion Tokyo-based retail chain.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 22, 1994
Q: I have a great job with a staff of eight. I must look good. And to do that I need jackets with constructed shoulders. They give my body shape and make me look poised and attractive. But now my sister tells me shoulder pads are "out" and soft shoulders are "in." She says that if I wear my old jackets, I'll look out of fashion.A: This is a question I am asked constantly. Businesswomen who are used to constructed shoulders cannot imagine life without them.They don't have to. You'll be happy to hear that Giorgio Armani, the Italian designer who put working women into jackets, showed both soft and constructed jackets for fall, saying:"The point is in the softness of the fabrics and shapes of the jacket at the hem. It is always flared and fluid.
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1994
Calvin Klein has hired Gabriella Forte, one of Italy's most powerful fashion executives, to be president and chief operating officer of Calvin Klein Inc.Ms. Forte, who was executive vice president of Giorgio Armani and head of its U.S. operations, is so closely linked to Mr. Armani that she often spoke for him in the first person. As Mr. Armani's right hand, Ms. Forte personified the tough and articulate buffer needed by creative personalities whose names are on labels."I think the position that was offered me was very exciting," said Ms. Forte, calling from Milan.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Strom and Stephanie Strom,N.Y. Times | September 11, 1991
In that corner of fashion where Keds, Levis and Hanes are ascendant, enter Giorgio Armani.The Milanese designer ranks among the most revered icons of the 80s. But the 90s have thus far put a emphasis on value, and for many people the uniform of choice has become a pair of jeans and a T-shirt.Armani plans to open a chain of about 200 stark, utilitarian boutiques stocked with jeans, dresses, skirts, coats, T-shirts, sweaters and jackets bearing the label Armani Jeans and selling for the most part for less than $100.
FEATURES
By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1994
Calvin Klein has hired Gabriella Forte, one of Italy's most powerful fashion executives, to be president and chief operating officer of Calvin Klein Inc.Ms. Forte, who was executive vice president of Giorgio Armani and head of its U.S. operations, is so closely linked to Mr. Armani that she often spoke for him in the first person. As Mr. Armani's right hand, Ms. Forte personified the tough and articulate buffer needed by creative personalities whose names are on labels."I think the position that was offered me was very exciting," said Ms. Forte, calling from Milan.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | April 21, 1994
The fashions of fall were presented in New York last week in the flash of paparazzi cameras and thump of rock -- top models, top designers, top press and big-budget retail buyers. Fashion and its trappings was reported, hyped and criticized by press and TV.The recurring question among the uninitiated was, "Who would wear these clothes?"We all will, in some fashion or other.Screaming neon fake fur coats and mini-skirts were the butt of jokes from trend-immune fashion watchers, but lower-priced copies by the thousands are going into production even as the real world is still sorting the spring closet.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.